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Monolith on Mars? Interesting image

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posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:09 PM
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This is what Buzz was talking about right? "The monolith on mars moon".




posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:14 PM
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The object is some 4.5 to 5 metres long, and I think it's just one of the rocks that fell from the top of that slope.

(click for full size)


This is the general area, with the object marked with a red circle (or more correctly, circumference
)
(click for full size)


I have seen in other photos from Mars other rocks like that, that look like large blocks, and in one of those photos it was visible an area that was breaking apart in block-like pieces.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:15 PM
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No, Buzz was speaking about the monolith on Phobos, the potato shaped moon of Mars. This image detail is from the most recently released photos taken of Mars.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


The light (in that, the not map-projected image) comes from the bottom right (at an angle of 129.6º from the top, clockwise), and is consistent in all the image.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:18 PM
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There are some massive images here from the area you are talking about:

hirise.lpl.arizona.edu...



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


No, Google Mars does not have the imaging nessicary,lol you know that. Of course there should be some decent areas on GM(haven't been on there in quite a while as Mars is not my 'thing',lol) if they have been updated with HiRise images from the MRO. Even with these pictures we are still looking at large distances in each pixel, again you know that as well, but I will be redundant for the members who don't.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


This photo is from Mars (Latitude: -7.2°, Longitude: 267.4° E) and it's not a computer generated version of the photo, you can see the official page for that photo here.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Which image, the OPs or the one I showed? I am not sure they are the same to be honest.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by BartS
 


You should see the images that have more than 2GB, those are BIG images.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:22 PM
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Thanks Armap!

I have question:

If the object is indeed 5 meters in length, then how far below the sand must it go in order for it to stand not only upright, but at an angle without tipping over. I believe Mars has high winds correct?

Thanks for chiming in with the much needed size details!



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


I don't think that your first photo shows the same as the photo in the OP, and the second is the one on Phobos, while this one is on Mars.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


LOL. I could see my computer just starting to smoke. I'm still downloading the RGB version to have a look.

It's probably a rock but is very interesting either way.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by super70
 



I believe Mars has high winds correct?


Correct, although I am not ArMap I will answer that one too.


There are a few 'monoliths' on Mars, and of course the one on Phobos, I think most of the reported monoliths are natural possible. But two (the one on Phobos, and the one in the pic I showed) are definitely interesting IMO.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Yea I knew the second was Phobos, I too think the first is different. I am going to try and find the coord. and see for sure.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Google Earth (when we select Mars from the "Planet" drop-down menu) has HiRISE photos, but this one is not yet in there, this is from this weak's release (they have wealy releases since the start of the mission, with larger releases to the Planetary Data System every 3 months)



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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Originally posted by super70
No, Buzz was speaking about the monolith on Phobos, the potato shaped moon of Mars. This image detail is from the most recently released photos taken of Mars.


Oh, ok. Thank you for clearing that up for me. Monoliths everywhere...lol.

Maybe 2010 really will be the year we make contact....Thanks Arthur

Peace

[edit on 25-7-2009 by letthereaderunderstand]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Cool! Thanks.

OP had a question for you, about Martian winds. I think it's safe to say the winds might get strong, occasionally, but the atmosphere is so thin, their force is negligible. At least, if it's about toppling over a monolith!!

However, over time, even those thin winds can cause erosive forces. Even an ant can move a rubber tree plant!!



Well...checked the interwebs, found this:



What is the wind speed during a dust storm on Mars?


Despite secondhand estimates of higher velocities, official observed gust velocities on Mars are in the range of 80-120 mph (120-160 km/hr). At higher altitudes, the movement of dust was measured at 250-300 mph (400-480 km/hr).
The Martian atmosphere at the surface is only .006 (six tenths of one percent) the density of Earth's. So the high velocity would impart much less energy than a similar wind on Earth.

However, Mars' lower gravity also allows more dust to be picked up, and kept suspended by thermal imbalances. Long-lasting dust storms could present a significant problem for man-made devices and structures.

PlanetMars



[edit on 25 July 2009 by weedwhacker]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by super70
 


I don't know if it is upright or not, the shadow may be hiding part of the object, so it could be almost a slab-like rock on its side.

The winds are very strong but with little energy because the air is so thin, so while it is strong enough to move the very fine dust around (and remove it from the Rover's solar panels), it is not strong enough to flip over a Rover, for instance, something that would be easy for a Earth wind at those speeds to do.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:40 PM
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I would still like to know that if the object is 5 meters in length, how much more of the object would need to be beneath the sand in order to stand this object up at an angle?

I would think it must be at least double the height above sand, but I am no good with math!

So in my view, the total object size at a minimum would need to be in the range of 10 to 15 meters in total length.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


The area immediately surrounding the anomoly seems to be disturbed or of different texture than in the rest of the photo. Not saying that this means anything, just sayin



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