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What do YOU think aliens look like!

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posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 01:08 AM
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The ones who are benevolent, and their pets the reptiles. We are descendants to the benevolents and they mannage our spiritual organizatiom.




posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 01:51 AM
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J. B. S. Haldane said in Possible Worlds and Other Papers (1927) something to the effect that "The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine" and I would say that could apply to aliens too.

The fact that Hollywood and TV portray so many aliens as biped humanoids so they can fit an actor in the suit has us prejudiced to imagine something similar to ourselves, but I suspect the alien lifeforms are quite different. Carl Sagan did some nice creative work on this subject in clips like this:

Carl Sagan's Cosmos: Life on Jupiter



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 02:43 AM
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I think there's all different kinds - but some of them can appear whatever way they want to us.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 02:43 AM
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I think there's all different kinds - but some of them can appear whatever way they want to us.



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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Iam back heres some more food for thought:
As many of you have alredey said there are problebly others like us

Some might look like somthing out of a horror movie EX:
A zombie like being that has holes straight trough his body and no eyes,ears,limbs ect.
A vampiric being that feeds of the subtances [blood,bones,energy,ect.] of other beings
A mind controling parisite [i know many of you heard of the BodySnatchers but corect me if its something else]
Keep on posting


[edit on 19-7-2009 by Zeplin100]



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by Oouthere
 


Ill try to get it and i hope your book succeds



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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I think the aliens would be fish-like. Would an alien making the investment to travel all the way to another planet not choose a world like their own? I'm sure that ET would be able to tell that the earth is mostly covered with water and would reasonably conclude that the inhabitants were aquatic.



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by mithrawept
 


Ichthyic aliens... smells fishy...



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Thats strange you mention that smokey gas that appears outta the corner of your vision, I see that sometimes. I just thought it was water or something on my eye... It sounds like Jinn though

As for what I think they look like, well who knows... It depends on how you view the subject as a whole.

I believe that what people experience as "aliens" are not extraterrestrial. Takea dinosaur, evolve it 65000000 years, and you have a gray or reptilian alien.



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by Zeplin100
I think aliens would be completly difrent then life on earth they might have completly different senses such as they may have no hering but have the ability to create an aureo like wave to comunicate and dont have normal vision the possibilities are ENDLESS but i would to see and hear what you think


Why would they be different? What if they were our ancestors?




Thanks, Ron. I got a kick out of reading your note! YES..MIB's do exist. Did you get a chance to read my story about the 'visitor' I met at MacDill? He had 2 sets of eyelids...honestly...reptilian! I about s... my pants when I saw his eyes...never forget them!


MacDill is MacDill AFB... ET was wearing an officers uniform...


Well....You probably have a pretty good idea about me by now, and I said: "C'mon Captain, we all saw that thing last night, and it wasn't any kind of aircraft we've ever seen. What was it...and who's"? We all were looking directly at him, then curiously, like something’s not right with this guy, like he didn't seem to be alive. Kind of a waxy face, almost plastic or mannequin like and strange light green color eyes and wearing black gloves in 95 degree heat in a full dress uniform with no name tag. And not sweating!

He said: "I don't know what you're talking about, now get back to your units"! After what we saw the night before and the crap from the AP's, I was getting pissed. And when I saw he wasn't armed, when everybody we saw was, I wanted answers. I still had my M-16 in my hands. I made a kind of threatening move by wrapping my hand around the grip and trigger and said point blank: "Why are you wearing black leather gloves in this heat and not sweating"?

He didn't answer. I clicked off the safety. It seemed like if you were a mile away, you would have heard that click. He twitched at this and looked at the weapon then me. He knew I wasn't impressed with his rank. Nobody moved. Like time stopped. It was uncannily quiet. He was about five feet in front of me. And I thought: "If he makes a move towards me, I'm going to cut him in half".

He took two slow steps backwards and turned to head back to his jeep. First, he would have jumped down my throat for not saying "Sir" if he was a Captain. Then I would have been standing before a court martial for handling a weapon in a threatening manner. Third, he started back to his jeep (with no driver) and no response.

I was going to stop him but the MS was really freaked out by this time and ran up to me and said: "Are you crazy? What are you doing"?

I protested and said: "Sarge, this guy's an impostor, can't you see that? Everybody else might be dead"!

He said: "You may be right but I'll find out what's going on when we get back. Don't take the chance of a court martial for threatening an officer"!


I remember say something like: "I already did that and if he's an officer, then I'm an alien"! The "Captain" heard that and turned back and looked at me with black eyes! It sent a shivering chill up my spine upon seeing this and said: "Did you see that? Look at him! His eyes are black now"!

I started to raise my weapon at him and tell him to stop and the MS got in front of me and said: "Stand down soldier, that's an order"!

As the Captain drove off back towards the training area I told the MS: "We'll never know now, that's the last time we'll see him and you aren't going to find out anything when we get back and know it".

He said: "I know, but we saw something special and can't repeat it, can we? Who would believe us? And someone would stop us one way or another. And if I let you shoot him, and he is what he looks like, where would we be then? And what makes you think he didn't have a weapon? Because you couldn't see one? He may have had something that could vaporize all of us, the size of a lighter"!


Rest of report

So there you have what I think they look like... well at least the ONE species anyway



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by Zeplin100
They could look like large floating jellyfish,they could be a type of flameble gas,they could have no blood or skeleton



They could be Plasma Life Forms like the ones many call "UFO's on Earth


Here are your 'floaters'






and look like crystals [silicone],


Silicon crystals? Why do you guys always think silicon based life forms would look like crystals or rocks?
Where did you get such nonsense?

Are YOU made of rock or crystal? Or are you soft and pliable... You are based on Carbon... carbon crystals are diamond, a hardness of 10 on the scale the hardest substance we know, yet you are a "soft ugly bag of water"

Silicon crystal is Quarts, only has a harness of 7...

This is a silicon based life form ... well almost
it too is soft and warm and squishy... we have all used silicon rubber, silicone sealant... are those like rock?




Oh and forget it she's woth $6,000.00



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 06:14 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon
This is a silicon based life form ... well almost
it too is soft and warm and squishy... we have all used silicon rubber, silicone sealant... are those like rock?


Are you aware that "silicon based" has absolutely nothing to do with the composition of a living creature, and everything to do with the elements needed for the chemical reactions that make it a living creature?



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 06:49 AM
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IF there are other intelligent civilizations out there (as we may be the only one in our observable universe) I suppose some of those will look at least humanoid, given the fact that evolution didn't take another path on their planets at some point


They might as well look like us but just with minor differences such as skincolor, height and so forth, depending on their age and surrounding circumstances.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by JScytale
Are you aware that "silicon based" has absolutely nothing to do with the composition of a living creature, and everything to do with the elements needed for the chemical reactions that make it a living creature?


Dunno... you got a silicon based life form I can study?





posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Yay, a thread where I can post something fun! Sweet!

Ok, IMO before we start talking about what alien life looks like on another world why don't we talk about what life here looks alien (and have certain qualities that set them apart). There are creatures with adaptions that could have been massively expanded and evolved on another planet. Also it might get you thinking about possible other adaptions that a creature could earn on an alien planet.

Here's some cool stuff!


The Chinese giant salamander can grow up to 1.8m in length and evolved independently from all other amphibians over one hundred million years before Tyrannosaurus rex. (Credit: Image courtesy of Zoological Society of London)


Source




The Sagalla caecilian is found in just one location – the Sagalla Hill in the Taita Hills of south-east Kenya – in an area less than half the size of Manhattan Island. This species spends most of its life below ground, and is adapted for this burrowing lifestyle by having eyes protected by skin, a strong bony head for pushing through the soil, and sensory tentacles on either side of their head to detect the chemical signals of its prey. Having laid her eggs, the female Sagalla caecilian will guard these until they hatch, and may even feed the newly hatched young on her own skin like its close relative, the Taita African caecilian.


Source



The Greenland Shark


Gallant and his expedition partner, veterinarian Dr Chris Harvey-Clark, had both been intrigued for years by the occasional news reports of Canadian anglers landing an unexpectedly large catch while ice-fishing - a Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus). The Greenland shark belongs to the family of sleeper sharks, so named due to their sluggish behaviour, and is related to dogfish sharks. Preferring frigid waters from below freezing to about 12°C, the Greenland shark inhabits the depths of the Atlantic to at least 2,200m, and swims under the polar ice cap. Its slow swimming pace, the minimal resistance it puts up when captured, and inability to raise its body temperature above that of the icy waters suggests that it has a particularly low metabolic rate, and raises the question of how the species captures enough food to grow to lengths of up to 7.3m - larger than a great white shark. Part of the answer may be an extremely slow growth rate - about 0.5cm a year, according to one study - leading to estimates that a 7m specimen could be more than 200 years old, making Greenland sharks possibly the longest-lived vertebrates on the planet.



Greenland shark meat contains high levels of an ammonia-like compound, so is toxic if eaten fresh. The fermented flesh is considered a delicacy in Iceland. The chemical that renders the flesh toxic apparently functions as an antifreeze/preservative to protect the shark's body from freezing temperatures and crushing pressures (up to 9,700kg per sq cm) at the great depths they inhabit.




Source


The female mite known as Histiostoma murchiei creates her own husband from scratch. She lays eggs that turn into adults without needing to be fertilised. The mother then copulates with her sons within three of four days of laying the eggs, after which the sons die rather quickly.


Source




Octopuses are highly intelligent, likely more so than any other order of invertebrates. The exact extent of their intelligence and learning capability is much debated among biologists,[7][8][9][10] but maze and problem-solving experiments have shown that they do have both short- and long-term memory. Their short lifespans limit the amount they can ultimately learn. There has been much speculation to the effect that almost all octopus behaviors are independently learned rather than instinct-based, although this remains largely unproven. They learn almost no behaviors from their parents, with whom young octopuses have very little contact. An octopus opening a container with a screw cap An octopus has a highly complex nervous system, only part of which is localized in its brain. Two-thirds of an octopus's neurons are found in the nerve cords of its arms, which have a remarkable amount of autonomy. Octopus arms show a wide variety of complex reflex actions arising on at least three different levels of the nervous system. Some octopuses, such as the Mimic Octopus, will move their arms in ways that emulate the movements of other sea creatures.


Link to Octopus Video

Source

How about a predatory earthworm?


Land planarians devour earthworms, slugs, insect larvae, and are cannibalistic. Prey are located by chemoreceptors located in a single ciliated pit under the head or in a ciliated ventral groove. Struggling prey are held to the substrate and entangled in slimy secretions from the planarian. The pharynx is protruded from the mouth and into the prey. Food is reduced to small particles prior to entering the gastrovascular cavity. The food particles are taken by epithelial cells in amoeboid fashion and formed into food vacuoles. Planaria store food in digestive epithelium and can survive many weeks shrinking slowly in size without feeding. They are capable of utilizing their own tissues such as reproductive tissue for food when reserves are exhausted.


Source



Star Nosed Mole


It won’t win any beauty contests, but in terms of talent, the weird-looking star-nosed mole is the one to beat. The little mole, scientifically known as Condylura cristata, commonly lives in the wetlands and marshes of the eastern United States. As its name implies, it has a star for a nose — specifically, a snout made up of 22 fleshy tentacles, that form a fleshy, circular star. And with that star, says biologist Kenneth Catania of Vanderbilt University, the little mole can do some remarkable things. For example, Catania, who has been studying the unusual mole since his graduate student days at the University of California at San Diego, recently discovered that star-nosed moles have the odd habit of blowing bubbles underwater through their nostrils. It’s not mere play. Using a high-speed camera, Catania filmed the moles as they created the bubbles — at a rate of between 5 and 10 bubbles per second, or about the same speed at which other rodents sniff — and found that most of the bubbles are immediately sucked back into the nose. He also discovered that the moles aim their bubbles at specific targets; they’ll blow out a bubble to touch the surface of an object, such as a piece of an earthworm (a star-nosed mole delicacy) or a small fish. “When these bubbles come into contact with an object, it is almost inevitable that odorant molecules” — those that impart smell — “will mix with the air and be drawn into the nose when the bubble is inhaled,” Catania says. That means, he says, that the mole uses the bubbles to smell. The finding came as a big surprise to Catania and other scientists, because mammals weren’t thought to be able to smell underwater at all, much less smell by blowing bubbles.


Source

Here is an article about a scientific documentary dealing with possibilities of life on an alien planet. It's a good read, let me find the video itself so that I can actually contribute on topic.

Article

Here is the site!

National Geographic Link



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Dunno... you got a silicon based life form I can study?


what do you think "carbon based" refers to, genius? ___-based is a specific term.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by mithrawept
I think the aliens would be fish-like. Would an alien making the investment to travel all the way to another planet not choose a world like their own? I'm sure that ET would be able to tell that the earth is mostly covered with water and would reasonably conclude that the inhabitants were aquatic.


That is really brillant. Why ET's pick Earth? Well Earth is 2/3rd's H2O.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by JScytale
what do you think "carbon based" refers to, genius?


It means if I compress you enough under the right temperature even you would become a diamond


Silicon-'based' life forms on Earth



Diatoms in both fresh and salt water extract silica from the water to use as a component of their cell walls. Likewise, some holoplanktonic protozoa (Radiolaria), some sponges, and some plants (leaf phytoliths) use silicon as a structural material. Silicon is known to be required by chicks and rats for growth and skeletal development.




Silicon is in human connective tissues, bones, teeth, skin, eyes, glands and organs. It is a major constituent of collagen which helps keep our skin elastic, and it helps calcium in maintaining bone strength.



Well what do you know
SILICON makes our skin elastic and rubbery just like the pretty rubber dolly


Kinda proves my point that silicon in life forms does NOT mean ROCK CREATURES

Bio-genic Silica

[edit on 20-7-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


en.wikipedia.org...

Carbon forms the backbone of biology for all life on Earth. Complex molecules are made up of carbon bonded with other elements, especially oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen. It is these elements that living organisms need, among others, and carbon is able to bond with all of these because of its four valence electrons.


Characteristics of carbon as a basis for life

The two most important characteristics of carbon as a basis for the chemistry of life are that it has four valence bonds and that the energy required to make or break a bond is just at an appropriate level for building molecules which are not only stable but also reactive.

The fact that carbon atoms bond readily to other carbon atoms allows for the building of arbitrarily long and complex molecules.

There are not many other elements which appear to be even promising candidates for supporting life-like behavior, but the most frequent alternative suggested is silicon. This is in the same group in the Periodic Table of elements and therefore also has four valence bonds. It also bonds to itself, but generally in the form of crystal lattices, less amenable to a complete source of life, rather than long chains. However, its compounds are generally highly stable and do not support the ability to readily re-combine in different permutations in a manner that would plausibly support life-like processes.

This speculation of a life based on the chemistry of silicon is clearly distinct from "silicon-based life" in the above sense of artificial intelligence based on electronic processes utilizing silicon integrated circuits.



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by JScytale



There are not many other elements which appear to be even promising candidates for supporting life-like behavior, but the most frequent alternative suggested is silicon. This is in the same group in the Periodic Table of elements and therefore also has four valence bonds.


Now your catching on



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