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UQ researchers break the law - of physics

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posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 09:07 AM
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UQ researchers break the law - of physics


www.uq.edu.au

Two UQ Science researchers have proved two famous physical laws that have been widely used for the past 25 years do not always work.

Dr Tony Roberts and PhD student Christophe P. Haynes, from the School of Maths and Physics, showed the fractal-Einstein and Alexander-Orbach laws can fail in some instances, and have derived a new law to replace them.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 09:07 AM
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This stuff is way above my pay grade
but I thought there would be some members interested in this news coming from Australia.

Are we looking at something huge? Or just a slight adjustment to fill a gap in how the laws are applied?

Be gentle, I said this was beyond me..


The paper will be published on the 17th of July and you can find it here:

prl.aps.org...




www.uq.edu.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 7/6/2009 by JacKatMtn]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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HA! Above my pay grade too! This seems pretty exciting to me, though....... seems like dimensional fractals, and might have implications for electromagnetic propagation
Imagine..... could be a unification of c and g hidden in there somewhere, or quantum gravitational propagation....... or just pretty pictures. Hard to guess.


Thanks for the .'s up!



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 09:42 AM
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This sounds like they are borrowing some of Rupert Sheldrake and Terence Mckenna's concepts.


Maybe soon the morphic field theory will go mainstream.


+13 more 
posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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Some would say that on 911 the rules of physics were broke 3 times...



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:03 AM
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The research, titled Generalisation of the fractal Einstein law relating conduction and diffusion on networks, will be published in the July 17 issue of Physical Review Letters. An advance copy will be available on the journal's website on July 14.


I can't wait to see this.

Good find.


[edit on 6-7-2009 by Maxmars]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by Redpillblues
Some would say that on 911 the rules of physics were broke 3 times...


Some would say that the day JFK was assassinated the rules of physics were broken as well.

This is fascinating stuff starred and flagged to the OP.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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Wow this is news, i have star and flag this thread
+ i gave some links to my friends!



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:28 PM
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Can anyone attempt to explain in layman's terms the possible impact of this news?

I thought this was exciting too, but I have no idea what this could be used for....

Help me, to understand, and please no BIG words


[edit on 7/6/2009 by JacKatMtn]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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Interesting article. Very good find. Ok, in laymen's terms... Previous scientific equations for fractal physics gave equal value to items we know are not the same.

Their new equation accurately (according to the scientists) measures differences between two outcomes, and possible speed variances.

What this means is a way to better predict disease epidemics spreading, biotoxin distribution, etc.

To sum it up, fractal physics is the study of patterns in chaos. They came up with a better formula to develop a more accurate pattern.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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Basically, it says that particles flow towards the path of least resistance. Its one of those "duh" findings. While most people could assume such a thing, there hasn't been any equation to work it out. They have apparently come up with one. If they follow a path of least resistance, that means that certain (read: all) events are not equally probable as an outcome.


I am looking forward to reading this when it comes out.

edit to note the impecable color scheme taste of the poster above me albeit with a slightly different shade of green.


[edit on 6-7-2009 by Eitimzevinten]



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by TLomon
 


Thank you so much


It makes much more sense to me now, I appreciate your explanation.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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Doesn't this also mean they could be wrong about many many other things.

If they were wrong about this and people have assumed it correct for years.

What else are they wrong about?



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Gasp! You mean what we know of physics is wrong!? That we don't know everything about it and assume we do!? NO WAI!


As if our friends from afar haven't already proved that to us hehe. Great article though it's a huge advancement.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Strictsum
Doesn't this also mean they could be wrong about many many other things.

If they were wrong about this and people have assumed it correct for years.

What else are they wrong about?



Check out my thread Aristotle set back science for almost 2000 years

If we get our full life times, it would not be surprising if some laws that we have been using will be changed, or edited, and when we get more information hopefully we will be given new laws. It's possible we are working with erroneous laws of physics right now that may not be discovered to be flawed for a 100 years, in that time who knows how much could have been different if the truth were to have been used.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:40 PM
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Excellent proof that we don't understand everything we claim to understand.




posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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Science has great pretensions about itself. It regards itself as a meta-theory rather than a set of tools.

If you look back at the history of science, it is always the people who have taken the most flak and had their careers destroyed that turn out to be the harbingers of "truth" (whatever that is).



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by king9072
 


The thing I worry about is being wrong about something major. I'm nowhere near qualified to talk in "science speak" so I won't even try, but there could be and probably are things that if they would just open their minds to could change everything for everyone. This just proves that science should reexamine everything it thinks it knows. They start experiments with a set of assumptions but what if those assumptions are wrong?

I was reading a thread the other day about some footprints they found being either 40000 years old or 1.3 million years old. The age of these prints would help determine when people crossed the land bridge into North America. Either way 40,000 or 1.3m what they had previously thought was wrong. The best case scenario, known science was wrong by 20000 years.

I just wish they would quit acting as if they know everything and realize they don't know anything, it's all a guess. Until somebody with better credentials comes along and guesses better.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by TLomon
 


Is this type of physics used to help determine the effects of Global Warming?



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by Strictsum
Is this type of physics used to help determine the effects of Global Warming?


Technically no, since global warming is a myth perpetuated by politicans with their own agendas. However, it should be useful for determining the effects of climate change.




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