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The Next Foodborne Threat? MRSA infections from contaminated meat

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posted on Jul, 15 2009 @ 11:48 PM
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Posted on July 15, 2009 by Denis Stearns
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In an interesting article published online today, the author discusses the growing threat to the public health posed by the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in our food supply. See Stephanie Woodard, Concerns Over Superbugs in our Food Supply, available at www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31766160/ns/health-food_safety/ Although this threat is not new, nor are the warnings be raised about it, I thought it was worth raising the issue here in light of the article posted yesterday about Legislative efforts to restrict the widespread use of antibiotics in food animals. (To read that article, see here: www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2009/07/articles/food-poisoning-watch/antibiotic-use-in-food-animals-addressed-by-house-committee/#comments ) I think that one passage in particular is worth paying attention to, because it shows just how far we need to go to both understand this growing risk, but to stop it.

Until recently, the CDC has acknowledged the presence of MRSA in meat but downplayed the danger. In 2008, then CDC director Julie Louise Gerberding, MD, MPH, wrote that foodborne transmission of MRSA is "possible" but, if it happens, "likely accounts for a very small proportion of human infections in the US." Liz Wagstrom, DVM, assistant vice president of science and technology for the National Pork Board, agrees, saying that this kind of transmission would be extremely rare. Neither group could provide an estimate when queried by Prevention, but considering the high numbers of MRSA infections, even a tiny percentage could be a lot of people.

One reason the CDC and the National Pork Board must guess about transmission rates — and why we don't know exactly how many MRSA-related infections occur — is that the federal government doesn't collect data on MRSA outbreaks, says Karen Steuer, director of government operations for the Pew Environment Group. According to the US Government Accountability Office, there's no testing for MRSA on farms. And the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System tests just 400 retail cuts of meat each month for four drug-resistant bacteria — which don't include MRSA.

To read more, please click on the Continue Reading link.

Research done in the European Union is increasingly confirming the presence of MRSA in meat products. For example, in a study published in the CDC-journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases, researchers found 36 different strains of S. Aureus in 79 samples of meat, including two that were methicillin-resistant. See van Loo, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in meat products, the Netherlands. Emerg Infect Dis [serial on the Internet]. 2007 Nov [Available from www.cdc.gov/EID/content/13/11/1753.htm Recently-published research has confirmed the same thing among pigs and pig farmers in the United States, finding MRSA present in nearly half of the pigs and pig farmers tested. See Smith TC, Male MJ, Harper AL, Kroeger JS, Tinkler GP, et al. (2009) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strain ST398 Is Present in Midwestern U.S. Swine and Swine Workers. PLoS ONE 4(1): e4258. Available from www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0004258

Dr. Tara Smith, the scientist that did the study that found MRSA so widely present in Iowa is on record as saying the federal government has a huge role to play in addressing this problem. "The studies should be expanded nationwide to examine hundreds of farms in Iowa and other swine-farming states and see how common MRSA is on a national level." Dr. Smith also states that here study is a real reminder of need for safe food handing and cooking procedures. As quoted, she states: "It's likely that cooking will kill any MRSA present on the surface of meats, but anyone handling raw meats should be careful about cross-contamination of cooking areas or other food products, and should make sure hands are washed before touching one's face, nose, lips, etc."

www.foodpoisonjournal.com...


today.msnbc.msn.com...

That's just great!


Maybe it's time to stop eating meat. Although I already have MRSA. Just got another outbreak of it, cant kill the damn virus. I don't know whats worse the virus or the antibotics to try and kill it. The newest drug they have me on is called Avelox and one of the side effects could be that it ruptures my achilles tendon. UNBELIEVABLE!

[edit on 15-7-2009 by Kingfanpaul]

[edit on 16-7-2009 by Kingfanpaul]




posted on Jul, 15 2009 @ 11:58 PM
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Try oregano oil.


"We have done a few preliminary tests and have found that the essential oil from the oregano kills MRSA at a dilution 1 to 1,000." "The tests show that the oil kills MRSA both as a liquid and as a vapour and its antimicrobial activity is not diminished by heating in boiling water," she added.


www.medicalnewstoday.com...

Other essential oils seem to work well too and they won't rupture your achilles tendon



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 12:01 AM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
Try oregano oil.


"We have done a few preliminary tests and have found that the essential oil from the oregano kills MRSA at a dilution 1 to 1,000." "The tests show that the oil kills MRSA both as a liquid and as a vapour and its antimicrobial activity is not diminished by heating in boiling water," she added.


www.medicalnewstoday.com...

Other essential oils seem to work well too and they won't rupture your achilles tendon


Hey thanks, I will defintely have to try that.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by Kingfanpaul
 


Yes, I got it like 5 years ago from having 23 major surgeries at our Trauma 1 hospital here. I have had IV anti-biotics, one Vancomycin which apparently does kidney damage. I had a metal rod put in my tibia and that seems to be the source of the reinfections, but the doctors don't seem to feel that way. I am at my wits end to find some doctor that can actually find a course of therapy to wipe it out completely.

A nurse I met told me that anyone that has worked in a major hospital for more than 3 or 4 years is colonized with it. She seemed fine to me. I think it is being under reported as well. It has been in our local county newspaper that it is breaking out all over the county. So that was indicating there is an environmental source somewhere that they did not identify. Now last week the paper said it is in the Atlantic ocean and swimming at any S.E. US beach could expose you to MRSA.

And I read somewhere that this MRSA can withstand boiling water for 20 minutes and survive. If that is the case, I don't know how you could get rid of it everywhere in your environment and it being a recolonization threat.

Good Luck in Your Battle with this nightmare MRSA.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by spirit_horse
 
I have worked in hospitals for 39 years. I am most likely colonized with MRSA, but that dosen't mean that I will be ill. If I have surgery, I might have a problem with infection. The problem is prevalent in nursing homes. Almost every nursing home patient I get, if they have bedsores, has MRSA. I know because we culture the bedsores in order to know what antibiotic we have to use. Vancomycin is hard on the kidneys. Usually, the doctor will write an order for the pharmacist to adjust the dosage from day to day, based on BUN and creatnine studies, which are drawn daily. You don't give your symptoms, so I can't speak to where the infection is located. And I'm not sure you will ever be free of MRSA. It has gotten into the general population.



posted on Jul, 16 2009 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by Kingfanpaul
 


You're quite welcome.


Put some directly on the boil. Be careful, this stuff is incredibly strong. Either dilute the pure form, or get the kind with olive oil in it. Wrap it up, reapply daily or more often.

Also take it internally, 2-5 drops of the pure form, or 10-25 with the olive oil daily. Take a break on internal consumption every 3rd or 4th day to take high-potency probiotics.

Oregano oil will wipe out the GI tract pretty well like antibiotics, so you need to repopulate it with acidophilus & bifidobacterium at least.

I think since you were able to contract it and become infected it shows your immune-system is already compromised to some extent, so after you are able to fight it off, it would be a good idea to continue working on your GI tract.

Also, some immune boosters would be a good idea. High-dose ascorbic acid, natural vitamin-e, zinc citrate/picolinate, selenium, and green tea would be wise to incorporate into the daily regiment.

Good luck



[edit on 16-7-2009 by unityemissions]



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
reply to post by Kingfanpaul
 


You're quite welcome.


Put some directly on the boil. Be careful, this stuff is incredibly strong. Either dilute the pure form, or get the kind with olive oil in it. Wrap it up, reapply daily or more often.

Also take it internally, 2-5 drops of the pure form, or 10-25 with the olive oil daily. Take a break on internal consumption every 3rd or 4th day to take high-potency probiotics.

Oregano oil will wipe out the GI tract pretty well like antibiotics, so you need to repopulate it with acidophilus & bifidobacterium at least.

I think since you were able to contract it and become infected it shows your immune-system is already compromised to some extent, so after you are able to fight it off, it would be a good idea to continue working on your GI tract.

Also, some immune boosters would be a good idea. High-dose ascorbic acid, natural vitamin-e, zinc citrate/picolinate, selenium, and green tea would be wise to incorporate into the daily regiment.

Good luck



[edit on 16-7-2009 by unityemissions]


I just wanted to thank you again because I went out and got the oil of oregano but in pill form. Took a pill and then broke one and mixed it with oil and rubbed it on my nose and cleaned it up hours later and re-applied again that day and when I woke up the next day there was already a dramtic differance. Now as of today it's almost healed but I am stuck in bed due to hurt legs from that crappy prescruption drug.

Thanks again!



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by Kingfanpaul
 


Great news!!


Very glad this worked out for you. Wanted to bump this so hopefully more people can see how effective this essential oil is. This treats not only MSRA, but candida, and a wide range of viral and bacterial infections.

It's excellent as the first step in a one-two punch to heal the G.I. tract.

First, take oregano oil, & enteric coated peppermint oil for several days to wipe out the tract of pathogenic overgrowths.

Second switch to probiotics, and glutamine powder for a few days to restore internal balance.

Repeat as many times as necessary.

I prefer kefir and kombucha for probiotic sources...

KefirLady

Many, many uses.

Spread the info...


[edit on 20-7-2009 by unityemissions]



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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NO!

MRSA can't be digested. Its an opportunistic pathogen that must wait for its host to be compromised to start a serious infection. I'm not saying you can eat a film of MRSA and not get sick, but it can be treated.

MRSA is only a worry for those stuck in hospitals, for long periods of time, where bed sores might become an issue. Other than that, through many different decontamination techniques, hospitals are pretty friggen clean right now.

I think there were only 12 cases of MRSA at the closest hospital all of last year combined.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by retroviralsounds
 


I've known of people getting MRSA outside of hospitals.

It does happen, though not nearly as often.



posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 06:55 PM
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Ok, i should say either:
A) in a hospital
B) Play for the Cleveland Browns.

MRSA infections aren't uncommon outside the hospital, but they almost always stem from a cut, abrasion or otherwise the bacteria has gotten into.


CX

posted on Jul, 21 2009 @ 06:58 PM
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Manuka honey is supposed to be good against MRSA too.

I started on the stuff a while back, tastes nice and has many good uses apparently.

CX.



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