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Has Anyone Ever heard of Squid Beachings?

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posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Amazing. Can you imagine having a face like that?




posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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Questioningall has a thread on this too.....
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 10:06 PM
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Haha tasty... yes but the texture is bizarre
I had octopus the first time in Japan. Cant say I was impressed... just reallllly chewy thats all to eexpect. Maybe cooked would be better, I do like calamari.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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Ha Ha Ha! That reminds me of the time my daughter went with me to the store and they had this stuff at the meat/fish counter: combo of clam, shrimp, fish, and baby octopus. She loves that stuff so she asked me to get some for her to make with pasta. So I asked the guy behind the counter for 1/2 a pound of bait. she got mad at me but really liked her dinner.



posted on Jul, 18 2009 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by missvicky
 

I've used calamari for bait since I was a kid and have never quite gotten over the stigma. I'll eat it, and it can taste pretty good, but it will always smell like bait to me.

Octopus on the other hand, is delicious (cooked or raw).



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 12:32 AM
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I gotta admit I'm just not one for eating squid or octopus or even clams.
Calamari always has the texture of tire tread, clams the texture of a mouthful of rubberbands, and octopus, well.....just can't even begin to go there. Now clams don't bother me, squid are even wierder than octopi, but octopi.....well, to me it would be like eating a person. I know that sounds crazy but to me they look like they are about 85% brain. That's supposed to mean reaally intelligent. And we aren't even 85% brain.
I think I've had a bit too much of the ol' Merlot....good night all!



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by missvicky
 

Intelligent compared to other invertebrates maybe (but they do that cool trick of opening a jar).
But they don't live too long anyway. Most (the edible ones) last only a year or so.



[edit on 7/19/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 12:50 AM
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Ok Phage. Now I am going to spend the rest of the night surfing youtube for squid and octopus videos. Happy now?

Seriously, though, isn't that problem solving and tool using? That's how humans rate intelligence. That's really smart for an animal without any bones. Not that bones have anything to do with intelligence but as far as I know you have to go all the "down" to amoebas to get animals without bones. And as far as i know amoebas are kinda stupid?



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by missvicky
 

Opening shells is part of their "normal" behavior. It could be that opening a jar is similar enough to be considered an extension of an instinct. But then...

We propose that Octopus vulgaris is capable of learning the solutions of both problems, Operandum and Predation, thus showing a highly developed ability of "integration" of the behavioral program.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:01 AM
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They would pry shells apart, not unscrew them. I would think that for an octopus to open a jar lid would indicate thinking and problem solving. And a jar is foreign to their natural environment. I wonder what would happen if we could find a way to communicate with them like scientists have with chimps, gorilla, and parrots. Too bad they don't have any bones.



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by missvicky
 

Spineless buggers!
Let's eat 'em!




posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:04 AM
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posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:26 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...#

Ok not proving my skills as a brilliant researcher, but check out the two videos on octopi. Leaves me speechless.



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by missvicky
 


They seem to be clever. But not clever enough.
My cousin had a salt water aquarium in which he had an octopus (which ate most of the fish in the tank). One night the critter pushed the cover glass off the tank and made his escape. Unfortunately, he didn't make it too far.

It was really kind of sad. Could it have been suicide or just a terrible mistake?



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:33 AM
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Bony buggers! Let's eat 'em!
www.youtube.com...



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by missvicky
 

Oh, you're good!




posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 05:05 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


xoxoxxo



posted on Jul, 19 2009 @ 09:01 PM
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Haha! I dont see what all the fuss is over reptilian aliens. Now an octopus that was humanoid - THAT would be something to worry about!

Camouflage, 8 arms, intelligence, ink jet that would ruin your clothes. Versus, reptile that would die off in the winter. We need the Octopian threads instead of reptilian



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by Ridhya
 


Oh yeah! I rather like "Octopian", has a nice ring to it!



posted on Jul, 20 2009 @ 06:47 AM
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Found some more information about this.


Thousands of jumbo flying squid – aggressive 5-foot-long sea monsters with razor-sharp beaks and toothy tentacles – have invaded the shallow waters off San Diego, spooking scuba divers and washing up dead on tourist-packed beaches. The carnivorous calamari, which can grow up to 100 pounds, came up from the depths last week and swarms of them roughed up unsuspecting divers. Some divers report tentacles enveloping their masks and yanking at their cameras and gear. Stories of too-close encounters with the alien-like cephalopods have chased many veteran divers out of the water and created a whirlwind of excitement among the rest, who are torn between their personal safety and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to swim with the deep-sea giants. The so-called Humboldt squid, which can grow up to 100 pounds, are native to the deep waters off Mexico, where they have been known to attack humans and are nicknamed "red devils" for their rust-red coloring and mean streak. Those who dive with them there chum the water with bait and sometimes get in a metal cage or wear chain mail to avoid being lashed by tentacles. "I wouldn't go into the water with them for the same reason I wouldn't walk into a pride of lions on the Serengeti," said Mike Bear, a local diver. "For all I know, I'm missing the experience of a lifetime." The squid are too deep to bother swimmers and surfers, but many longtime divers say they are staying out of the surf until the sea creatures clear out. Yet other divers, including Shandra Magill, couldn't resist the chance to see the squid up close. On a recent night, Magill watched in awe as a dozen squid with doleful, expressive eyes circled her group, tapping and patting the divers and gently bumping them before dashing away.

hisz.rsoe.hu...



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