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Keyboard Mightier than the Sword!

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posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 02:29 PM
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Hello

When I first heard of cyberwars I like probably many of you thought about geeks such as myself fighting it out over the net flinging viruses at each others systems while trying to hack into sensitive systems on the opposing sides networks. I'm sure that is going on but...

It could very well be something much simpler than that. If the US and the West really want to spread freedom and democracy around the world it's becoming abundantly clear we should be dropping laptops and internet ready cell phones instead of bombs. The past ten years have seen a tremendous explosion of personal communication around the world we are becoming a global village!


Pentagon Funds Cyber Range For Web Warriors

Feb. 24, 2009 -- Just as foot soldiers need to practice their skills before heading into combat, America's cyber warriors need space in the virtual world to hone their skills as well. That place will be the National Cyber Range, a virtual proving ground to simulate battles and develop virtual weapons to fight our nation's enemies.


With the rash of recent violent clashes everywhere from Iran to China people are finally seeing whats going on in these formerly closed societies. We here in the west may think that these sorts of violent clashes are new. The truth is that with the spread of the internet and other related technologies we in the west are getting a first hand view of what really happens in certain places in the world.


We think we have it bad...

Attack the Cyberwalls!: The Internet Is the Pathway to Democracy in Places Like Iran

The Iranian election crisis is being fought in the reaches of cyberspace as well as the streets of Tehran. Those without power or arms are dictating the flow of events -- and to some extent -- strategy through the power of the Internet.

Their weapons include YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and other forms of real-time Internet communication. Tiananmen Square survivor and Internet activist Yang Jianli writes that cyber warfare "is undermining the world's dictatorships and opening a fast lane to democracy."

Authoritarian governments like those in Iran, China, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia are fighting back with aggressive blocking and filtering systems that often use Western technology. Companies such as Google, Wikipedia and Yahoo have accepted government censorship of their in-country Web sites, in effect neutralizing the Internet's democratic promise.




Internet plays key role in China's latest unrest

BEIJING (AP) — The brawl between Han Chinese and Uighurs in southern China was scarcely covered by state media, but accounts and photos spread quickly via the Internet and became a spark that helped ignite deadly riots thousands of miles away in the Uighur homeland.

Even in tightly controlled China, relatively unfettered commentaries and images circulating on Web sites helped stir up tensions and rally people to join an initially peaceful protest in the Xinjiang region that spiraled into violence Sunday, leaving more than 150 people dead.

In China, as in Iran and other hotspots, the Internet, social networking and micro-blogging are playing a central role in mobilizing people power — and becoming contested ground as governments fight back.



I like this recent article the most. It's about the "big push" by US Marines in a territory of Afghanistan that was heavily controlled by the Taliban. It seems their biggest complaint so far has been military vehicles driving too fast through the bazarr and no cell phone coverage...


GOOOOOOOD MORNIIIIINNNG AFGHANISTAAAANNN!

Afghan DJs play tunes, break hearts in Taliban country

GARMSIR, Afghanistan (Reuters) - The DJs of Radio Garmsir in Afghanistan's lower Helmand River valley knew their station had touched a nerve when the letters started pouring in.

First a few, then more, and pretty soon 20 to 30 letters per day, hand delivered to a box outside the NATO base where they broadcast deep into Taliban territory from a desk in a tiny bunker.

Most are requests for songs. Some are complaints -- about police driving too fast through the bazaar, about the continuing failure of mobile phone companies to bring reception to the valley.


Yeah I think they Microchip has gone to war. But not in the way people originally thought.





posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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The Pentagon’s War on the Internet

By Mike Whitney

02/13/06 "ICH' -- -- The Pentagon has developed a comprehensive strategy for taking over the internet and controlling the free flow of information. The plan appears in a recently declassified document, “The Information Operations Roadmap”, which was provided under the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) and revealed in an article by the BBC.

The Pentagon sees the internet in terms of a military adversary that poses a vital threat to its stated mission of global domination. This explains the confrontational language in the document which speaks of “fighting the net”; implying that the internet is the equivalent of “an enemy weapons system."

The Defense Dept. places a high-value on controlling information. The new program illustrates their determination to establish the parameters of free speech.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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i belive that alot of cyber wars are going on sending out propaganda, disinformation etc it is an excellent way for governments to control a populace in one way or another.

a great post and i have given u a rare star i give out and flag just for the informative post you gave us



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by ronishia
 

CYBERWAR IS COMING!*

(Sproull and Kiesler, 1991: 15–16).
Effects of the Information Revolution
The information revolution reflects the advance of computerized information and communications technologies and related innovations in organization and management theory. Sea changes are occurring in how information is collected, stored, processed, communicated and presented, and in how organizations are designed to take advantage of increased information.4 Information is becoming a strategic resource that may prove as valuable and influential in the post-industrial era as capital and labor have been in the industrial
age.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 02:54 PM
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China makes viruses for cyberwar first-strike

This newest report shows how the Chinese military's thinking on information warfare has changed in recent years, said Andrew Macpherson, director of the technical analysis group at the University of New Hampshire's Justiceworks and a research assistant professor of justice studies. Macpherson, a cybercrime and cyberwar researcher whose group debuted a Cyber Threat Calculator in January at a DoD cybercrime conference, noted that as recently as two years ago, other editions of the report stressed China's investments in defensive measures.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by ronishia
i belive that alot of cyber wars are going on sending out propaganda, disinformation etc it is an excellent way for governments to control a populace in one way or another.

a great post and i have given u a rare star i give out and flag just for the informative post you gave us


Well whats really funny is I think the average Joe/Joann may have a greater impact on these situation than anybody at the top ever thought possible.
I highly doubt if there was not the internet that we in the west would have known about the girl who was shot in Iran or that more than two were killed in the Riots in China more like 158 and the number keeps going up.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:10 PM
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yea you have a point there, the populace in a lot of cases is well in control but at the same time that the *people* can get the information both classified and other wise out there so can the government agency's hense alot of disinformation etc that we see around, hence your cyber-wars.

i know that the governments agency's plant alot of the info out there deliberately and alot of the so-called top secret stuff out there they know are in circulation and they know not alot can be verified.

the internet is a great super highway for alot of people and i guess as you say we would never find out about alot of the terrible things that happen if it wasnt for it.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by ronishia
the internet is a great super highway for alot of people and i guess as you say we would never find out about alot of the terrible things that happen if it wasnt for it.


Well unfortunately all we are talking about at the present is the horrible things. But in time the Internet will live up to it's potential of a wonderful leveled playing field. Where as long as you are able to make sense your voice will be heard. It doesn't matter you personal wealth or education or even class.

One keyboard fits all



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:38 PM
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Yep, the microchip HAS gone to war now, in many more ways than people realize. The recent unrest in Iran illustrated that dramatically. With the interwebs spread across the planet and interconnected as they are, a ready tool for this sort of activity is at the disposal of any and all who can think outside the box, and make use of it. It's but one facet of warfare, but one that has long been with us in one guise or another, the "Information War" or "Psychological Warfare". In other words the war for minds.

The internet IS an enemy weapons system. It's also a friendly weapons system. Much like a firearm, it's an impartial tool, given meaning and direction by the hand that grasps it.

China has the Great Firewall. Other countries have similar concepts, such as Iran and Syria, to name but two. The intent is to 'censor' information flow, controlling both in and out boxes to control the info presented to citizens from outside, thus quelling the envy that may lead to dissatisfaction with the status quo within the country (the grass is always greener.. mentality) and the info presented to the outside to 'spin' external perceptions of the country so employing the censorship, and present the offending country in a positive and benevolent light.

Several other countries are exploring the possibilities of net filtering, to achieve the same ends, but I don't believe it will work. Not for long, and not any better than it did in China or Iran.

An encrypted proxy program suite called "TOR" is the friend of those who would circumvent such restrictions. Google it, you may be glad you did. I ran it 24/7 on all my machines through the Iranian Unrest, as a proxy node to help get the info out of Iran. Ditto with the current Chinese situation. It works wonders for any net traffic of any sort trying to escape the chains of totalitarianism, and is in use by many factions world wide to that end. Check it out.

Encryption is your friend, the stronger the better. When you're trying to electronically smuggle information on the current state of affairs out of an odious dictatorship, it helps if the folks in charge of the smuggling routes in your local area can't packet sniff and find out what's outgoing. They can't block it if they don't know what to block. The more people who make use of it, even for the most mundane of reasons, create a huge pile of encrypted information that must be sifted through to find the nugget. Enterprising folk then make sure there are none to be found, thus creating a huge waste of time and effort for the sifters. Meanwhile, the 'useful' nuggets of information are bouncing all around the world from proxy to proxy, until they get to a useful place.

Cyberwar. It's not just for governments anymore.

Defensively, there are numerous softwares available that will let you know when someone tries to break into YOUR machine, and give you their IP. There are others that will allow you to trace that number back to it's origin. My own computer has been scanned by persons in China (innumerable times), Eastern Europe (Romania, Bulgaria, etc...), and Africa (South Africa, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe), among a few other isolated places. I bet yours have too.

Was it government? Individuals? Who cares? The important point is that the intrusion was detected and blocked, it's point of origin identified, and no information was lost. Is my computer particularly valuable? No. Some attackers will just scan an entire range of thousands or millions of IP numbers, attempting to find just a few unsecured machines. They use them for several different purposes, both government and civilian. Defensively, your main goal is to insure that your machine is not compromised. It matters not by whom. There are thousands out there, with their own affiliations. I don't want ANY of them in my machine, except the ones I allow, for my own purposes.



[edit on 2009/7/7 by nenothtu]



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Thats funny you mentioned that. Why even here at ATS I received a password change request in an email traced from China. I fired off a notice to TPTB here at ATS to let them know what happened and never heard back from them about this issue.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:46 PM
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Mobs spread ethnic strife in western China

Chinese officials have largely dismissed claims that the Urumqi rioting was caused by long-simmering resentments among the Uighurs. They said the crowds were stirred up by U.S.-exiled Uighur activist Rebiya Kadeer and her overseas followers, who used the Internet to spread rumors.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:57 PM
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Interesting concept. In spite of a government's efforts to block materials or certain topics, we all know there's a hacker who can crack anything!

Of course this provides a great opportunity to spread the word, but there's something much more sinister that would imply the keyboard is mightier than the sword . . .

Reportedly fully operational in the early 1990's, and reportedly used against Iraqi troops in Operation Desert Storm, 200,000 Iraqis were so relieved to surrender to coalition forces, kissing their boots, and even weeping with joy at being taken prisoner.

It is suggested that aside from the military pounding SSSS (Silent Sound Spread Spectrum) has been really bouncing around in their minds, creating a mind tearing experience.

This can be turned against the American people (and may be already, given the mindless adoration of the Great Pretender Obama) for purposes of enabling compliance with NWO moves anticipated to be forthcoming.

You ever wonder why the US Government was so adament about all Americans having HDTV? That's right. Only HDTV can enable a more effective transmission, and you don't even know what's happening.

Same thing with computers and the internet. Some programs can literally scramble a person's brain because while the conscious cannot detect it, the subconscious doesn't miss a thing.

This technology bag will increasingly become a weapon far more devastating than nuclear weapons.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by nenothtu
 


Thats funny you mentioned that. Why even here at ATS I received a password change request in an email traced from China. I fired off a notice to TPTB here at ATS to let them know what happened and never heard back from them about this issue.


China is known to be heavily into government sponsored cyber war efforts, and has a sizeable population of individual hackers as well. Add to that the number of machines that have been compromised worldwide (including in China) by both types of hackers to use as proxy nodes and for DDoS attacks, and it's not really surprising that a goodly portion of attacks appear to originate from China. That one sounds rather targetted, but a huge number of them are just port scans looking for an unguarded back door into computers.

The US has a huge cyber war program too, but you rarely ever hear about it...


One worry is that so many modern systems (like power grids) are for some unfathomable reason jacked in to the interwebs, instead of maintaining their own isolated networks.

THAT could get exciting if someone decided to invite us to a war...

[edit on 2009/7/7 by nenothtu]



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by dooper
 


The HDTV push also concerned me. I first heard of it in jan, 2008, in a "public service announcement" on late night tv in the wee hours of the morning, and it was already a done deal then. It struck me as odd, the way it was being introduced, so i asked some tech-savvy friends about it. They looked at me like I'd just stepped out of a UFO, said they'd never heard of any such thing, and it'd never happen. Said I hallucinated the PSA, and that the hat band on my tin foil hat must be a little too tight.


3 months later, they came to me and said "oops".

My initial concern was that digital signals are much easier to control than analog. A digital receiver can be remotely programmed to reject ANY signal, especially "rogue" ones like the old underground radio stations. Just look at how easy it is for satellite TV providers to shut down your whole receiver from a central location somewhere. They can only do that because it's digital.

I thought it was solely for information control. You insight, in combination with that, drops it to a whole new level of sinister.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 

Not a year ago, I was talking to a guy who had a program that would be able to be inserted into a target's computer, and using advanced physics of photon manipulation, could literally make that person go mad. Completely scramble his brain.

He told me if I ever had an enemy, to get him a photograph of the place where he lived and his grid coordinates. That's all he needed. And he could terrify this guy from a thousand miles away.

I never called him up on that, but that SOB ex-son-in-law better tone it all down or I'll rethink my position.

It's bad enough that a person in a glass room can be given a terminal disease electronically through the glass without ever having come in contact with this disease.

Now they're weaponizing computer terminals and televisions.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


I liked how that video posted talked about a cyber exchange that broke supposedly between us and Chinese hackers when in reality it was between Chinese and a group from eastern Europe



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 06:26 PM
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Originally posted by dooper

He told me if I ever had an enemy, to get him a photograph of the place where he lived and his grid coordinates. That's all he needed. And he could terrify this guy from a thousand miles away.



Yup, that's pretty much all one needs. There's a database, that's getting bigger all the time,of the lat/long coordinates of the end points of each IP address. That's how I track attempted intrusions here.

So with a set of grids, you can back track to the IP, then verify from the photo via satellite pics.

Of course, if you start out with the IP, it's a lot easier. Then you can get it in via unlocked 'back doors' built in to some software and operating systems.

Stuff like that is also frequently installed by the user himself, tricked into it using "social engineering", which just boils down to psychology - you tell 'em it's something they can't resist, they run it, and it installs.

I never used anything like he was talking about, but the principle is sound. All my stuff was for info gathering back in the day when I did that sort of thing. Used to be able to light up webcams and mics remotely for surveillance too. That's why this machine don't have any such things attached.

Strange how a blink on a video tube, TV or computer, can ruin your whole day - forever like.

Edit: thumb-fingered spelling errors.



[edit on 2009/7/7 by nenothtu]



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by nenothtu
 


I liked how that video posted talked about a cyber exchange that broke supposedly between us and Chinese hackers when in reality it was between Chinese and a group from eastern Europe


Hackers are a fun-loving bunch... they just love a cyber-whompin' and don't much care WHO it's against!



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 11:01 PM
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Whoa is everything digital these days?



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