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Super Diamonds to replace Silicon

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posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:09 AM
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The theory goes that these "Super Diamonds" could replace silicon. They are said to be more effecient heat conductors and what not.


""Diamond chips can work at a temperature of up to 1000 degrees Celsius, while silicon chips stop working above 150 degrees Celsius, according to Hideyo Okushi, principal research scientist at Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, which has been researching diamond chips in several projects. This property means that diamond chips can work at a much higher frequency or faster speed and be placed in a high-temperature environment, such as a vehicle's engine.""

www.pcworld.com...


www.videosift.com...

[edit on 6-7-2009 by Mr. Toodles]




posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by Mr. Toodles
 


So the Japanese are going to lead the way into the use of crystals in technology? I wonder if they are going to find a way to program the crystals or use them as "hard drives" for storage purposes???



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 01:49 AM
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reply to post by rangersdad
 


I didn't see anything on diamonds being used for storage. Although there is some research going on with Crystals being used as storage devices. Can't find any links at the moment, will get back on that one tomorrow after I get some sleep.



posted on Jul, 6 2009 @ 03:59 AM
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Diamond might have more potential than silicon, but silicon isn't going anywhere anytime soon. We have far too much infrastructure based on silicon manufacturing, and we know more about the science and engineering of silicon for electronics than any other material, such as germanium or gallium arsenide.

I wouldn't be surprised if diamond could be made such that it would be used in high end electronics, where the buyer is willing to pay top dollar for better performance (like the military) but I don't think it will be economically viable for consumer electronics for a long time.



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