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Solar Eclipse influenced - 100 year high tides and Earthquakes happening now near India?

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posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


okey dokey!!!

didn't go deep enough!

just looked for eclipses and earthquakes and whether there was something similar
and that was it.

but maybe sometimes, an eclipse could somehow , somewhere have an effect that sometimes causes an earthquake somewhere, somehow...sometimes...

hows that for a new theory!!!






posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 03:52 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


eclipses don't affect tides or earthquakes.

What a moron!

The sun AND the moon both 'pull' on our oceans AND on our mantle. So when they are both in line, they will BOTH be 'pulling' on us at the same time, thus tides WILL be higher and the earth's crust floats on the mantle, so if the mantle tides are high, there WILL be earthquakes.

Learn how the earth works before you try and tell anyone else what affects what.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 04:40 AM
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Check this out, this is not that long ago..
here you see there are 124 quakes in the last 7 days...
Just in that area...

124 quakes , 1 week

[edit on 27/7/2009 by ChemBreather]



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by NathanNewZealand
 


I mean it should be common sense....
Oo>o



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:08 AM
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Originally posted by NathanNewZealand
reply to post by Phage
 


What a moron!


Yeah, Phage we all know that planets who are alligned pull much harder on the eaths crust and oceans...


Why would planet Nuburu be such an issue if it wouldn't affect these kind of things?? I dare you to reply!!!!

I'm glad NathanNewZealand that you've got both your feet firmly planted in reality.....


Peace




posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:17 AM
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reply to post by NathanNewZealand
 


Just watched a show about this yesterday, and according to what I watched you are absolutely correct. I found the illustration mind boggling, I never knew the earth's water and crust extended out the way it does, reaching toward the moon, so we are not always 'round' earth!


It was distinctly noted though during that show that an eclipse, being basically a shadow, would have no effect on the tides.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:33 AM
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see an OP that's just presenting information


The OP has a history of presenting information in well though out, nicely structured way, with lots of semi facts to back up an unsaid theory that we are all about to die due to...."fill in the blank...." disaster caused by... "fill in the blank"...natural occurances.

Phage on the other hand is usually the voice of reason in these threads, and the main reason I even bother to read them anymore.

That being said - at least the OP presents things in a nice package which is more than than many of the posters here do, and some of the responses are really hilarious.

Entertaining.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:46 AM
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There are hundreds of earthquakes every day around the world

earthquake.usgs.gov...

I do not see any relevance for fluctuations being potentiated by a solar eclipse. As for tidal issues - our tides are controlled by the Moon....



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 05:50 AM
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ooooh... the tension builds! you gonna make the Phage upset, and Phage just so you know, whenever I read a thread that's full of $#it I always wait for you or arpmap to come in and set things straight. So maybe help me out with this little theory I thought up while reading this thread... Maybe its really the pre-eclipse and post-eclipse that build up tension/pulling of the earths crust. when an eclipse is set to happen, the moon and sun are, for the most part, on the same side of the earth at different points in the sky, first getting closer to each other, eclipsing and then getting further away from eachother. If you compare the moon and the sun to different strength kids, each holding a piece of rope pulling in a straight line as they move around a balloon (the earth), it would warp the balloon differently on their path. If the strings were pulling on just the right (or wrong) fault lines/weak terrain, from a close proximity to eachother though not yet aligned, could it have adverse effects? I'm no geologist (or whatever vocation is necesary here) but surely this could explain why the earthquakes etc occur sometimes weeks/days before and after an eclipse/alignment. Also, this would be dependant on the location of the sun, moon and area which an eclipse takes place.

I'm probably wrong, it's just a thought
please don't flame me too hard, I wouldnt know where to start on getting any backup for this 'theory'


happy posting



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by Jimjolnir
ooooh... the tension builds! you gonna make the Phage upset, and Phage just so you know, whenever I read a thread that's full of $#it I always wait for you or arpmap to come in and set things straight. So maybe help me out with this little theory I thought up while reading this thread... Maybe its really the pre-eclipse and post-eclipse that build up tension/pulling of the earths crust. when an eclipse is set to happen, the moon and sun are, for the most part, on the same side of the earth at different points in the sky, first getting closer to each other, eclipsing and then getting further away from eachother. If you compare the moon and the sun to different strength kids, each holding a piece of rope pulling in a straight line as they move around a balloon (the earth), it would warp the balloon differently on their path. If the strings were pulling on just the right (or wrong) fault lines/weak terrain, from a close proximity to eachother though not yet aligned, could it have adverse effects? I'm no geologist (or whatever vocation is necesary here) but surely this could explain why the earthquakes etc occur sometimes weeks/days before and after an eclipse/alignment. Also, this would be dependant on the location of the sun, moon and area which an eclipse takes place.

I'm probably wrong, it's just a thought
please don't flame me too hard, I wouldnt know where to start on getting any backup for this 'theory'


happy posting


On the contrary - your post is extremely interesting and sets forth a very good theory - I wonder if there are any phycisists/geologists on here
I am no expert but as my previous post gave a link to the us governments Earthquake stats website and having recently been to Alaska and felt 7 quakes in 3 days- I find the whole thing fascinatiing!
www.olympus.net...

The Alaskan quake of 1964 was devastating and fortunately it was a holiday and everyone was out of town (Anchorage)- now I have no idea if there was any kind of eclipse- so I'll leave it to other ATS'ers to go figure if they want. BUt it has been re-classified as a 9.2 earthquake.....and Earthquake Park is well worth a visit.
Alaska is a very active place for earthquake activity.

Nice post jimjolnir!



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 06:17 AM
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How is the Moon's effect on earth different during the eclipse? Isn't the only difference between the Moon's effect on Earth with or without the eclipse that during the eclipse the Moon is casting a shadow on Earth?



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 06:19 AM
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ok - heres a simple challenge for people who believe that eclipses have a influence on earth quakes

show the evidence - demostrating a statistically significant correlation between earthquakes and eclipses

the earthquake data , and eclipse dates are all archived - just match them up



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 06:32 AM
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Here's something to get you going:

blog.taragana.com...

I do not hold credence nor any faith to blog sites...but you may find it interesting. It's all subjective isn't it?..anyways...read into it what you will (or not)

I am off to bed now...thinking time over....nighty night






posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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questioningall
It’s always good to read your threads.
People take great interest in your post because they get that sense, the sense is in there gut feelings, the gut feeling is the same as yours, that something bad is on its way. I feel it and they feel it to, just as you do. Keep up the posts, you do a great job.
S&F



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:27 AM
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I just opened my daily email about quakes -

He added some information to what I had inserted in a previous post.


These earthquakes are occurring in the region where the solar eclipse was visible four days ago and tidal strains may have helped bring this swarm at this time. It is also located on the geomagnetic equator. The strongest geomagnetic storm in the past ten months occurred four days ago along with the solar eclipse. Strong seismicity is often seen along the geomagnetic equator 4-5 days after unusual or strong geomagnetic storms such as this one. The combination of these two triggering forces may have brought about this swarm at this time. We have been following these and other regional activity in regard to the geomagnetic storm and the solar eclipse over the past several days and readers are encouraged to review these archives. We had expected an earthquake with magnitude up to M 6.5 in the Andaman Islands at this time (forecasts 46993 and 47209) about 150 km south of the current swarm.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


How reliable is this earthquake expert?

Some information I dug up about Lowell Whiteside and his good friend Michael Kozuch:


Whiteside has long studied correlations of earthquakes with solar activity, geomagnetic anomalies, "tectonic stress waves," and global normal modes ("ringing" of the Earth).

Results from these avenues of inquiry haven't appeared in peer-reviewed journals. Usually this means that the data isn't conclusive. Despite the ideals of scientific philosophy, no one publishes vague or negative results.


I think I know where your interest in earthquakes and solar activity comes from now.


The things I'm pointing out might seem subtle, but people with PhD's can point them out without a moment's thought. As Kozuch and Whiteside both have doctorates, these flaws can only be deliberate choices to use substandard methods.

* They count random events as successful forecasts. Consider that in the regions they cover (California, Japan and Taiwan), earthquakes of all sizes occur constantly. Forecasting small quakes there is like forecasting waves at the beach. It is rare that a forecast will not include something they can call a complete success, and we know this because they proclaim an overall success rate of 83 percent!

* Their criterion for a successful location is flawed. Instead of measuring the distance from an earthquake directly, as the radius of a circle, they use a longitude-latitude box. This allows them to call a "hit" an event as much as 1.4 times farther than the radius. (See the illustration.)

* They assess latitude and longitude separately. That way they can declare an "A" quality success for matching an event's latitude, even if the longitude is completely wrong. This procedure is not justified by scientific practice—or even common sense.

* There is a big loophole in the magnitude criterion: an event larger than the forecast can be counted as a success. Considering that all of southern California should be carpeted with forecasts for small quakes (GeoForecaster's go down to M2), magnitude-5 events like the quake of 22 February 2003 will always score as successes, even if they weren't predicted. Thus Kozuch and Whiteside claim over 90 percent success for earthquakes larger than magnitude 6.5, yet they don't say they actually issued forecasts for events of that size.

* They commit the basic statistical distortion of turning a semiquantitative measure of success (their 16-point ABCD metric) into a quantitative "AccuCast" index (0 to 100%), introducing false precision. It's the same error as reading the length of a car trip from your dashboard gauge, then reporting it in centimeters.


Taken from The Bogeyman of Earthquake Prediction

[edit on 27/7/09 by Chadwickus]



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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Nice find Chad


But dont you know when you have no faith in real scientific research or data because you are not being told the truth, these are the type of charlatens one must turn to. At least the expert wasnt George Ure or something as silly as that.

[edit on 27-7-2009 by pazcat]



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by nunya13


I'm pretty sure the OP's aim was to make a connection to solar eclipses


Indeed... and the Op failed! The Op also failed to search for any information that may conclude that the tides in India were a normal occurrence and expected around this time of the year, (thank you paz).

The Op only seeks turmoil and disaster (as history has shown) and conveniently ignores anyone providing evidence, no matter how strong, to the contrary. The Op still hasn't reneged from a previous thread that Jupiter has ignited into a second sun!

That speaks volumes to me!

IRM



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


Even if an event is known about at forehand dont make normal.
Just shows they know it is coming, normal or not..

just to ecaturate, if they knew a global flood was coming, it would still be abnormal , not normal because they said so first..



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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Granted it may not be an everyday experiecne but the risk is a annual one. City officials expect to have to deal with this more and more in the future. It is monsoon season over there and they know full well that the high tides caused by either a new or full moon in conjunction with a tropical storm means they are up for a bit of flooding. Not being caused by a Solar eclipse. City officials are well prepared and even took advertising in local papers the week before.


On 26/7/2005, the city was inundated after it received 944 mm rainfall in 24 hours and the tide was 4.48 metres then.


indianexpress.com

[edit on 27-7-2009 by pazcat]



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