Alien weapons

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posted on May, 13 2004 @ 09:16 AM
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I had no idea russians were involved. I thought that americans did it themselves. Where did you find that? Who was this mathematician?
Also, wouldn't russians have lots of stealth planes if it were invented there?




posted on May, 13 2004 @ 01:36 PM
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I want the Alien weapons on Halo! Mmm, Plasma rifle looks yummy. Also those RPG-like cannons from the Hunters.



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 07:58 PM
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those are sweet!
Maybe I could make one! anyone got any ideas?



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 08:05 PM
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hehe, ya prolly need Plasma and like super-duper batteries



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 08:13 PM
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1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 9 volts
no , to ionize the air for plasma, you really don't need that much. you could probably use magnetic fields to compress and propel plasma. I think that 2 9-volts would do



posted on May, 14 2004 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by DanD9
1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 9 volts
no , to ionize the air for plasma, you really don't need that much. you could probably use magnetic fields to compress and propel plasma. I think that 2 9-volts would do


dunno why but that sounded very interesting and I'm curious now, hehe - but I'm a li'l confused - care ta explain a bit simplier, or know of any good links.



posted on May, 14 2004 @ 07:54 PM
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[- England had nothing to do with it.
how many times dont call us england !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
also i didnt hear of britain doing it ethier the germans just exsperimented with radar didnt they?



posted on May, 15 2004 @ 10:35 PM
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u could use a capacitor to store elct. charge, then release it into the air, and a wire coil around the said air The discharge thru air would make the plasma, the magn. field would compress and push away the plasma, like squeezing a ketchup packet. I should do that



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 06:30 PM
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Wow! becareful guys~ Capacitors may store a lethal dose of electrons even on a 9 volt battary. Make sure you know what your doing before jumping into this project of build a plasma/mag field toy.



posted on May, 19 2004 @ 08:20 PM
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Oh, yes, I know to watch my fingers (and arms, legs, and nose). Larger capacitors can remove your arm or leg! Does anyone know any other precautions beside not to touch the device when charged?


XL5

posted on May, 19 2004 @ 08:42 PM
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Thick rubber lines man gloves, hearing protection and some sort of UV blocker (welding mask). Also, don't do it around ppl with pacemakers.



posted on May, 19 2004 @ 09:22 PM
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Cool. Got most of those things. I hardly know anyone with a pacemaker. Now just gotta get a russian surplus pulse discharge capacitor and a transformer! Someone please tell me if I left something out of my idea.



posted on May, 19 2004 @ 10:43 PM
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Just a note:

Rubber gloves may or may not be enough to handle a discharge from a capacitor. Remember that the discharge is stored and then released in a one way Direct Current (although short lived at the capacitor output) + a Sine Wave (AC) fashion. The voltage upon the initial release of the current is many times greater than the input voltage (capacitance discharge). This is why capacitors can kill or blow a leg off.

The discharge is based on the size of the capacitor, the input voltage, the impedance of the load (DC Resistance + AC Reactance), and the capacitance.

If the capacitor is big enough, the loads DC resistance low enough, and if the capacitance is large enough (large plate size and minimum spacing), a 12 volt input can create an output voltage of several hundred if not thousands of volts initially and a high enough current, due to the low DC resistance of the load that could easily kill you even though you are wearing rubber gloves.

Remember that rubber will not hold up to a high voltage/high frequency AC discharge or a high voltage DC discharge. The high voltage will go right through the rubber gloves. The capacitor initially releases 63.7% of it stored energy on first contact with the load during one 360 degree sine wave and then each sine wave (each Hertz) after that has 63.7 % of the remaining stored charge. This goes on til the stored charge no longer disipates (5 or 6 Hertz). Even though a capacitor does not pass DC voltage only AC voltage 'thru' the capacitor plates, it still creates a very strong initial DC current (63.7% of the stored energy) on an AC carrier voltage. This is why rubber is not used in high voltage power lines and on transformers. Porclan or glass is a much better insulater at higher frequencies and/or voltage than rubber. Rubber holds up to about 500 volts DC, or AC at a frequency of 50 or 60 Hertz. Because the frequency is directly proportional to the voltage, rasing one or the other lowers the properties of rubber as an insulator. It starts to become a conductor as the voltage or frequency increses.


XL5

posted on May, 20 2004 @ 04:02 AM
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Lineman gloves can hold off 100KVDC if they are thick enough and I'd bet they have all sorts of polymers in them. HV transmission lines can be 115KVAC in most areas and the gloves will protect at that voltage since they are thick.

Also, DC voltages in capacitors will not increase in voltage unless some of the energy is put into an inductive load (coil/inductor). The Henry value and the capacitors value will determine the voltage increase, the higher Henry values will give you more voltage. The quicker the pulse into the coil, the more voltage you get (you get less amps though). 12VDC into any capacitor is not going to get you a powerful and quick pulse needed for anything cool.

Free camera flash units are fun, but nothing like surplus pulse discharge capacitors. List of what I have so far: 4 - 4KVDC 100uF oil filled caps and 3 - 3.5KVDC 95uF caps with 1" dia. terminals and about 200 camera flash caps 330VDC 120-200uF.

How ever, having your hand near a powerful shockwave of molten metal and other things that may become tiny bullets is a bad idea. Having lots of 12KV microwave oven diodes is nice for HV power supplies.



posted on May, 20 2004 @ 09:38 AM
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I was stressing the rubber glove issue because some folks out there think rubber gloves are all the same. As you pointed out linemans gloves are different. Pure rubber will not hold it's own under high voltage. I just dont want someone to get bit. I've been bit before when I was a kid by a capacitor on an old AC compressor. That hurt. As for my post last night I'm a little rusty on the exact theroy hehind it. I haven't fooled with electricity since about 79 but you get my point.



posted on May, 21 2004 @ 08:46 PM
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Ok thanks for the safety issues. I wanted to know that to avoid killing my self, painfully, too, im sure. I also need a bit of help with creating an electric pulse. I have some camera 330v capacitors. I need help making an electric pulse tough. If anyone could tell me how or post some circuits, it would be greatly appreciated.



posted on May, 21 2004 @ 08:50 PM
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It is rumoured that the British JSF will have the worlds first laser cannon/ particle beam weapon mounted on it instead of the usual 50 milly cannon.




posted on May, 22 2004 @ 08:23 AM
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One of those cannons would be sweet, although I doubt they have them already.
Well, does anyone have any schematics or something to hook up capacitors for a pulse of electricity?



posted on May, 22 2004 @ 09:06 AM
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From what I have read, there are a number of principles involved in stealth, beyond the pure math of the dissolution and refraction of waves.

The Nazis did build a couple of prototype 'flying wing' bombers in 44/45(?), and to save money, they types were made out of plywood. There was such a serious shortage of aircraft metal that actual wood was easier to fabricate. By this point the Nazi's HAD developed a primitive radar copied from the Brits. They were surprised that the ply structure had an extremely low signature.

Stealth, as far as I have read, didn't really crop up again until the Korean war, when automated radar-directed antiarcraft artillery became an issue.

Much of the work was down in England and at groom lake. The way it was done is to build a scale model of the craft, place it on a pole angled toward the radar source, and slowly rotate the model and check the signature. It turns out that the theoretical designs often have overtones that are difficult to predict.

Someone on another site wrote that you can identify a stealth lab from these signs:
1. A large square or circular runway, with asphalt only 2 or 3 inches deep, incapable of supporting a large plane
2. a 5-20 ft. padded pole, often sticking up through a trapdoor, at one side of the field. This would make it unsafe to land a plane or helicopter here.
3. a movable tent or dome, possibly on a track, to cover the pole, so that the model, when in place cannot be seen by satelites.

The sources I was reading said that much of the model work was done in the U.K., at their premier pilot training facility (can't remember location) where US pilots often are trained.

They also said that stealth is a craft rather than science; rt after the bomber went public, you notice that the air intakes for the engine had to be retooled, and the lower edge of the 'glass' on the pilots canopy, which was originally straight, now has a sawtooth edge. The computers said it wouldn't be a problem, and it wasn't in ground testing, but during flight the air rolling off of those surfaces changes the signature somehow.

I wish I could find the website again. Someone at ATS had linked it in a prior post. (not the Nazis, but the testing. I saw the Nazi stuff on the History Channel!)



posted on Jul, 30 2004 @ 08:25 AM
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people at amasci.com talk about plasma guns and stuff quite often as well as ball lightening

[edit on 31-7-2004 by greeon]






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