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The Differences Between Satellites and Non-Satellites.

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posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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Hello all, I created this thread to ask for help which might in turn help other members.

I sometimes see satellites crossing the sky and I've read snippets about their movng habits here on A.T.S over time. I've seen members say that satellites do not stop and start in the sky, that they just keep moving constantly. I'd like to know....definitively....if this is true.

My reason for asking is because last year I was watching the sky at night for u.f.o activity, for the record I don't believe aliens have as yet visited earth but do believe we are not alone in the universe so it could happen, it's just that as yet there's nothing conclusive to make me believe it has. Anyway, as I was saying, I was scanning the sky and this 'star' suddenly grew brighter for a second and made off slowly across the sky where it stopped again and just stayed there. So, I thought that it must be a satellite that either used some kind of booster to move or there was a reflection off the satellites solar panel, both of which would explain the momentary brightness of the object.

Do satellites behave in this manner? Do they have boosters? Do they have reflective panelling (i.e solar panels) that could create a reflection from the Sun that we could see from earth? Do they stop and start?

Thanks for any replies.




posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by Hawkwind.
 


Satellites move at a constant speed, in a specific orbit. Although they may have some, small boosters to adjust their speed and orbit, these would be rarely used, if ever.

en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 16-7-2009 by suomichris]



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 01:44 PM
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Satellites by definition, are things that rotate around an object by gravitational force, at a constant speed.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Hawkwind.
 


While some people gave you good answers, there are Satellites that are stationary, meaning they hand over one geographical location all day and night; Weather, communication, and even Spy satellites. This good have been one of those.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by poedxsoldiervet
 

Geostationary satellites orbit only over the equator, at an altitude of 22,236 miles. They are not visible to the naked eye.


[edit on 7/16/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by poedxsoldiervet
reply to post by Hawkwind.
 


While some people gave you good answers, there are Satellites that are stationary, meaning they hand over one geographical location all day and night; Weather, communication, and even Spy satellites. This good have been one of those.


Yeah but from your point of view here on earth a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit would appear not to move at all. This type of satellite would never behave like you are proposing as a solution.

Edit: and what Phage said.

[edit on 16-7-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 


One of those Geo-orbit satelites could have been readjusting its altitude due to Earth pulling on its orbit.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by poedxsoldiervet
reply to post by DaMod
 


One of those Geo-orbit satelites could have been readjusting its altitude due to Earth pulling on its orbit.


lol! Wow that's just about the funniest thing I've heard all day.

Please define geosynchronous orbit.

[edit on 16-7-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by Hawkwind.
I was scanning the sky and this 'star' suddenly grew brighter for a second and made off slowly across the sky where it stopped again and just stayed there.

Hawkwind, what you describe sounds very much like Autokinesis

Autokinesis is a visual illusion. It can occur under certain conditions, especially on dark nights in areas with few visual cues (such as lights or other illuminated objects or landmarks). When a small, dim, and fixed light source remains within visual range for an extended period of time, this phenomenon can occur, making it appear as if the light source were moving. This visual illusion can be of particular danger to pilots at night. In addition, it is possible that this illusion may account for some supposed UFO sightings in which witnesses may see an isolated light, such as a bright star or planet, seeming to move erratically around.


My guess is there's a good chance that is what you saw. It doesn't mean anything is wrong with your vision, it can happen to any of us. One way to check it if it ever happens again, is mount a camcorder on a tripod, and see if the light is moving inside the viewfinder (or on the LCD), and maybe even record it, that's one way to be sure if it's really moving or not.

[edit on 16-7-2009 by Arbitrageur]



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Thanks for the alternative explanation, Arbitrageur. The problem there is that my 11 year old Son was stargazing with me and he saw the exact same thing. Even if I was on my own there was dozens of other stars as a reference point that it moved against so it was no illusion. We were down in Cornwall, England at the time, on holiday, the sky was crystal clear and the stars were vivid as they often are down in Cornwall.

I appreciate the replies, people.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by Hawkwind.
 
Good, well that additional information rules out autokinesis.

The only time I've observed a light move like that and then stop, is when I was near an airport, I saw a light move just like you described, and then it stopped, and it didn't move at all for a very long time. Then the light started getting brighter, and I finally realized it was an airplane on approach.

Because the approach path kept the plane descending at the constant rate as it approached the runway, it produces a visual effect of being completely motionless for quite a long time. And right before it enters the approach path you can see some movement.

But if it wasn't that either I have no idea what it could have been. I guess it's a mystery, it sure doesn't sound like anything a satellite would do except possibly in the initial launch.deployment phase, and as Phage said it's probably not that either since the geosynchronous satellites wouldn't be visible.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by The Killah29
Satellites by definition, are things that rotate around an object by gravitational force, at a constant speed.


Not by any scientific definition, please hit 'reset' and try again.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 04:03 PM
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I live in Cornwall and see these things all the time.

Amazing sights



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by imsteve
I live in Cornwall and see these things all the time.

Amazing sights



Hello Steve, have you seen the exact thing I described? Something that looks exactly like a star which suddenly shines about 4 times brighter for 1-2 seconds then moves slowly across the sky?



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by Hawkwind.
 


That description (without the stopping you describe in the OP) is exactly what is seen with an Iridium flare.
www.satobs.org...

Are you familiar with heavens-above? With it, you can find out when an Iridium flare (as well as other satellite passes) will be occurring at your location.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 09:41 PM
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Do all satillites travel in the same direction?

I spend alot of time outside at night looking at the sky and see alot of satillites, however once in a while I see what looks like a typical satillite but it travels in the opposite direction than the rest.



posted on Jul, 17 2009 @ 12:30 PM
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Most satellites travel West to East or roughly toward the poles. I must emphasize "most". There are some satellites that do not follow this guideline. Very few satellites travel East to West.

Also any satellite performing a correction maneuver will be expending so little energy that a change in direction would not be visible to the naked eye, period.
If you see a light breaking this rule pay very special attention to it.

It is very common to see a satellite flare up. These are reflections of sunlight off of shiny surfaces on the satellite.



posted on Jul, 17 2009 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Phage[
That description (without the stopping you describe in the OP) is exactly what is seen with an Iridium flare.
www.satobs.org...




It's easily possible that instead of stopping it might have got to such a point that the angle of reflection moved out of my view, so to me it would have looked like it had stopped (there were lots of stars) but really it just carried on, that could also go for it 'popping' into view when I first saw it. I think it all fits in with it being an Iridium flare, thanks.



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