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Ban on Tobacco Urged in Military

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posted on Jul, 10 2009 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by jerico65
 


You just had to jump in and say that huh?

I'll bet you're one of those die hard anti- smoking people that will stand up in a crowd of people and scream at the one person that lights a cigarrette.

You people disgust me!




posted on Jul, 10 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by rgseymour
 


well, don't worry, Obama will be taxing each piece of food from fast food places and tax all junk food then he'll tax a ALL food, maybe that will effect the pure people that don't smoke and are not obese and are perfect specimens of the human race.

You won't be able to buy YOUR "healthy" food then , will you?



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 02:37 AM
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Our comander in chief smokes but we can't.

Is booze next?

How about the Burger Kings that are on base? Are they gone too?

If the government can tell the troops to stop, civilians will be next. What's them to stop telling you/us/them how to live their lives?

Whn to sleep?
When to eat?
What to do with our free time?

I mean, where do we draw the line? When is it ok to tell people what to do? When isn't it ok?

If you are receiving an unemployment check, can they tell you to stop smoking too?

-I'm going to be sick-



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 02:49 AM
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When you go into the military you become government property and you follow orders`.... You do not have the rights of a citizen or even the right to a trial by peers.....We cold smoke during the Vietnam era but the freedoms that otherwise exist in the military of today were unknown by us old guys, especially the big pay checks, off base living, and even being able to own a motorcycle and ride it on base if it was over 125cc.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:04 AM
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So you are willing to sign your life away for a paycheck and give up any real choice in what you do and where you go.

Then you are shocked they ban you from smoking? What did they expect? You give up your rights when you sign up. I don't think most kids who are joining (and I know quite a few) actually understand this point.

[edit on 11-7-2009 by drock905]



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:28 AM
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I support it. It's the military, I don't want my military coughing and hacking their way into battle. There's already enough crap killing good soldiers.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by drock905
 


You don't "Give up your rights" your swear to a Uniform Code and the Constitution, any Legal mandates by the military to it's soldiers must be complied with otherwise you're in dereliction of duty. I'm sure you know this, but I take exception to the notion that one loses his/her rights.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:33 AM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
I support it. It's the military, I don't want my military coughing and hacking their way into battle. There's already enough crap killing good soldiers.


Learn about "your" military before you start worrying about them hacking up a lung.

Since you are obviously referring to them smoking. I guess you don't mind if they chew tobacco. After all, they won't be hacking their way into battle.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:35 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


Actually it is very personal to me as I have a brother fighting overseas. I've learned quite a bit about the military. I also know a thing or two about the effects of smoking.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:36 AM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
reply to post by drock905
 


You don't "Give up your rights" your swear to a Uniform Code and the Constitution, any Legal mandates by the military to it's soldiers must be complied with otherwise you're in dereliction of duty. I'm sure you know this, but I take exception to the notion that one loses his/her rights.


What about their right to choose to smoke?

You don't seem to have a problem with them taking the little things away do you.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:39 AM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
reply to post by jd140
 


Actually it is very personal to me as I have a brother fighting overseas. I've learned quite a bit about the military. I also know a thing or two about the effects of smoking.


Wow you have a brother fighting over sees?


You must know everything about the military. I refer you to my challenge in my first post in this thread.

Man, a brother in the military...........sorry to have questioned your knowledge on the subject.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


You seem to think that I have ill will against the military. These little things have BIG consequences especially for any active combat personnel. The military is well within its rights to ban smoking by any personnel and set consequences for violations. What we know today about the effects of smoking(And from personal experience) it is in violation of their commitment to maintain THEMSELVES in as healthy a manner as they can.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:41 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


Having a brother at war kinda forces you to learn as much as you can to find out what you might be sacrificing a family member for.

[edit on 11-7-2009 by projectvxn]



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:42 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Hey, you have a brother in the military.

You are the man, I can't touch you.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


Please don't personalize this thread with little hacks like this. That's called derailing, or trolling



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


OK.

What basis are you worried about "your" military hacking their way into battle?

Can you post anything that would back up your reasoning?

I used to be under a SSG that smoked a pack a day and 3 a day when we weren't working. He could run 2 miles (the required distance in the APFT, but you knew that) in 15- 15 minutes and 40 seconds. He was 40 years old.

My PERSONAL expiereance has shown me that the majority of smokers that I have encountered do very well on distance runs.

But what do I know, I have only been in the military around 12 years now.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 04:03 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


www.uwhealth.org...

MADISON - About 50 percent of soldiers deployed to Iraq return addicted to tobacco.

Of that group, about half will die prematurely from smoking-related disease if they are unable to break free of tobacco addiction.

On average, the use of tobacco will deprive those soldiers of 10 to 14 years of life and for many, poor health will compromise the quality of those years.

"Soldiers are going to war zones in Iraq," says Dr. Michael Fiore, head of the Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, "and, God willing, they survive the imminent risks of that deployment. But they often return addicted to tobacco – a powerful addiction that puts them at risk of collateral damage for the rest of their lives."

A veteran of the United States Army Reserves himself, Fiore says that soldiers and smokes were chummy for years.

In the past, troops received cigarettes with meal rations and cheap tobacco was sold on bases. Military culture saw tobacco use as a soldier's right – something to "take the edge" off the rigors of duty.

But by the mid-'70s, the military recognized that tobacco use was taking the edge off something else: military readiness. Recruits who used tobacco didn't perform as well on tests of athletic fitness; they got hurt more often, and more recruits were failing basic training.

"Tobacco use is a lead contributor to acute infections – bronchitis and pneumonia, among others," says Fiore. "Smokers get out of breath faster. Their allergies get worse. All of these can take the edge off a soldier who needs to be at his or her best."

Over time, the military quit offering cigarettes with rations; banned indoor tobacco use on bases; required that recruits abstain from tobacco during basic training; and started offering smoking-cessation programs to soldiers.

The policy changes, plus the general social trend against smoking, did help decrease smoking. A 2007 study in Addiction found that smoking rates in the military dropped from more than 50 percent in 1980, then increased markedly starting in the late ‘90s. By 2005, about 33 percent of those in the military smoked.

Today, with U.S. soldiers fighting two wars in the Middle East, deployments are up and multiple deployments are common. While fully recognizing the dangers of fighting a stubborn insurgency, Fiore has a longer-term worry.

"What used to be an equal-opportunity killer is increasingly a concern in subgroups of the population," he says. "Young soldiers are especially vulnerable to the risks of tobacco. While smoking prevalence overall among adults has fallen to less than 20 percent, it is far higher in military personnel."




He could run 2 miles (the required distance in the APFT, but you knew that)
Actually yes I did, it's not as if the information is classified.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


You give me info that does nothing but guess?

No, you said you don't want "your" military hacking their way into battle. Show me something that supports your fear. I don't want somebody saying they might die years down the road.


We all know the effects of smoking. Smoking nazis have been shoving that crap down our throats forever now.



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 04:16 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


Here is a military research paper

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...
Occupational Medicine Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760-5007


Reliable data on the impact of physical training on light infantry units in terms of injuries and time loss are sparse. This study evaluated a light infantry unit (n = 181) prospectively and followed it throughout one year of infantry training and operations. Fifty-five percent of the soldiers (n = 101) experienced one or more injuries. Eighty-eight percent of the injuries were training-related conditions, which resulted in 1,103 days of limited duty. Lower extremity overuse injuries were the most common type of injury documented. Fractures accounted for the greatest number of days of limited duty. Risk factors for training-related injuries identified by this study were cigarette smoking, high percentage of body fat, extremely high or low body mass index, low endurance levels, and low muscular endurance levels (sit-ups). Logistic regression showed that cigarette smoking and low endurance levels were independent risk factors for training injuries. These data indicate that the incidence of training-related injuries in infantry units is high. A number of modifiable injury risk factors were identified, suggesting that many of these injuries may be preventable.




[edit on 11-7-2009 by projectvxn]



posted on Jul, 11 2009 @ 04:21 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 



1986 huh. 23 years ago.

I can pull up some info from the 50's that says smoking is good for you. Would you accept that as a counter to your artical?



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