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Martial Law Preparations Made in Seward, AK?

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posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:17 PM
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I found an interesting YouTube video that shows some bridge reconstruction made during earlier martial law military drills from spring 2008.

Perhaps somebody can make better meaning out of this YouTube video?



[edit on 6-7-2009 by MOFreemason]




posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:22 PM
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I'm sure there is a perfectly logical explanation for it!!!!!!!!!!


Seriously, great post and that is VERY bizarre. Wow. Why is it things like that were never used on nor necessary for bridges 50 years ago? Society, especially in Alaska hasn't changed all that much that would necessitate a device like that on a bridge in Seward, AK. It's time to wake up people! Even if you are far removed from the conspiracy/NWO subculture things like this are just too coincidental to ignore in my opinion.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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What I didn't understand about the video though, is they mentioned how it can lock people in. How? Do the gates swing to control flow of traffic in/out?

That part confused me.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


Same here, it sort of looks like they might swing down to look like this :

___
|
|

but I didn't see how that is possible. It's all interlocking. If anything it would be used to obstruct the view of snipers.

I don't know, I haven't ever seen anything like that before.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


It looked to me like the sides were just giant legos you could stack across the road.

They showed how they come right apart and how there is already large steel beams to hold the bridge.

It's like they put it there as "blinders", but they actually come right apart and are large steel boxes that can be linked together and strung across roads to create road blocks.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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Wow, Alaskans are paranoid. That steel structure you see is a support structure. Those holes in the I beams for "locking" people in are actually just connectors to the next piece. Those pieces were prefabricated. They're made to fit into the next one. If they wanted to "lock" you in Seward, they would have put up gates.

Either the bridge is old or there is now a bit more traffic on the bridge. Either way, the bridge needed to be reinforced.

Edit: The way they were suggesting this steel "locks" you in is by attaching a crossbeam at the end of the I-beams. IMO it would be too fragile and could easily be broken by a pissed off dodge ram.

[edit on 6-7-2009 by Sliick]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:58 PM
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I don't think those things come apart at all. The holes or female "ports" so to speak that were in the video look like probably some sort of gate is attached and locked into place at either end of the bridge. These gates are probably in some depot or warehouse down the road or in the next town. It\ don't think the devices come apart. They look all solidly welded. And I don't see how they would prevent a sniper from being able to hit targets on the bridge. Looks like something to simply attach a gate to to make the gate that much stronger.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
They probably have prefab gates they can bring in and install them over 'X' amount of time... a hour, maybe minutes...

The amount of struts and bracing for this type of bridge seems a bit too extreme unless they needed it strong to prevent, say, a truck from ramming through the gates or for tanks to go over the bridge.

What's going to stop people from crossing the rivers on foot, is what I'm wondering about.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by Zosynspiracy
 


Well it would obscure a snipers view. It wouldn't prevent a sniper from shooting.

But the gates explanation makes sense. I don't see how they could come apart without using a crane.

I just did a quick search and it appears that they are doing a lot of bridge reconstruction up in Alaska and this is probably very mundane. Has nothing to do with Martial law.

If they wanted to prevent people from leaving there would be armed guards. I'm with the poster that said this is to structurally reinforce the bridge.

Besides I doubt DHS is going to go around leaving signs of coming Martial Law out in the open like that.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:03 PM
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The eyeloops in the ends are for inserting steel rods to block non-foot traffic for checkpoints. There is no way to block foot traffic without ridiculous amounts of fencing.

They can also serve as crane loops so a crane can lift them without putting undo stress on the actual frame part.

The jury is still out on that one. With Sarah Palin stepping down I'm sure many think that the proverbial cold day in hell is here.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:05 PM
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It bugged me the way the person who edited it repeatedly used "an" instead of "and."

Doesn't really lend much credibility to an otherwise somewhat ok video...

[edit on 6-7-2009 by alaskan]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:11 PM
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In the lower 48k, we call this bridge supports. The shape, the design, the layout, all suggest a means to add additional support to the bridge.

Maybe they anticipated a crack in the older supports and decided to increase the support while it's still timely.

If you want to block a bridge, you can block a bridge. You don't even need a gate. Nor a barrier. Nor such an elaborate structural enhancement such as this.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



A few armed guards could easily be run down by a huge thoroughfare of traffic.

Even if those things are simply just reinforcements what the hell happened to putting them "UNDER' the bridge. They are an eyesore of the highest order. Which lends even more credence to the argument that they may not be permanent.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by dooper
 


True you could just plop a few tanks in the middle of them.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by Zosynspiracy
 


I guess the engineers did the mathematics and determined that was the structure that needed to be built to support the loads.

It is an eye sore, but that bit of construction would be cheaper than building an entire new bridge.

We only have limited information from the video and then he really only showed us ends and not what the actual structure looks like up close going across the bridge or what it looks like underneath the bridge.

The other thing that throws up a red flag about it is how they didn't stay in Seward because "they" were going to "lock them in".



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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It's just BS. Those railings do not come apart. It appears more like standard support beams were used to build an barrier to prevent vehicles from going over in the event of an accident to save money. Also in Alaska the bridge at mile 25 going to Anchorage from Seward spans a rather deep gorge.

And yes I know that road very well having driven and travelled that road from Seward through Moose Pass on the way to Anchorage, and have lost a couple of friends over that particular bridge over 20 years ago.

Lock them in.............
You got to be kidding me, BS artist fearmongering, no basis for that, as Seward only has 1 road that leads into or out of it, and several high passes on that road out, would be very easy to blockade long before you get to the bridge. And what good would it do to blockade the town as 3/4 of the residents own their own commercial fishing boats



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by Zosynspiracy
 


A few armed guards would or could be run down or over? Not with me behind the trigger.

I'd pick my target, neutralize my target, and now that vehicle is blocking everything.

Don't tell me. You've never ambushed a column, have you?



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


Actually, I have seen bridges like that one in other places...namely the tempoary supports for I10 east of New Orleans. It is just a re-enforced bridge of a new design that's all. Nothing special about it. I would go back and see when the last bridge was built and why they tore it down?

Oh, and why is it so high- I would guess so people do not drive off of it or fish.



[edit on 6-7-2009 by ShadowMaster]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 05:58 PM
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I did not watch the video, but a couple of things to keep in mind; this is tsunami and earthquake country. Seward was hit hard by a tsunami when Anchorage had the earthquake in 1964. Seward is also the home of the only prison in Alaska, I believe. They built a new one on the east side of the bay. As the earlier poster said, there is only one road and one rail line into Seward. Blocking those two wouldn't be too hard, but blocking Alaskans from getting out overland or by sea would be a different matter. Oh by the way, the US Army (at least used to) have a very nice recreation camp there, but it's been there for years. No conspiracy there, just a great place to vacation. They have some fantastic fishing.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 06:43 PM
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I have been to Seward.
Alaskans are not paranoid. The person in the video is paranoid.

IMO - though I have no proof of this. It is to prevent people from crossing the bridge during flooding. Recently there was major flood in that area. And to keep the bridges in tact.

This is the road into Seward back in 2006:







[edit on July 6th 2009 by greeneyedleo]



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