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Hubble's Picture of Jupiter Scar

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posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 09:21 PM
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In an unusual step, NASA scientists interrupted testing of the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope to aim the orbiter's camera at Jupiter and capture an image of the planet's mysterious new scar.

The resulting picture, taken Thursday, is the sharpest visible-light photo of the dark spot and Hubble's first science observation since astronauts repaired and upgraded it in May, NASA said.

Earth-based telescopes have been trained on Jupiter since an amateur astronomer in Australia noticed the new mark, probably created when a small comet or asteroid plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere and disintegrated, early Monday.

But in its rarified orbit 347 miles above the Earth, the Hubble has a better view of the gaseous planet.

This week's event marks only the second time scientists have recorded debris colliding with Jupiter, the fifth planet from the sun and the largest in our solar system. The appearance of the impact spot is changing day to day in the planet's cloud tops, making it a priority for scientists to document it quickly.

Although the Hubble is not expected to resume full operations until late summer and its new camera is still being calibrated, NASA scientists decided the Jupiter event was too significant not to put the orbiting observatory back into action for a day.

www.cnn.com...


This pic is much better than the ones we have been seeing. And it's the 1st image that Hubble has snapped since it's repairs.

[edit on 24-7-2009 by Aggie Man]




posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 09:26 PM
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Here is the picture from CNN



So now it is in the thread and people don't have to go to a link.

Good picture from the hubble



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 04:50 AM
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www.nasa.gov...

And here it would be for those of us who have bad eyes
(3000x2000 pixel)



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 04:54 AM
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That must have been a damn big lump of something to have created a mark like that...at least it means one less stray bullet flying around the solar system



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


Thank you for posting the picture. I was in a hurry last night and forgot to add the pict.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by debunky
 


Thank you for the link to the larger picture. You are right, us with bad eyes can see it better LOL



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 12:24 PM
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Originally posted by Taikonaut
That must have been a damn big lump of something to have created a mark like that...at least it means one less stray bullet flying around the solar system


Yep that's the great thing about those gas giants, they suck up a lot of the things that might stop us living


Good old Jupiter.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 01:03 PM
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This was actually discovered by an amateur who notified nasa. He caught the strike on camera...and he comes form my home...kinda proud

The scar is the size of earth!


Wesley, who spends about 20 hours a week on his passion of watching and photographing Jupiter, spotted the strike using the telescope at the bottom of his garden in Murrumbatema at about 1am yesterday (4pm BST on Sunday)
He recorded the moment in his observation log: "I noticed a dark spot rotating into view in Jupiter's south polar region [and] started to get curious," he said. "My next thought was that it must be either a dark moon ... or a moon shadow, but it was in the wrong place and the wrong size.

"By two o'clock I'd come back up to the house and was sending alerts to all the people I could think of that should be looking at this and especially the professional astronomers with specialised instruments for measuring this," he said.

Wesley emailed scientists at Nasa's jet propulsion laboratory in Pasadena, California. Using Nasa's infrared telescope facility at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, they gathered evidence indicating an impact.

"We were extremely lucky to be seeing Jupiter at exactly the right time, the right hour, the right side of Jupiter to witness the event. We couldn't have planned it better," said Glenn Orton, a scientist at the Pasadena lab..


www.guardian.co.uk...



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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The worrying thing is NASA didn't see it coming...



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by Chriswok
The worrying thing is NASA didn't see it coming...

Yeah -- well, it hit Jupiter. I would think there are a lot of asteroids and meteors out by Jupiter that we don't know about -- and I bet there are unknown objects that are even closer that that, such as in the asteroid belt.

I don't know if that makes you feel better (knowing that it was very far away from Earth) or worse (knowing that there are a lot more where that came from)!

[edit on 7/25/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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oops

[edit on 25-7-2009 by Optix]

[edit on 25-7-2009 by Optix]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 05:13 PM
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In re: Jupiter's Scar...

I picked up a radio show last night (about 1:45-2:00 am et) on AM, was fading in and out.

It was formatted sort of like Coast to Coast, in English, but with a Latino beat. I never got a station or show name. Anyway, there was some guy talking about how this was actually an 'exit wound' rather than an impact. The gist was that it was caused by either an explosion or something exiting Jupiter, not crashing into it.

Wish I could have gotten a radio station call sign or something... it was pretty damned wild.

...



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Well more the fact that something that big they hadn't really tracked and projected its course. I thought they had teams of people keeping track of things up there!



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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Originally posted by Chriswok
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Well more the fact that something that big they hadn't really tracked and projected its course. I thought they had teams of people keeping track of things up there!

People are tracking near-Earth and asteroids (and large meteors) and earth-crossing asteroids -- i.e., asteroids that cross the orbit of the Earth. This was not one of those near-Earth/Earth-crossing objects.

This asteroid was probably about 1 km or less in size. There are probably over a million asteroids in the asteroid belt (perhaps 2 million) that are at least as large as the object that hit Jupiter.

They don't track them all.


[edit on 7/25/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 09:42 PM
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What I find amazing is that this was discovered by an amature! I am suprised that there isn't at least one professional telescope pointed at Jupiter at all times. Is there not some sort of team dedicated to Jupiter?

Or are the ellite just pretending that an amature was the only one looking.

Just seems rather odd.


jra

posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by fieryjaguarpaw
What I find amazing is that this was discovered by an amature!


Astronomy is something amateurs can actually make significant contributions to and they do all the time. Many comets, for example, have been discovered by amateurs.


I am suprised that there isn't at least one professional telescope pointed at Jupiter at all times. Is there not some sort of team dedicated to Jupiter?


Besides the fact that you can't point a telescope at Jupiter at all times (due to the Earth's rotation), it would be a waste of a telescope. And no, there are no dedicated teams for observing any planet.



posted on Jul, 26 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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Well we have two droids running around on the surface of mars, one lander (that is now dead) and how many craft orbiting the red planet?
But on the other hand we don't have anyone on a professional level looking at Jupiter? Not even with a small scope like the one I assume this amature used?

It seems like at the very least we are neglecting some basic stuff. How much would it cost to pay one or two people to monitor a planet with a simple scope? It seems odd that we don't even keep an eye on the big stuff in our own system.



posted on Jul, 26 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by fieryjaguarpaw
It seems like at the very least we are neglecting some basic stuff. How much would it cost to pay one or two people to monitor a planet with a simple scope? It seems odd that we don't even keep an eye on the big stuff in our own system.

Pay me, I'll do it! In all seriousness, since there's a whole army of us amateurs out there observing Jupiter, Saturn, etc with scopes in that size range every night, what would be the benefit? Beat every amateur to the punch just so we can say we did so? That would undermine the good working relationship the amateur community has with the professional community. We have pictures from amateurs showing Jupiter just hours before and after impact, none show any objects prior to impact either because it approached and impacted on the night side of Jupiter, which is always facing away from earth (pretty likely), or the object was just too faint to be detected by short exposures that would properly expose Jupiter (highly likely as well). The most powerful advantage the amateur community provides is vigilance; don't forget that an amateur, David Levy, was involved in the discovery of the comet that broke up and hit Jupiter 15 years ago.

[edit on 26-7-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Jul, 26 2009 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by fieryjaguarpaw
Well we have two droids running around on the surface of mars, one lander (that is now dead) and how many craft orbiting the red planet?
But on the other hand we don't have anyone on a professional level looking at Jupiter? Not even with a small scope like the one I assume this amature used?

There are in fact some scientists who study Jupiter on a full-time basis -- it's just that they are not necessarily studying it by looking at it through a telescope.

Some scientists continue to study the data from Jupiter gathered by the Galileo Space probe, even though the probe was de-orbited (i.e., burned-up) in the atmosphere of Jupiter almost 6 years ago. The mounds of data collected by the Galileo spacecraft will keep scientists busy studying Jupiter and its moons for many years to come.



[edit on 7/26/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 26 2009 @ 10:22 PM
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Interesting enough the spot is growing in size - triple the size as a few days ago now.




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