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Shuttle Launch NO-GO due to WEATHER - 24 Hour Delay

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posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by lagenese
 


weather stream

All that tech, and they can't blast through a few hundred feet of cumulus nimbus cloud


Nasa RSS feed: www.nasa.gov...



Forecasters at NASA's Spaceflight Meteorology Group say current conditions violate rules for launching Endeavour because of weather near the Shuttle Landing Facility. The runway would be needed in the unlikely event that Endeavour would have to make an emergency landing back at Kennedy. There is also a seabreeze coming off Florida's west coast that is making the weather more dynamic.


[edit on 12-7-2009 by PrisonerOfSociety]

[edit on 12-7-2009 by PrisonerOfSociety]




posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 05:53 PM
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I bet you lightning will hit it and it will explode in mid air.

But we will see in a few minutes.



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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Just annonced a "NO GO" for launch... Oh well



I wonder what will happen now...



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


You want to know something stupid.

I watch Formula One here in the Uk, when they have a race, they predict rain, sometimes to within minutes. That's for a bloody car race, you'd think NASA could sort their crap out and get some decent weather forcasting software!!!!



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 05:58 PM
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Useful experiments in space



During his (Koichi Wakata) time on the mission, he took part in experiments suggested by the public, including flying a 'magic carpet', folding laundry and push ups.

Wiki



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by PrisonerOfSociety
reply to post by lagenese
 


weather stream

All that tech, and they can't blast through a few hundred feet of cumulus nimbus cloud


The problem is more with the return-to-launch emergency landing site (landing back at KSC in the event of a launch abort). This is called a return To Launch Site (RTLS) Abort..and they could probably still do it in bad weather, but it is safer not to attempt it in bad weather.

The weather also needs to be good in the emergency landing site in Spain or Morocco for a Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL).

[edit on 7/12/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


I am in the UK also and unfortunately suffer the rigmarole of F1. They showed a radar today saying no rain in 30mins, then immediately reported spots of rain in the pit lane.

They go very high tech in F1; they put people miles around the circuit and phone back reports of first showers. So much for doppler radar.



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by lagenese
Just annonced a "NO GO" for launch... Oh well



I wonder what will happen now...


Actually at this time (7:00 PM EDT) they are still not officially scrubbed. Although they HAVE said that -- so far -- the weather is NO-GO...but they are waiting.

EDIT:
UPDATE -- it's 7:03 PM EST, and they HAVE now officially scrubbed it.

New launch time is tomorrow at 6:51 PM.



[edit on 7/12/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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The launch just got a 24 hour delay...how disappointing



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by anonymouse876
 


Yup, they just scrubbed the mission. They'll try again tomorrow...

Oh well



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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Yup it's official, a no-go and scheduled for tomorrow.



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


Sorry everyone. Hopefully all goes well tomorrow.

See you next time!



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


What is a 'return-to-launch emergency'?

Don't they need to separate from the SRB's before they can glide back and land on a normal airstrip? What is the minimum altitude as there's something called a dead man's curve for helicopter auto-rotation, beyond which there's not enough altitude to land safely.



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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That was actually more interesting than the lat two i watched that launched - so much tension - god speed for tomorrow STS-127



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


In a Return To Launch Site (RTLS) abort, the Shuttle continues downrange until the solid rocket boosters are jettisoned. It then pitches around, so the SSMEs are firing roughly against the line of travel. This maneuver occurs in a near vacuum above the appreciable atmosphere and is conceptually no different from the OMS engines firing against the line of travel to de-orbit. The main engines continue burning until downrange velocity is killed and the vehicle is .ed back toward the launch site at sufficient velocity to reach a runway. Then the SSMEs are stopped, the external tank is jettisoned, and the orbiter makes a normal gliding landing on the runway at Kennedy Space Center about 25 minutes after lift-off. The CAPCOM calls out the point in the ascent at which an RTLS becomes no longer possible as "negative return," approximately four minutes after lift-off.

Thank you wikipedia



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by Silk
reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


In a Return To Launch Site (RTLS) abort, the Shuttle continues downrange until the solid rocket boosters are jettisoned. It then pitches around, so the SSMEs are firing roughly against the line of travel. This maneuver occurs in a near vacuum above the appreciable atmosphere and is conceptually no different from the OMS engines firing against the line of travel to de-orbit. The main engines continue burning until downrange velocity is killed and the vehicle is .ed back toward the launch site at sufficient velocity to reach a runway. Then the SSMEs are stopped, the external tank is jettisoned, and the orbiter makes a normal gliding landing on the runway at Kennedy Space Center about 25 minutes after lift-off. The CAPCOM calls out the point in the ascent at which an RTLS becomes no longer possible as "negative return," approximately four minutes after lift-off.

Thank you wikipedia


Besides the RTLS (Return to Launch Site) abort and the TAL (Transoceanic Abort Landing) in Spain or Morocco, there are other abort protocols...

...Once they have gone far and high enough after launch that they can achiev an orbit -- any safe orbit -- then the TAL is no longer needed, and they can do an "Abort to Orbit" or ATO. In fact one shuttle mission back in 1985 needed to "Abort to Orbit", but even though the shuttle only attained a lower-than-planned orbit, the mission still went on.

Technically there is a few second-long window between the TAL and ATO for an "Abort Once Around" (AOA), which means the shuttle goes around the Earth once, but does not achieve orbit and lands at an emergency site (White Sands AFB, Edwards AFB, or bacK at Kennedy). But like I said, the window in which an AOA would be required is very, very small.

I don't know if the weather needs to be good at White Sands or Edwards to launch in case of a AOA -- but weather is usually good the those desert locations.

(I had to look these up, too
. I've heard of these, but didn't know the details.)



[edit on 7/12/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 12 2009 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


It was the RTLS that called no go from Houston tonight - that and the close to 10 mile call for Launch as well - NASA TV reported that they were about to call no go for launch just after Houston called no go for RTLS



[edit on 12-7-2009 by Silk]



posted on Jul, 13 2009 @ 12:14 PM
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T-minus 5h23mins

[edit on 13-7-2009 by PrisonerOfSociety]

[edit on 13-7-2009 by PrisonerOfSociety]



posted on Jul, 13 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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Yep back on track and all clear for now.

The coverage has begun on www.nasa.gov... again. Not much happening but its informative.

edit: 40% chance of favourable weather
60% chance of no go conditions.
fingers crossed.

[edit on 13-7-2009 by pazcat]



posted on Jul, 13 2009 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


I can't believe that they go through the whole procedure again, just for a %40 chance, I have new respect for the astronauts, having to sit still for three hours!



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