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Celebrating Cronkite

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posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 09:11 AM
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"The Vietcong did not win by a knockout [in the Tet Offensive], but neither did we. The referees of history may make it a draw. . . . We have been too often disappointed by the optimism of the American leaders, both in Vietnam and Washington, to have faith any longer in the silver linings they find in the darkest clouds. . . .


Source


"For it seems now more certain than ever that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate. . . . To say that we are closer to victory today is to believe, in the face of the evidence, the optimists who have been wrong in the past" -- Walter Cronkite, CBS Evening News, February 27, 1968.



Tellingly, his most celebrated and significant moment -- Greg Mitchell says "this broadcast would help save many thousands of lives, U.S. and Vietnamese, perhaps even a million" -- was when he stood up and announced that Americans shouldn't trust the statements being made about the war by the U.S. Government and military, and that the specific claims they were making were almost certainly false. In other words, Cronkite's best moment was when he did exactly that which the modern journalist today insists they must not ever do -- directly contradict claims from government and military officials and suggest that such claims should not be believed. These days, our leading media outlets won't even use words that are disapproved of by the Government.


I grew up watching Walter Cronkite on the evening news. They pushed him too hard a couple times and he told the people the truth. I'm not saying he was a saint. What I'm saying is that it's a sad thing that no one in MSM will say anything against TPTB anymore.


What do I regret? Well, I regret that in our attempt to establish some standards, we didn't make them stick. We couldn't find a way to pass them on to another generation.


Definitely the end of an era.

[edit on 21-7-2009 by KSPigpen]




posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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This particular end of an era is a good thing.

Trusting the reporting of one or very few sources is a thing of the past.

If anything TPTB would love to go back to the simpler times of Walter Cronkite.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by RRconservative
This particular end of an era is a good thing.

Trusting the reporting of one or very few sources is a thing of the past.

If anything TPTB would love to go back to the simpler times of Walter Cronkite.


To a certain extent, I agree with you. We didn't used to HAVE all the different sources. Sometimes it's pretty difficult to come to a conclusion because there are so many sources...I wouldn't want to go back either...but I DO wish there were more people, in places of influence and exposure, that would stand up and tell the government that they're full of it.



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