Three Gorges Dam in China–Largest in World – Serious Problems? Affects the Whole Earth

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posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by Paroxysm
 


Thank you so much for your investigational skills because i was wondering about this source aswell...


well, guess i've ended up reading worthless GLP threads to know what QA is talking about.....

That's a big star for your perseverance...

Peace




posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 07:41 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by Paroxysm
 


i appreciate your efforts but they can't do anything about this thread just as much as the MOD's can't do anything about my wonderful (
)Cumbre Vieja on La Palma – Serious Problems? Affects the Whole Earth thread

Why?? because it has no invalid info in it. The fact that people can look these things up for themselfs on the www doesn't mean it can be prohibited on here.

The fact that i make hints and connections to an other thread which might make this thread more doom and gloom doesn't mean it is....

I, myself, have decided to steer far and clear from prediction threads...

Peace



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 08:19 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by operation mindcrime
I, myself, have decided to steer far and clear from prediction threads...


I will repeat:

It would be much easier for you as a user (of this board) to actually do that, if all "prediction threads" were kept in a specific forum. They could even call that forum "Predictions" to avoid confusion. If only we had such a place...


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 08:57 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 09:08 PM
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I found another article of interest written about Three Gorges Dam last year.

link: www.scientificamerican.com...


SHANGHAI—For over three decades the Chinese government dismissed warnings from scientists and environmentalists that its Three Gorges Dam—the world's largest—had the potential of becoming one of China's biggest environmental nightmares. But last fall, denial suddenly gave way to reluctant acceptance that the naysayers were right. Chinese officials staged a sudden about-face, acknowledging for the first time that the massive hydroelectric dam, sandwiched between breathtaking cliffs on the Yangtze River in central China, may be triggering landslides, altering entire ecosystems and causing other serious environmental problems—and, by extension, endangering the millions who live in its shadow.


The article is four pages long - but it is worth the read. It was written last year.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 10:14 PM
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Landslides have stopped shipping traffic at various times.

english.cri.cn...



About 20,000 cubic meters of rock and mud flowed into the Yangtze River following a landslide in the Three Gorges Dam area Monday, but no casualties have been reported.

The landslide happened on the northern bank of Wuxia Gorge, one of the Three Gorges, at around 1:40 a.m. Monday, the maritime affairs department in southwestern Chongqing Municipality said in a press release Tuesday.

The incident did not obstruct Yangtze shipping routes and water traffic was normal Tuesday, it said.

Maritime authorities imposed a five-hour traffic ban near the Wuxia Gorge after the landslide, affecting 45 vessels. The ban was lifted at 7:15 a.m. Monday after experts ruled out risks of further landslides.

The maritime bureau is monitoring the dam area around the clock.

A similar landslide was reported in the area on Nov. 23, when about 50,000 cubic meters of rock flowed into the Yangtze and water traffic was stopped for two days.




It looks like they did not account for all the landslides, they had predicted some - but they are bigger than the predictions - wonder how much more sediment that creates, besides the 700 million tons created already annually.






[edit on 25-7-2009 by questioningall]



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


english.cri.cn...

Did you even go to the website you just linked? You would of had to, because you just copy, and pasted text from the website linked, right?

Did you fail to see the first few lines of text posted on that website/article?? They are in a completely different color than the rest of the text so they DO stand out. Well you forgot to paste them with the rest of it, let me help you:



The landslide is seen on the northern bank of Wuxia Gorge, one of the Three Gorges in southwestern Chongqing Municipality on Monday, May 18, 2009. The landslide sent 20,000 cubic meters of mountain mass into the Yangtze River.[Photo: Chongqing Times]


Having forgot to post the Date reference for said landslide someone might read your post and think this just happened. That would be called misinformation...






[edit on 25-7-2009 by Paroxysm]



posted on Jul, 26 2009 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by Paroxysm
 


You mean something like this???

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Different thread same tactics.......

It is actually very easy and doesn't take up a lot of time.....


Peace



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:00 AM
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I found a very interesting article from 2007 - just as all the articles I find are from all dates about what is happening.

link : www.ftpress.com...


The Three Gorges Dam Disaster Waiting to Happen

The Three Gorges Dam Disaster Waiting to Happen
Peter NavarroPosted September 27, 2007

Topics: Global Business, Finance & Investing

I heartily recommend the series of articles that have appeared in the Wall Street Journal on the mushrooming hazards associated with the Three Gorges Dam project in China. More broadly, this excerpt from my book The Coming China Wars provides an overview of the many dangers associated with China's highly aggressive program to dam all its rivers.

Dam happy. That’s the only way to describe China’s water-management policy. At more than 85,000 dams and counting, Chinese leaders boast of having the tallest dams, the largest by reservoir capacity, the dam with the highest ship lift, and the most powerful electricity producer. From arch dams, earthen dams, and gravity dams to cascade and concrete-faced rockfill dams, China has it all.

China should not be boasting about dams. Instead, China’s top leadership may well want to reconsider the perilous path it has chosen to take. For if ever there were a double-edged sword, a large dam strategy would be it. On the beneficial edge of that sword, large dams generate significant amounts of cheap electricity. They store water when there is a surplus for use in irrigation during times of scarcity. They protect arable land from flood and soil erosion. They can help promote aquaculture and fisheries development as well as tourism, recreation, and inland navigation. They can even change the local climate (for better or worse) by increasing humidity and precipitation.2

On the other far more costly and dangerous edge of the sword, large dams are quite capable over time of destroying the very waters they harness as well as the agricultural lands they are trying to improve. Because dams tend to slow down river flows, they decrease the ability of rivers to rejuvenate and cleanse themselves of pollutants naturally. They interfere with, and often destroy, natural habitats and fish reproduction. The reservoirs created by large dams displace significant population segments when they inundate villages and towns. Archaeological sites are literally drowned.

Perhaps the worst aspect of large dams is their relatively short useful shelf life. As silt builds up behind a dam and the reservoir becomes shallower and shallower, less electricity is generated, less water for irrigation is stored, and flood control becomes increasingly more difficult. Last, but hardly least, is the possibility of a catastrophic accident should a dam be breached and collapse and send a roaring wave of water downriver on a devastating path of destruction.

For all of the reasons mentioned previously, and based on significant historical experience, most environmentalists now believe that large dams often represent an unacceptable risk, particularly over the long term.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


Well they need power, they're in the middle of their industrial revolution similar to that of the UK in the late 1800's and the US during WW2.

They could use a cascade of smaller dams akin to locks on a canal maybe, but then of course shipping along the river would likely need to be rerouted ?

At least they're trying to generate with renewable energy though, you have to commend on their efforts in that part instead they could have just built hundreds of coal fueled powerplants which would probably be even more of an environmental disaster.

Then there's the option of nuclear power but with their track record in the health & safety department the effects of having a shed load of nuclear powerplants going meltdown would far outweight the damage from this single dam.

Adding more information to your thread won't make any difference though QA you've already highlighted the issue, why not instead put your efforts into looking for solutions that we can all discuss ?



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:33 AM
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reply to post by h3akalee
 


I'm afraid your question is lost on me. I've been a member here for months, and as a PhD biochemist, I have been working daily to contribute to the thread on the influenza outbreak, in an attempt, as a specialist in infectious disease, to lend what information I can, in order to assist others who might have questions, and to learn from those who may have information I don't have.

The thread on the 3 Gorges Dam was interesting to me- and when I went back and read other posts by the same OP I found myself reading the work of a very accomplished researcher.

I don't agree with all she posts; I do however, have nothing but respect for her diligence in support of her material, and I find her posts to be most interesting.

Regarding this topic, I felt I had something to offer, because while I am in no way an astrophysicist or ANY physicist, I've taken about 6-8 years of it, and am exceedingly interested in what a man-made structure of this magnitude might do to the planet.

The presence of a solar eclipse added fuel to my fire, as all solar eclipses exert pressure on the earth- and I am curious to see if ther was anything that could be observed during the eclipse- tidal movement, etc., throughout the river and the various dams on it.

If I were "tolling" as I think you said, would it not indicate a non-member, reading information? Please, with breathlessness, do tell me.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Sir or Madam:

My name is CultureD. Not "Oh Cultured One". I have taken this name as I am a biochemist- you have chosen to make it a joke at my expense.

I would feel sad for myself if I weren't too busy feeling sad for you- and your attempt at spelling and grammar.

I am asking you- once more, and politely, to desist from attacking me personally. When I joined ATS I read a great deal about the requirements of manners and decorum- and as a person who has visited Embassies, toiled for the Government, risked horrendous disease, etc., in an attempt to keep people "safe", I am beginning to wonder if my work had value--if people like you would blithely swallow my medicine in an emergency, and then turn round to insult me. It makes me happy to have left my field for greener pastures, knowing you're on your own when the autumn flu returns with a vengeance.
Good luck to you- you've alienated a valuable resource.



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by RogerT
 


Your input is kind and thoughtful.

I've not joined ATS to preach, nor to bolster my ego by spouting allopathy or any other kind of medicinal cures.

I've come to engage in dialogue with others- to share what I know, and to learn from the many here. My ego- while rightfully in place has nothing to do with my posts. My problem (of which I am very aware!) is that I expect a lot of people- I like a heated debate- I am disgusted by personal attacks.

Each of us has a strong opinion- this is the very reason I joined. And I have a thick skin- after the bench I spent 6 years as a global sales manager for a Japanese drug development firm-I'm not afraid of people.

The issue I take is the sarcasm and churlish remarks- not the disagreement with my posts! I'm not always right- nor is any of us! I had hoped, however, that here I would find some kind of group who seek enlightenment through multiple channels- and I'm hitting brick walls everywhere I go.

I don't mince words and may come off as, well, off-putting- but I don't attack PEOPLE. I question ideas, revel in them, and learn- I share what i can based on my own experience, and hope for the best- maybe I can help save ONE life on the flu boards. Maybe I can open ONE mind- maybe someone will open MY mind to something I hadn't considered.....

But if we act like punks, none of it matters--hence my dissatisfaction- not tears



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by CultureD
reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Sir or Madam:


It's sir, sir.


My name is CultureD. Not "Oh Cultured One".


Touchy, touchy....did i hit a nerve?? I do humbly apologize if you interpreted this as an insult!! In my culture it is regarded as a compliment when one is adressed as "oh ..... one". I have been called "oh mindcrimed one" and it gave me a good feeling for an entire week....


I would feel sad for myself if I weren't too busy feeling sad for you- and your attempt at spelling and grammar.


Now that could be regarded as an insult given the fact that i'm not english and my native tongue isn't either. My hunger to communicate with people all over the world made me learn english and without spelling check or dictonary, i think i'm doing a pretty good job at communication in foreign language......

But i won't feel insulted because i have a pretty thick skin and understand my grammar could come across as disturbing.


I am asking you- once more, and politely, to desist from attacking me personally. When I joined ATS I read a great deal about the requirements of manners and decorum- and as a person who has visited Embassies, toiled for the Government, risked horrendous disease, etc., in an attempt to keep people "safe", I am beginning to wonder if my work had value--if people like you would blithely swallow my medicine in an emergency, and then turn round to insult me. It makes me happy to have left my field for greener pastures, knowing you're on your own when the autumn flu returns with a vengeance.


Apart from the "oh Cultured one" (which doesn't seem like an attack??) could you please, please, please show me were, in my posts, i have attacked you???


Good luck to you- you've alienated a valuable resource.


Well atleast you are a humble man!!! I can appreciate that....


Peace (i still mean it!!)



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks for your input- I'll re-review it and dissect your meaning. Hopefully I'll be able to find some white papers to support my claim.

Appreciate your input



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 08:59 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 27 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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Further off topic posts WILL be accompanied with warn flags.





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