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What causes these formations on the Moon?

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posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 10:38 PM
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What causes these formations on the moon?





This is from the new Moon photos, specifically "Northwest of Anaxagoras A"... there are several of them on that picture.... but what causes those formations?




posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


I would suggest you are talking about pyramid shaped object to the center of the image? If so, it is usually meteorites that have hit the moon and failed to break up. Meteorites and/or space rock are also responsible for the cheese like craters surrounding the moon.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 

Very interesting question HunkaHunka,you have google that is a good tool and say NASA they could help your research.
When you find the answer let us know I would be interested in what you find

Zelong.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:39 PM
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It looks like mountain or hill on the moon that's partially lit from one side.
Hills and mountains were probably formed when the moon still had some geologic forces, or from meteor impacts.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:53 PM
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if you ask me it looks like a pyramid constructed by an ancient alien race. but that's a whole different story.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 12:18 AM
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There are several processes which produce roughly conical peaks on the Moon. The central peaks formed by impacts are are one example.

But the shadows produced by low sun angles can be deceptive. Even quite irregular features can produce symmetrical shadows. Being human, our eyes tend to pounce on symmetry.


A close look at the peak producing the shadow in the OP image shows that it is not nearly as symmetrical as the shadow would have us think. We can't see the portion within the shadow but our visual systems create a nice cone for us anyway.



posted on Jul, 7 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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its not as tall as you think. its a small mound, with a lond shadow being cast by the sun low in the horizon, giving the illusion from a birds eye view of it beng tall because of the lond shadow



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


Sorry I don't have the answer to your question.
But as you say, a lot.
More than fifteen.

Some shadows are very long. Should be high.


Take a look a some CGI in this link.
THE AGES OF URAS
Search for "Šàlim city street plan"
very speculative idea.

or look the second video of this thread at 1:33 and 1:38. speculative too.
ATS: NASA Moon Anomalies III - Other Peoples Work


Christmas holidays.
Peace.

Time to take a break, and read some Hopi Prophecies.
Native American Prophecies (Morgana's Observatory)




[edit on 26-12-2009 by mixmix]



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 04:01 AM
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another picture of anaxagoras from another LRO image



very good link for shadow basics
vlg.org: Out of the Shadows: The Problem of Slopes

If somebody can found a good example of penumbra shadow on a LRO image ?

a basic knowledge.
HeightOfObject = LengthOfShadow x tan (sun angle) in a flat area.

[edit on 29-12-2009 by mixmix]

[edit on 29-12-2009 by mixmix]

[edit on 29-12-2009 by mixmix]



posted on Dec, 30 2009 @ 01:40 AM
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another picture of anaxagoras

from nacr00000141.tif 25Mo(small)
LROC: Northwest of Anaxagoras A

The Left/Right are inverted from wms site.
The brightness is not the same.

If you zoom in the tiff, you'll see 2 vertical strips on all the picture.
But on the website, this strips have disapeared.

So what's means "Uncalibred view" ?
What is a raw file ?
Is tiff a raw format ?

check this link ?
photo.net: RAW, JPEG and TIFF



posted on Jan, 30 2010 @ 05:50 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I think the OP was probably asking how these features form, in the ABSENCE of a meteorite impact/crater formation, such as in the image he posted for reference.

My guess would be it is an old impact crater, and what we are seeing is the top of the central peak. The crater itself and the bulk of the peak being buried under billions of years of dust and debris from ejecta and such.

OR of course, it was built artificially.



posted on Jan, 30 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by spikey
 


Or, it's just a rock which because of the low lighting angle produces a symmetrical shadow. The feature does not have to be as regular as the shadow would have us believe.




Posted by Phage
But the shadows produced by low sun angles can be deceptive. Even quite irregular features can produce symmetrical shadows. Being human, our eyes tend to pounce on symmetry.



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 07:39 AM
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another LRO picture from the same area
hundreds of shadows with low sun angle


LROC Observation M104575388L

LROC Observation M104575388LC



[edit on 10-4-2010 by mixmix]



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:24 PM
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Here's an example of how low sun-angles can cause long shadows from short objects:




posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by Saint Exupery
 


Hi st ex

I'm agree with you that cone object give a cone shadow.

But there's no 80 m shellfish on the moon.

And you proove that these shadows come from a cone shaped object.

And about this one


a shellfish ?

just kidding



posted on Apr, 13 2010 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by Saint Exupery
 



another part of LRO image M102220533R



Do you see the shellfish triangular shadow ?



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