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General Christain talk.... Music, doctrine, etc. All civil replies welcome!

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posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by pdpayne0418
 


Thank you for shareing that with us. Like the title of the post says, "All civil replies welcome!" That means if you are not of the faith or you're an athiest, welcome but be nice and non-critical. I'd star your post if I had the choice.




posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Badmedia, thank you for the quick reply.
That was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for clarifying it for me.
I have more questions now.

1) This software stores atomic data (actual "cat", "butt", etc.) in tables, right? They are not somehow embedded in vectors?

2) If I have 20 billion atomic values and one such vector ("The dog killed the cat", for example), this vector will have 19,999,999,997 zeroes in it, each for an absent atomic entry. Each such vector has to be parsed entirely to determine whether or not it has all other atomic values. Such parses will take several hours each. Is this correct? How is this addressed performance-wise?

3) Both kinds of vectors are stored: base vector containing all values and multiple individual vectors? If I want to find a vector that is close to another vector I have to scan 20,000,000,000 rows atomic table, then find values and scan 20 billion vectors? How is this astronomical inefficiency and space requirements resolved?

Thanks.

Walter.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by walterkatz
reply to post by badmedia
 


Badmedia, thank you for the quick reply.
That was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for clarifying it for me.
I have more questions now.

1) This software stores atomic data (actual "cat", "butt", etc.) in tables, right? They are not somehow embedded in vectors?


How people do it will vary. I personally keep a table with those, and the values for quicker and easier lookup, rather than looping through an entire array/vector for the appropriate key. So, rather than looking across the array/vector for a match on a word, I just search the table and get the value for it.

If memory permits, then I might load the base keys into a hash, and then use the keys to get the value(same thing as the above in effect, just faster because in memory rather than searching a table).



2) If I have 20 billion atomic values and one such vector ("The dog killed the cat", for example), this vector will have 19,999,999,997 zeroes in it, each for an absent atomic entry. Each such vector has to be parsed entirely to determine whether or not it has all other atomic values. Such parses will take several hours each. Is this correct? How is this addressed performance-wise?


Well, the english language only has 1 million words total counting scientific words, around 600,000 without them. So, that is quite a bit short of 20 billion, even if you include many of the other languages.

But in such a case you would likely use caches of existing results to speed things up. So that rather than doing the intensive action over and over, we can just read a cache.

As well, it is pretty simple to create a vector/array that has a bunch of zero's in it. All you do is say create array(number of entries in it). Null will be a value of 0, and then you just define the individual values that do exist into the specific slots. I honestly just use a little mod that someone else created to do this, rather than doing it myself. No point in reinventing the wheel IMO.



3) Both kinds of vectors are stored: base vector containing all values and multiple individual vectors? If I want to find a vector that is close to another vector I have to scan 20,000,000,000 rows atomic table, then find values and scan 20 billion vectors? How is this astronomical inefficiency and space requirements resolved?


Well when you get databases that are that big, you are going to have to do things behind the scenes and such to get better efficiency. I've honestly never had any kind of database even near to that kind of number, and when my databases get too big, they are usually somekind of logging and so I just trim them up.

In such a case as that big of a number, I might just keep a key stored which can be converted into a vector on the fly to save space. It's really hard to say because I've never been faced with the situation myself.

So, rather than have 20 billion zero's, I might just say place=value, and only store the values.

So if Dog is stored in vector 2, and has 1 occurance, I would save just that part 2=1, etc.

But what you have to keep in mind is what you are replacing that with. That is a huge amount of entries and such. But look at what that is in replace of. If it wasn't that number you were using, you are looking at searching the entire database for matches on words. In the end, it should prove more efficient.

Wish I could give you better answers, but I really don't know since I've never been faced with such problems. I could be way off and there may be much better ways of doing it. In programming, there are always multiple solutions to a problem.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by Locoman8
 




Originally posted by locoman8
I don't know why it took so long for me but I finally added you as a friend. And thank you for adding me. I mentioned movies on this thread and then noticed that you started your own thread on inspirational movies so I'm going to check it out.


My mother did our family tree a few years ago and all my ancestors, going back for hundreds of years on my farther and mother’s side, are all Scottish and I was also born in Scotland. Many of my male ancestors have had the name Joseph, as do I. I noticed your thread “Josephs birthright” but I don’t know too much about the history, to make any useful comments lol anyway…thanks for adding me as a friend…


- JC


[edit on 19-8-2009 by Joecroft]

[edit on 19-8-2009 by Joecroft]



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by Joecroft
 


Joseph was one of the youngest sons of Jacob in the old testament. He was hated by his brothers and sold to the egyptians where he became a servant. The Pharoah made him governor of Egypt after he prophecied 7 years of wealth and prosperity followed by 7 years of famine... Joseph told the Pharoah to ration what is produced so they will last through the 7 year famine. Joseph's brothers came into Egypt to beg for food during this famine only to find out they were at the mercy of their brother. This is ultimately how the ancient Israelites ended up in Egypt. The birthright of Joseph is that of two nations. One multitude of nations (Great Britain) and one single powerful nation (USA). Their ancient Isralie tribe names are Ephraim (Britain) and Manasseh (USA), the two children of Joseph. Read Genesis chapter 48-50 to get the full grasp of the actual wording of the birthright. Then research a people by the name of the "Scythians" which emerged in the same place the ten northern tribes of Israel were exiled at around the same time they were exiled. It's believed that the Scythians and Celts were ancient Israeli decendents. One prophecy is that of the exiled Israelites migrating to an island northwest of the holy land. Look at Great Britain in comparison to the Holy Land. It's northwest of Israel. Also, they would emerge as major maritime people. The British Empire fits best with Ephraim (multitude of nations) seeing that it once controlled nearly 1/3 of earth's land mass. USA fits best with Manasseh (Unified Great Nation) as it came from the multitude of Britain. I need to revamp that thread and give more explanation. But there's the jist of it.



posted on Aug, 22 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by Locoman8
 



This is not exactly Christian music, but it is very spiritual…

…couldn’t find a decent Peter Gabriel version…so found this instead...




- JC



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