Scientists discover new way to mend a broken heart (heart damage/disease)

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posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 07:15 PM
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BBC

This is potentialy a great discovery.


Scientists say they have found a new way to mend damage to the heart.

When cells turn into fully-formed adult heart muscle they stop dividing, and cannot replace tissue damaged by disease or deformity.

But a US team have found a way to coax the cells to start dividing again, raising hopes they could be used to regenerate healthy tissue.

Iit goes on to say:


It has long been thought that the heart was incapable of repairing itself.

Heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) proliferate during prenatal development, but were thought to lose that ability shortly after birth.

However, recent research has indicated that the adult cells do have some ability to replace themselves at a low level.

The latest study provides firm evidence that this is true - and that NRG1 can ramp up the process significantly.

The Boston team tested the ability of various molecules to spur cell division in cultured cardiomyocytes, including several factors known to drive proliferation of the cells during prenatal development.


This is especially good for me as heart disease runs on my mothers side of the family.


[edit on 23-7-2009 by kiwifoot]




posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 07:21 PM
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Interesting.... no link so I had to look it up.

esciencenews.com...


The key ingredient is a growth factor known as neuregulin1 (NRG1 for short), and the researchers suggest that the factor might one day be used to treat failing human hearts. "To my knowledge, this is the first regenerative therapy that may be applicable in a systemic way," said Bernhard Kühn of Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School. For instance, he added, people might one day go to the clinic for daily infusions of NRG1 over a period of weeks. "In principle, there is nothing to preclude this going into the clinic. Based on the all the information we have, this is a promising candidate." He emphasized, however, that further studies would be required to demonstrate safety before such treatment could be tested in human patients.



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by infolurker
 


Arrghhh sorry, a bit late over here!

I've added the link now.



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 07:34 PM
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Heart Disease can be prevented by eating right, in most cases, regardless of genetic predisposition. So make sure and eat plenty of fat and protein and limit the carbs and you'll be fine.


Good find.
It would be great treatment for those of whom can't afford to eat healthily and stop the through preventative measures.

-Dev



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Very true mate.

I'm the only one in my family that doesn't smoke, I run(back permitting) at least twice a week. I try and eat well.

My Grandparents on my mums side both had heart disease and died of it, my Mum has Angina and two of her siblings died of heart attacks. Saying that they ( my family) don't seem too bothered!

The funny thing about heart disease is you can be skinny and fit looking on the outside, but your heart could be buggered!



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 08:02 PM
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Originally posted by kiwifoot
reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


The funny thing about heart disease is you can be skinny and fit looking on the outside, but your heart could be buggered!


There are many different factors that can contribute to those types of situations, including other diseases; however, most of it is contributed to poor diet. Genetic factors play a significant role in how/where the body stores fat. If, for instance, an individual had less insulin receptors on his fat cells than a normal individual then fat deposition would be minimal, thereby creating a false sense of healthiness based on the fact that the number one indicator of heart disease is obesity/fat gain.

Unfortunately, these individuals are still susceptible to the harmful effects of a poor diet, sans fat gain.

Hope that makes sense. S&F, my friend.


-Dev



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 



Yeah, great info , thanks mate.

You know your stuff!

It's like you said, all the relatives I mentioned were slim and healthy looking, I guess it's one of the few times it pays to be fat, you can see something is wrong.

Thanks again mate.


[edit on 23-7-2009 by kiwifoot]





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