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Ship board laser version being ready within 2 years.

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posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 03:51 PM
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www.military.com...


A U.S. Navy plan to test a high-power laser against the small-boat threat to its warships provides the first real opportunity to transition electric lasers from the laboratory to the field, says Northrop Grumman, which has won a $98-million contract for the Maritime Laser Demonstration (MLD).

Within 12-18 months, a prototype laser weapon system is to be installed on a ship and tested against a remotely controlled small boat in a representative at-sea environment. The system will use technology from the Defense Dept.'s Joint High Power Solid-State Laser (JHPSSL) program, under which Northrop Grumman in March achieved an output of 105 kw. by optically combining the beams from a chain of laser modules.

"This is an opportunity to transition solid-state laser technology to the warfighter," says Dan Wildt, vice president of directed-energy systems for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector. "We've been trying to make the transition for a long time, and we see the Navy being very serious about understanding this capability."

Since the 2000 attack on the USS Cole in the Yemeni harbor of Aden, the Navy has been looking for an answer to the small-boat threat. The potential threat ranges from tens of jet skis carrying individuals armed with rocket-propelled grenades to handfuls of fast-attack craft carrying short-range cruise missiles. The challenge includes discriminating, identifying and prioritizing the most threatening targets in a littoral environment crowded with waterborne traffic.

A high-energy laser is a promising solution, says Wildt, because it allows a graduated response to the threat. The weapon's powerful optics can be used to identify a threatening craft, which can then be illuminated with a low-power green laser to send a visual warning to stay away from the warship. If the boat continues to show intent, he says, the high-power laser can be used to attack the motor or hull to disable the craft.


Lasers replacing missiles? Naw...still need to hit bunkers and so on with cruise missiles and lasers ain't like star trek phasers that do massive damage. Who knows perhaps in a few decades. But right now lasers can't be bent to hit targets over the horizon unless we use mirrors.




posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by deltaboy
www.military.com...

Lasers replacing missiles? Naw...still need to hit bunkers and so on with cruise missiles and lasers ain't like star trek phasers that do massive damage. Who knows perhaps in a few decades. But right now lasers can't be bent to hit targets over the horizon unless we use mirrors.


they can bounce lasers off of satellites though.


or just put the lasers on the satellites in the first place



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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Identical post.

Click Here

FYI



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Wildbob77
 


Should put in the weaponry section instead of breaking news. Thats why I put mine in weaponry since its about a weapon system.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by deltaboy
 


An aegis class crusier has already been modified to take the laser package.


And there is no need to hit targets over the horizon with the laser, its a ciws. Its meant for use against small boats and aircraft.
Although, honestly a rapid fire cannon like a bushmaster chaingun, or a mauser revolver cannon would be more effective against a small suicide type boat. Phalanx and goalkeeper are over kill against such a target
The scalable northrup system has already proven effective against small aircraft and vehicles.
And the modular solid state laser system is scaleable, need more power, just add more projectors.

Its is really an interim weapon system, to be used until they get the FEL's(Free electron Laser), operational.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks
reply to post by deltaboy
 




Although, honestly a rapid fire cannon like a bushmaster chaingun, or a mauser revolver cannon would be more effective against a small suicide type boat. Phalanx and goalkeeper are over kill against such a target.


With goalkeeper and phalanx in automatic mode radar clutter would tend to mask the target. and you would have the danger of the projectiles skipping off and hitting things down range.
like other ships in formation while under way or causing damage to non targets on shore when in port.

With a laser you would not have this problem.
plus at low power the same lasers could be used to light up aircraft for laser guided weapons IE AA missiles



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 10:08 PM
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reply to post by ANNED
 


Optical and infrared targeting would eliminate the clutter problem.As do the dual band radars of the goalkeeper
The multiple targeting systems of the russian systems is probably the best feature they have, the ability to target with optical and infrared.



My feeling about the reasoning for using a laser in the stated purpose, is really more of a PC touchy feely atttitude of "lets not upset the locals"

In a conflict situation any navy needs to send a STRONG message that, there will severe consequenses for approaching to close to a warship.

Knocking out the motor doesnt send that message
The only reason they attacked the cole in the way they did was because the could, If they knew they would be shreaded once they got to close, they likley wouldnt have tried.
Also how prudent is it to put into a hostile port in the first place.



posted on Aug, 8 2009 @ 07:16 PM
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Haven't heard of HAARP in askaska yet huh? they use the atomosphere as a mirror for energy directing and communication. check out (coasttocoastam.com) archives and podcasts



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