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Liquid Breathing ?

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posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 03:37 AM
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Today somehow this picture of a mouse "breathing" underwater from a few years back came to my mind.
tauchen.nullzeit.at...

It was big news here in Germany, I don`t know about the US and the rest of the world.
So I googled liquid breathing and stumbled across a pretty interesting article on wikipedia about its proposed uses in medical treatment, diving and space travel.
For those of you who are interested:
en.wikipedia.org...
Hope you enjoy it.




posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 03:56 AM
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reminds me of the scene in "the abyss"

great movie.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 04:04 AM
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reply to post by grantbeed
 


Yeah, Abyss was a great movie. I would have never considered it possible to do this in real life.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 04:51 AM
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i remember seeing this on a science program in uk a long time ago.

apparently , what you are seeing, is a mouse breathing in a fluid that was used to clean computer keyboards, but they found that it was breathable.

now, it was a long time ago i seen this, i would deffinitelly be more than 8 years ago, start of the 2000's, possibly a bit later... i never ever seen anything about it again but always remembered, im just thinking now, was it maybe a prank or was it actualy true?!?! (dam ats, making me question everything LOL)



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 05:00 AM
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We have the ability to liquid breath. How did we get air while we were in the womb? We breathed liquid and there have been tests done by the Miltary on a super inriched air liquid that you breath.

These tests were looking at solving the issues of breathing a gas very deep in the oceans.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 05:15 AM
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reply to post by Freedom ERP
 




We have the ability to liquid breath. How did we get air while we were in the womb?


I am not a doctor or a scientist, but I think the fetus gets its oxygen from the mother through the umbilical cord. That's what my logic tells me, but I might be wrong....



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 05:20 AM
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Grantbeed you took the words right out of my mouth when I read the thread



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by boaby_phet
 


I don`t think it was a prank. There were articles in pretty established and I consider trustable magazines here back then.
The substance which makes the effect possible is Perfluorcarbon as I understand it.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 05:56 AM
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reply to post by Ysterlong
 


My medically mind wife has corrected me so you are right Ysterlong.

The concept of liquid breathing is one that the Military have looked at

www.chm.bris.ac.uk...



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:03 AM
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Originally posted by derpif
reply to post by grantbeed
 


Yeah, Abyss was a great movie. I would have never considered it possible to do this in real life.


You did it for 9 months already ya tad pole....


Good find....Peace



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:08 AM
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This is pretty cool,one thing i have always thought was strange that came to my mind when reading the title(a tad off topic) is why scuba divers etc still have *old school* oxygen tanks...surely i would have thought in this day and age there would be technology to extract/filter oxygen from the water to breath by now..maybe isn't possible but it sounds plausible,maybe not enough gets filtered fast enough...sorry i know its off topic



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by Ysterlong
reply to post by Freedom ERP
 




We have the ability to liquid breath. How did we get air while we were in the womb?


I am not a doctor or a scientist, but I think the fetus gets its oxygen from the mother through the umbilical cord. That's what my logic tells me, but I might be wrong....





Amniotic Fluid--the Basics

by Elisa Ross, MD
reviewed by Marjorie Greenfield, M.D.
Amniotic fluid surrounds and cushions a baby all through her development. In an ultrasound, it appears that the baby is swimming in the fluid. In fact, in addition to cushioning the baby, amniotic fluid also helps in the maturation of some of her organs. While your baby gets her oxygen through the umbilical cord she also "breathes" fluid into her lungs, which helps them to expand. And babies swallow amniotic fluid into their stomachs, giving the digestive system some practice before milk is introduced after birth.

Where does amniotic fluid come from?
Early in the pregnancy, the placenta produces amniotic fluid. Later on, about the fourth month or so, the baby's kidneys start to work, and then the amniotic fluid is made there. Although the kidneys ultimately are responsible for filtering waste products out of the blood and making urine, amniotic fluid is not urine as we think of it. The majority of the baby's waste products actually are transported through the placenta to the mother's circulation and are then filtered by her kidneys. This cycle repeats on a regular basis as the baby swallows fluid and releases it through her urinary system, and so on.

The baby does secrete some substances and shed fetal skin cells into the amniotic fluid. This is important because sometimes when we need to get information about the fetus' condition, we perform amniocentesis and analyze the fluid's contents.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by Solomons
 


Divers may not have it, but come on....you know the military has it.

I mean all they would have to do is study how gills retain oxygen, and I'm sure that has been done.

Good point though all together....

Peace



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:25 AM
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reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I was surprised to hear that when in the womb a fetus is covered in hair then it sheds it and eats it...strange.
Your right no doubt the military have it,but you would think there would be some commerical product by now..given our technology it doesn't seem like such a hard task.I should have searched, it seems an israeli scientist figured it out and it shows hope to be used by scuba divers! news.bbc.co.uk...



[edit on 18-7-2009 by Solomons]



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
reply to post by Solomons
 


Divers may not have it, but come on....you know the military has it.

I mean all they would have to do is study how gills retain oxygen, and I'm sure that has been done.

Good point though all together....

Peace


Yeahhhhhhh....simple! I don't know why we havent figured this out decades ago. /sarcasm



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
While your baby gets her oxygen through the umbilical cord she also "breathes" fluid into her lungs, which helps them to expand.


Note the use of quotation marks around the word 'breathes'. In this context, this usage denotes a metaphorical sense of the word.

Before birth, babies don't respirate through their lungs, they simply take fluid into their lungs and expel the same as a normal autonomic action, since this is one of the things lungs do. Once the source for oxygen is removed at birth, the lungs begin to respirate.

As we read, we need to note certain cues, such as quotation marks, to ferret out any non-literal language.


[edit on 18-7-2009 by Praetorian Guard]



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by PokeyJoe

Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
reply to post by Solomons
 


Divers may not have it, but come on....you know the military has it.

I mean all they would have to do is study how gills retain oxygen, and I'm sure that has been done.

Good point though all together....

Peace


Yeahhhhhhh....simple! I don't know why we havent figured this out decades ago. /sarcasm


I didn't say it would be simple, that's all you. I said study how gills retain oxygen. I would imagine that it would require some sort of Nano tech in the liquid in order to filter the oxygen out of the liquid and give it to the lungs.

Sounds hard, not impossible.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 02:27 AM
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Originally posted by Solomons
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I was surprised to hear that when in the womb a fetus is covered in hair then it sheds it and eats it...strange.
Your right no doubt the military have it,but you would think there would be some commerical product by now..given our technology it doesn't seem like such a hard task.I should have searched, it seems an israeli scientist figured it out and it shows hope to be used by scuba divers! news.bbc.co.uk...



[edit on 18-7-2009 by Solomons]


Thanks for the link...

I agree with you. I didn't know about the hair thing...weird.

Peace



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by derpif
 


One of my neices picked up a sprite bottle that was sitting beside her front steps, her brother was mowing grass and didn't see her turn it up, she didn't tell anyone she drank anything bad tasting, but she had just drank the gasoline her brother used to prime his mower. The events of that night were horrific, as her condition worsened her mother, my sister, was asked to make a decision, she was told that her 5 yr old daughter was dying, and would most likely not make it through the next hour, but they had an experimental method they could try, they called it 'back to the womb', she would be placed into this machine and some type of liquid would fill the tube, and her lungs, ( I wish I could remember what the fluid was) and she would remain like this until they felt she could sustain life without it, she would remain alive as long as she was in the fluid, and could die upon removal. The procedure was called 'Ecmo'. It worked. She survived and is now 18 yrs old, she has some breathing problems, the gas caused holes in her lung tissues, but she is otherwise a happy healthy young lady.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by space cadet
reply to post by derpif
 


One of my neices picked up a sprite bottle that was sitting beside her front steps, her brother was mowing grass and didn't see her turn it up, she didn't tell anyone she drank anything bad tasting, but she had just drank the gasoline her brother used to prime his mower. The events of that night were horrific, as her condition worsened her mother, my sister, was asked to make a decision, she was told that her 5 yr old daughter was dying, and would most likely not make it through the next hour, but they had an experimental method they could try, they called it 'back to the womb', she would be placed into this machine and some type of liquid would fill the tube, and her lungs, ( I wish I could remember what the fluid was) and she would remain like this until they felt she could sustain life without it, she would remain alive as long as she was in the fluid, and could die upon removal. The procedure was called 'Ecmo'. It worked. She survived and is now 18 yrs old, she has some breathing problems, the gas caused holes in her lung tissues, but she is otherwise a happy healthy young lady.


Thank you Space Cadet...very cool.

From Wikipedia:

An ECMO machine is similar to a heart-lung machine. To initiate ECMO, cannulae are placed in large blood vessels to provide access to the patient's blood. Anticoagulant drugs (usually heparin) are given to prevent blood clotting. The ECMO machine continuously pumps blood from the patient through a "membrane oxygenator" that imitates the gas exchange process of the lungs, i.e. it removes carbon dioxide and adds oxygen. Oxygenated blood is then returned to the patient.

Management of the ECMO circuit is done by a team of ECMO specialists that includes ICU physicians, perfusionists, respiratory therapists and registered nurses that have received training in this specialty.




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