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New NASA Images Indicate Object Hits Jupiter

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posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 10:12 PM
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New NASA Images Indicate Object Hits Jupiter


www.jpl.nasa.gov

Scientists have found evidence that another object has bombarded Jupiter, exactly 15 years after the first impacts by the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9.

Following up on a tip by an amateur astronomer, Anthony Wesley of Australia, that a new dark "scar" had suddenly appeared on Jupiter, this morning between 3 and 9 a.m. PDT (6 a.m. and noon EDT) scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, gathered evidence indicating an impact.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 10:12 PM
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I was not aware of scientists tracking anything approaching Jupiter. This seems to have been a surprise. Must have been huge what ever it was. A comet most likely.


New infrared images show the likely impact point was near the south polar region, with a visibly dark "scar" and bright upwelling particles in the upper atmosphere detected in near-infrared wavelengths, and a warming of the upper troposphere with possible extra emission from ammonia gas detected at mid-infrared wavelengths




www.jpl.nasa.gov
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 10:48 PM
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ooooo could this be black-ops Lucifer Project in action??

i mean 15 yrs to the day!

//speculatin'//

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posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 10:51 PM
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Humanity should be thankful of our Jovian protector....its gravity well has sucked up many things that could very well have hit US instead. Something like that impacting the earth (or any of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts) would have spelled near instant extinction for the human race as well as probably all non-microbial life on the planet.

Still its enormously fun to watch and keep track of. Space is so full of well...STUFF....always more to find, new things to discover. Mankind is generally an inquisitive bunch and we'll always be driven to know more, after all isn't that why we're on a conspiracy theorist site? To ponder things that aren't mainstream and mundane? I find this sort of thing MUCH more interesting than American Idol or finding out what star is sleeping with what other star's wife.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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Originally posted by outlander6436
or finding out what star is sleeping with what other star's wife.


well Earth might just be 'sleeping' with both 'stars' ...SOL and LUCIFER if this is what I'm speculatively suggesting it is


so there's some 'star' gossip for ya that's intriguing!



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posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 11:14 PM
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It's funny that before Shoemaker-Levy, a lot of people didn't believe that big impacts still happened to planets. Obviously they do, and we are glad Jupiter sucks up a lot of objects but we'll get hit by one again sooner or later.

Just think of what would have had happened if the Tunguska event had happened over Moscow or New York City instead of the middle of nowhere?



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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I posted in another thread about this impact yesterday when it was announced by the amateur astronomer...

But til now, i didn't realize that the SL-9 impacts were right at the same time 15 years ago.

Wow... that's uber creepy lol



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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If they missed this one coming in what that means to me is they could very easily miss one headed for earth and not notice till Impact, that’s a little bit scary if you ask me!



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by Jomina
I posted in another thread about this impact yesterday when it was announced by the amateur astronomer...

But til now, i didn't realize that the SL-9 impacts were right at the same time 15 years ago.

Wow... that's uber creepy lol


Yeah and what's up with this comment? from the op's link to the Nasa site:




"We were extremely lucky to be seeing Jupiter at exactly the right time, the right hour, the right side of Jupiter to witness the event. We couldn't have planned it better," said Glenn Orton, a scientist at JPL.


What's up with that comment, besides it was an amateur, or an unofficial skywatcher, who first detected this, not them. Why don't they give credit where credit is due?



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 01:24 AM
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Originally posted by star in a jar






"We were extremely lucky to be seeing Jupiter at exactly the right time, the right hour, the right side of Jupiter to witness the event. We couldn't have planned it better," said Glenn Orton, a scientist at JPL.


What's up with that comment, besides it was an amateur, or an unofficial skywatcher, who first detected this, not them. Why don't they give credit where credit is due?




i think he was speaking in a general sense.. meaning "we" as in everybody on earth who is viewing these shots from wherever they're taken from... he's glad in that jupiter that specific area of jupiter is facing us for us to see it.

granted.. it could very well be surface-talk .. where they have other methods of observing the giant planet from other desirable angles at any point.

who knows what behind-the-veil technology is floating around..

but i'm pretty sure that's what he meant to say.. "we" as in anybody who could have seen it..
and the Australian astronomer is the one of "us" who did.

so they say..
notice how all these incredible phenomena is the responsibility of non-agency groups to capture and show the public?

it's like.. "see even an amateur finds the coolest stuff.. so all amateurs would be able to see anything strange up there!"..yadda yadda

etc..

-





[edit on 21-7-2009 by prevenge]

[edit on 21-7-2009 by prevenge]



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 01:43 AM
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As spectacualar as this news is, tis nothing really new..it is to us as humans, becuase we doont live thier on jupiter, and dont see things like this on a yearly basis.
Jupiter in fact, is known to astronomers as the solar systems vaccum cleaner, if you will. Where it is in orbit, and its size along with its gravity, often does scoop up or attract passing bojects, such as asteroids. Jupiters gravity simplay catches these objects and brings em in. IN fact, some specualte if it wasnt for jupiter, the earth would have been bombarded or hit by a good size comet or asteroid eons ago.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by paradiselost333
 


I would think we would have some kind of advanced warning if it involved a comet. Someone would notice it before it actually got so close as to impact earth. But even with an advanced warning, we wouldn't necessarily have a way of deflecting it. Alot of the methods scientists are talking about now sound great on paper but they haven't even been developed yet. Most of them are just ideas and sketches on a drawing board. Not exactly reassuring. IMO, the scarier things are what don't sprout a tail to give them away and we could easily be hit by a rogue asteroid with zero warning beforehand.

I've always wondered where all the water came from to produce all these comets that are supposedly emanating from areas of space like the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt. We have alot of comets these days. Imagine how many were around around the time the Solar System was forming. It makes you wonder how all that water really got there. Especially since there doesn't seem to be anything around the Oort Cloud that could explain this other than the comets themselves. Also makes you wonder where all of earth's water really came from.

Alot of scientists thought Shoemaker-Levy 9 was an extremely rare cosmic event. It seems planetary impacts aren't so rare after all. And we can say that with a little more certainty now after we've witnessed 2 impacts in just a short span of a few years.

But I guess it's also true that having almost no advanced warning of a comet/asteroid impact on such a distant planet as Jupiter isn't really the same as a similar object approaching earth. We would probably have at least some advanced warning beforehand. The question is whether or not the world could agree on a strategy, pay for it, develop it, implement it, and then deal with the threat so-long as there'd even be enough time do so at that point. Simply nuking an object wouldn't necessarily remove the threat or deflect it. It would all depend on the variables. Size, shape, density, axes' of rotation, etc.. It could just turn into a giant cluster-bomb and kill more people that way.

-ChriS



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 02:02 AM
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I have trouble accepting Jupiter as just a gas giant if it's been sucking up so much matter for millions or billions of years. Are planets just cast offs or ejections of collected materials from gas clouds?

It wasn't that long ago that our moon was struck. Some may have thought that was a UFO or explosion on some base. I am surprised we aren't hit more often, regardless of Jupiter. It may just be we're headed into a cycle the Jupiter can no longer protect us.

What does geological history suggest and with statistics as with cyclical events



As delusional as it may sound, I was led to believe by what I've thought was remote viewing, was that Jupiters atmosphere is some type of protective barrier by a more highly advanced humanoid race with larger eyes. That would be fascinating if it were actually true. This type of scenario has been suggested in science fiction programs as well.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by ziggy1706
As spectacualar as this news is, tis nothing really new..it is to us as humans, becuase we doont live thier on jupiter, and dont see things like this on a yearly basis.
Jupiter in fact, is known to astronomers as the solar systems vaccum cleaner, if you will. Where it is in orbit, and its size along with its gravity, often does scoop up or attract passing bojects, such as asteroids. Jupiters gravity simplay catches these objects and brings em in. IN fact, some specualte if it wasnt for jupiter, the earth would have been bombarded or hit by a good size comet or asteroid eons ago.


Let me get this straight...
You HONESTLY think that the people discussing this event, HADN'T initially considered everything you just said before they posted?
I mean really.. you think that you're somehow enlightening us with this elementary knowledge?

Yes, Jupiter is the second largest body in our Solar System.
Yest it attracts random debris that may otherwise eventually collide with other random debris and/or planets..

But to observe a major impact 15 years to the day after the last known recorded major impact?
BOTH while the impact site on the side of the planet is FACING us, allowing us to see it?
come now..

we understand what you're saying.. it's a given.

-



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 02:28 AM
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reply to post by ziggy1706
 


Yes, we know that the larger planets of the outer solar system basically shield the inner solar system from transitting bodies. But this is still a major event. Even if we don't have all the details yet (and we might learn more as the days progress) this speaks volumes about how frequent these impact events really are. Until Shoemaker-Levy 9 we had no idea. And even after, we had no way of knowing how frequent these things really happened. At least we now have a more accurate idea of how often these impacts occur in our solar system and how vigilant we should be about keeping a lookout for these kinds of objects for our own well-being.

Until Shoemaker-Levy 9 we had very few people actually looking for potential impactors headed towards earth. The only reason Shoemaker and Levy discovered their comet was because of the sky survey they were conducting. If they hadn't discovered it, we could've had almost no warning about that Jupiter impact either. All I'm saying.. It was basically discovered by accident.

It's quite possible some amateur with a 10" schmidt cassegrain telescope could accidentally discover a new comet or asteroid headed towards earth that noone's seen before. IMO, we just don't have enough people looking for these kinds of objects and because of that we are always vulnerable. Just how vulnerable depends on how close we can statistically gauge the frequency of these events and we can only do that by being aware of these impacts.

All this makes you wonder how many times this has happened without us having any knowledge at all.

-ChriS



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 05:18 AM
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What a lot of people also fail to realise is that our own Moon frequently gets hit by meteoric/cometary debris. Infact look outside during any Meteor display and when the Moon is in its crescent phase you might just occasionally see a small flash of light on its surface (depending what optics your using.)
Lunar meteor strikes HAVE been recently recorded and are more frequent than mass-event types such as the Shoemaker event or the recent collision with Jupiter.
We on Earth have to thank our atmosphere for burning up most Debris before it hits our surface, although obviously larger collisions are inevitably going to happen at sometime.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 06:53 AM
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Please pardon my ignorance but I had the belief that Jupiter has no solid ground for something to crash on?
I read reports of crash and impact, anybody knows what it is crashing into?



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 06:59 AM
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The fact that this collision was picked up by an Aussie backyarder instead of NASA/JPL or a major observatory proves that there just doesn't seem to be enough interest as there should be in rogue comets and asteroids.


We couldn't have planned it better," said Glenn Orton, a scientist at JPL.


Planned? Ahem!

IRM


[edit on 21/7/09 by InfaRedMan]



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 07:41 AM
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I wonder if it could have been a mass of dark matter, that hit Jupiter?
Can dark matter exist in a such a size?



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 08:05 AM
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Originally posted by paradiselost333
If they missed this one coming in what that means to me is they could very easily miss one headed for earth and not notice till Impact, that’s a little bit scary if you ask me!


It is a bit scary to think that nobody saw this coming. It surely would have destroyed life on Earth if hit us.

I used to think there was a team of scientists scanning the sky for potential impacts but the reality is there is just way too much space to cover. If something was to head our way we will not have much time to do anything about it.




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