It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mission: Mason

page: 2
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 8 2004 @ 03:44 PM
link   
Zuzubar:

I have never been one to advocate nor shun and individuals inquiries into joining Masonry, it is not my place, and ultimately not my decision, it is yours. Many say the "path finds you" and with this I agree. You must ask yourself why you wish to join, what is your motivation, what do you hope to gain, to learn, and again why? Many join Masonry for all the wrong reasons, not really understanding what they are getting into and why. It is a wonderful thing, but it is not for everyone. My advice to you is to research the Rites, find out whatever you can both postive and negative, true and false. Then with the proper tools in hand make your decision based upon what you feel in your heart.

Travel Safely




posted on May, 11 2004 @ 04:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by Leveller

You have to be clear of one thing, dude.
Masonry is not a church or a religion. Some of the guys I know do use it as a substitute for going to church, but that's a personal thing for them alone.
Don't expect to join masonry and get preached to as in church or have everyone agree with you that your god is exactly the same as theirs. There are many faiths and creeds within masonry and it is up to each man to make his own mind up about God.

You will be joining a body of like-minded men, but freemasons don't discuss religion in lodge.


I am well aware of this and sorry for the tone but I do not need things spelled out for me. I use to go to church in attempt to better my self and was shocked by how many are hypocrits and I do NOT like the wishy-washy praise and worship lip service and phoney baloney church stories.

I firmly believe religion is a personal thing and discussing it is pointless because everyone has their own opinion and it is too easy to offend a weakminded persons beliefs.



posted on May, 12 2004 @ 01:57 AM
link   
sorry if i missed the post but why would anyone want to become a mason and are there any benefits?? and how is this a "secret society?"



posted on May, 16 2004 @ 04:07 AM
link   
Correcting more slight infractions and inaccuracies.

There are 4 degrees of Freemasonry, only 3 of which you receive in the Blue Lodge. But if you wish to have ALL the "history" of actual Masonry you have to continue the first part of the York Rite until you reach Mark Master Mason.

Mark Master was the 4th degree that was taught in all regular Antient Free and Accepted Masonic lodges, those were under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, which rose to challenge the "changes" the Grand Lodge of England made.

It wasn't until what 1830s that the two Grand Lodges set aside their differences, hence the "great unification" or whatever, which is why now formally it is the UGLoE (United Grand Lodge of England).

Any historical errors there? Not sure so I ask. But I do believe that about covers it.

Anyways, so while a 3rd degree can do everything there is to do in Masonry, the 4th degree is still a part of Masonry, it's just found only in the York Rite.

This also answers any question you ever had concerning why some lodges are Antient and others are not.

Anyways, being a "high level" mason isn't so much as being a 33rd degree, as it is by being a Grand Master or Master of a Lodge or such.

Anything past 3rd is really just gravy. And anything in the Scotish Rite is really only best known in America. It doesn't really have much popularity outside of America.

And come to think of it, I know that a Past Grand Master in my Lodge is a 32nd or such, but I've never once felt he was superior since becomming a Master Mason, in the Blue Lodge, we are both Master Masons, he's is however a PGM and knows a HECK of a lot about Masonry



posted on May, 16 2004 @ 06:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by egotesticle
sorry if i missed the post but why would anyone want to become a mason and are there any benefits?? and how is this a "secret society?"


1. Is Freemasonry a Secret Society?
Answer provided by the Grand Lodge of Scotland. at www.grandlodgescotland.com...
Hardly! You are reading this are you not? The perception that Freemasonry is in some way secret has arisen relatively recently simply because Freemasons value their privacy. This is no different from many other organisations that keep their affairs private from people who are not members. If you asked a golf club, of which you are not a member, for details of the membership, committee minutes, etc. then you can safely assume the reply - should the club concerned be courteous enough even to answer. This basic right to privacy applies equally to Trades Unions, Private Clubs, Political Parties, Churches, etc. as well as to individuals.

Now, what are the benefits... Well, the benefits are what you get out of it. Please check the Grand Lodges site and it will give you a deeper view of freemasonry.



posted on May, 16 2004 @ 09:21 AM
link   
Based on racism, created by racist, promoting mysticism and magic, most of you are white, aren't you (no disrespect, just rying to make a point, seriously).Not saying youare racists at all, but, it seems to me that the masons were originally evil in intentions, I am sorry.All of you I want to join people need a hug or something.I bet if all or you were getting p1ssed on your back by a politician, and he told you it was just rain, you would believ that too
right on brotheren, right on!



posted on May, 16 2004 @ 10:47 AM
link   

Originally posted by jhova
Based on racism, created by racist, promoting mysticism and magic, most of you are white, aren't you (no disrespect, just rying to make a point, seriously).Not saying youare racists at all, but, it seems to me that the masons were originally evil in intentions, I am sorry.All of you I want to join people need a hug or something.I bet if all or you were getting p1ssed on your back by a politician, and he told you it was just rain, you would believ that too
right on brotheren, right on!


This is a question that can not be answered. There is no requirement to put your ethnic origin when joining Freemasonry. There simply is no where on the application form which says " what colour are you ". There is no record kept of what colour or what religion or what crede any Mason is when he joins or at any time thereafter.

My associates , Brethren are white, black, yellowish and brownish. I am a sort of pinky color. If it does not trouble us why should it bother you.

If you have any proof of occult worship then please bring it on.

[Edited on 16-5-2004 by billmcelligott]



posted on May, 16 2004 @ 11:20 AM
link   

Originally posted by FreeMason
There are 4 degrees of Freemasonry, only 3 of which you receive in the Blue Lodge. But if you wish to have ALL the "history" of actual Masonry you have to continue the first part of the York Rite until you reach Mark Master Mason.
Mark Master was the 4th degree that was taught in all regular Antient Free and Accepted Masonic lodges, those were under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, which rose to challenge the "changes" the Grand Lodge of England made.
It wasn't until what 1830s that the two Grand Lodges set aside their differences, hence the "great unification" or whatever, which is why now formally it is the UGLoE (United Grand Lodge of England).
Any historical errors there? Not sure so I ask.


Only that the Degree in question is that of Royal Arch Mason, instead of Mark Master. The Constitution of the United Grand Lodge of England, adopted at the merger between the Antient and Modern Grand Lodges, reads as follows: “Pure Antient Masonry consists of three degrees, viz., Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason, which includes the Supreme Order of the Holy Royal Arch.”
The Antient Lodges conferred the Royal Arch on Past Masters, but the Modern Lodges did not recognize the degree. The schism came to an end by proclaiming the Royal Arch to be part of the Master’s Degree, but conferred separately.
The Degree of Mark Master is younger than the Royal Arch, and is an adjunct to the Fellow Craft Degree, even though one must be a Master Mason to receive it. In the US and Canada, the Degree of Mark Master is the first of four degrees conferred in a Chapter of Royal Arch Mason, preparatory to the Royal Arch itself. In most other countries, Lodges of Mark Master Masons are chartered by Grand Mark Lodges, who work independently of Royal Arch Chapters.


This also answers any question you ever had concerning why some lodges are Antient and others are not.


I am in the process of writing a paper on this subject (which is becoming quite lengthy) to hopefully be published earlier next year. If you’re interested, I’ll forward you a copy on completion. In the US, all of the Grand Lodges of Antient York Masons (A.Y.M.) have merged with the Grand Lodges of Free and Accepted Masons (F.&A.M.) in their respective jurisdictions. The schism lasted longer in the US than in the UK, with the last US mergers occuring around 30 years after the UGLE was formed. It is a fascinating subject, but literally requires a volume to detail this intricate (and often confusing) history of the Craft.


Anyways, being a "high level" mason isn't so much as being a 33rd degree, as it is by being a Grand Master or Master of a Lodge or such.


I agree completely. To receive a degree, all a Brother has to do is apply for it, and pay initiation fees. Anybody can do that. But to be elected Master of a Lodge, or Grand Master of a Grand Lodge, by the universal suffrage of his Brethren are the highest honors, and most important responsibility, in all of the Fraternity. My Brethren elected me Master of my Lodge in 2002, and it was a humbling experience; I can only pray that I served the Craft while in Office only half as well as my predecessors.


Anything past 3rd is really just gravy. And anything in the Scotish Rite is really only best known in America. It doesn't really have much popularity outside of America.


I must disagree with this point. While it is true that the core teachings of the Craft are found in the first three degrees, they are elaborated upon in the appendant degrees in a manner worthy of the Mason’s time and energy.
As for the Scottish Rite, it is the most widely diffused Masonic Rite in the world. Outside of English-speaking countries (whose Blue Lodges are almost universally of the York Rite), the vast majority of the Blue Lodges work in the Scottish and Schroeder Rites.

Fiat Lvx.


[Edited on 16-5-2004 by Masonic Light]



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 01:20 AM
link   
Eh I don't disagree with anything you posted Light...but we obviously have some differing opinions


But to try and have one more similar opinion, when I say anything beyond the 3rd is really just "gravy" I don't mean it as if it is just fluff. The Scottish Rite is a lot of history, so is the York, everything is a lot of history, and going through it puts a LOT more into context.

Anyways, I think you got what I was getting at about the 4th degree, it's my belief that that is the only degree beyond the 3 that are actually a part of Masonry in any way. The others were invented solely apart from Masonry even if they were invented by Masons with Masonry in mind.

My opinion anyways



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 01:24 AM
link   
Oh but about the Antient Lodge,s I'm still under the impression there are Lodges in Pennsylvania and Massachusettes I think, that are "Antient Free and Accepted"...even though they are under Grand Lodges as you stated, they still go by that title.

Is that the case still or have they done away with that.



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 11:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by FreeMason
Oh but about the Antient Lodge,s I'm still under the impression there are Lodges in Pennsylvania and Massachusettes I think, that are "Antient Free and Accepted"...even though they are under Grand Lodges as you stated, they still go by that title.
Is that the case still or have they done away with that.


Yes, it’s still the case. American Grand Lodges with “Ancient” or “Antient” in the title usually indicate that it is the result of a merger between A.Y.M. and F.&A.M., while those who are only F.&A.M. generally show states where the A.Y.M. Grand Lodges did not penetrate. My own Grand Lodge is a result of a merger, having both Antient and Modern lineage.
From what I’ve personally noticed, the major difference between the F.&A.M.ers and the merged GLs is that the latter recognizes the Degree of Past Master, which is conferred on the Master-elect as part of his installation (other countries sometimes call this degree Installed Master). At the conferral, all but actual Past Masters are excused from the Lodge room, and the Master-elect is invested with the mysteries of that Degree. There may be a couple of F.&A.M. Grand Lodges that control this degree, but I’m not personally aware of any.
As for your statement in the other thread, I will concede that I mislabeled the Regius Poem as a “Constitution”, as I fell into Mackey’s somewhat erroneous terminology. Technically, I should have called it a York or Gothic “Manuscript”, since it not constitutional. You are also correct concerning the date (in the 10th century) of the legendary York meeting. My comment that the alleged convention occured during the 9th century was drawn from memory, which isn’t always faithful. Next time I’ll look it up first.


Fiat Lvx.

[Edited on 17-5-2004 by Masonic Light]



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 05:57 PM
link   
Hello!

I actually have a question about American Freemasonry. Up here, because of the way in which Freemasonry came to Canada, we use many different versions of the ritual in certain jurisdictions. For example, in my jurisdiction of Alberta, we use both the "Canadian Rite" and the "York Rite," with of course co-visitation and complete equality (thus I have seen both rituals, and they are very different.
My understanding is that in the jurisdiction of BC and the Yukon, they have SIX different types of ritual work, including Canadian Rite, Ancient York Rite, Emulation, etc.
It is also my understanding that in the States, you only have one version of the work, which is supposedly quite close to what we call the "York Rite" in Alberta. Is this so?



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 07:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by AlexKennedy
It is also my understanding that in the States, you only have one version of the work, which is supposedly quite close to what we call the "York Rite" in Alberta. Is this so?


With the exception of one, all U.S. Grand Lodges work in a York Rite ritual, derived from Webb and Cross, and the Prestonian lectures. Rituals are not absolutely identical from state to state, but are generally pretty close.
One Grand Lodge (either Pennsylvania, Virginia, or West Virginia, it escapes my memory at the moment) uses a unique ritual that differs greatly in many details from her sister U.S. Grand Lodges.
Also, District 18 in New Orleans, Louisiana is composed entirely of Scottish Rite Blue Lodges, who work the Scottish Rite version of the first three degrees. They were originally chartered by the Grand Consistory of Louisiana, but are now under jurisdiction of the state’s Grand Lodge, who has permitted them to continue using the Scottish Rite Work.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 07:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by Masonic Light

[deletia]

Also, District 18 in New Orleans, Louisiana is composed entirely of Scottish Rite Blue Lodges, who work the Scottish Rite version of the first three degrees. They were originally chartered by the Grand Consistory of Louisiana, but are now under jurisdiction of the state’s Grand Lodge, who has permitted them to continue using the Scottish Rite Work.

Fiat Lvx.


That is very cool! Thank you very much for the response. It had been my understanding that the Scottish Rite "Blue" degrees had never been exemplified in North America. I am delighted to discover that I am wrong, and hope I will be able to visit this District 18 in New Orleans someday.



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 07:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by AlexKennedy
That is very cool! Thank you very much for the response. It had been my understanding that the Scottish Rite "Blue" degrees had never been exemplified in North America. I am delighted to discover that I am wrong, and hope I will be able to visit this District 18 in New Orleans someday.


Correction: that should have read the 16th (not 18th) Masonic District of Louisiana. Here is one of the Scottish Rite Blue Lodge's websites:
home.earthlink.net...

Fiat Lvx.



posted on May, 17 2004 @ 10:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by Masonic Light

Correction: that should have read the 16th (not 18th) Masonic District of Louisiana. Here is one of the Scottish Rite Blue Lodge's websites:
home.earthlink.net...

Fiat Lvx.


I thought it was a little odd that New Orleans had 18 districts


This looks great. I must come visit someday.

BTW, I've just been watching "A Visit with General Albert Pike," which is simply amazing. I'd highly recommend it to your viewing, DTOM, if you want to see how Scottish Rite Freemasonry helps keep countries free (among so many other things). Reading Morals and Dogma alone, of course, is enough to bring tears to your eyes (it was for me, anyway); but hearing the lectures actually spoken, by someone who actually cares about them, was even more moving (I may be just emotional, but I had to stop the DVD for a while because I was so affected by Albert Pike's words).
By the way, the DVD is available from the Scottish Rite Research Society, and I believe the price is $10 American.



posted on May, 18 2004 @ 10:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by AlexKennedy
I thought it was a little odd that New Orleans had 18 districts


lol...actually, I think it has only two, and that the city comprises the 16th and part of the 17th Districts of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on May, 18 2004 @ 02:16 PM
link   


Only that the Degree in question is that of Royal Arch Mason, instead of Mark Master. The Constitution of the United Grand Lodge of England, adopted at the merger between the Antient and Modern Grand Lodges, reads as follows: “Pure Antient Masonry consists of three degrees, viz., Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason, which includes the Supreme Order of the Holy Royal Arch.”


ML, correct as usual.

The Royal Arch under UGLE is designated as the 3rd degree completed.

PZ.

[edit on 18-6-2004 by billmcelligott]



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 10:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by egotesticle
sorry if i missed the post but why would anyone want to become a mason and are there any benefits?? and how is this a "secret society?"


Speaking for myself, I became a Mason my great-grandfather was a Mason. Imagine my surprise to learn that my grandfather was a WM. My only regret was he died many years before I was raised. All lodges are different, but my first lodge was filled with some of the best men I have ever had the pleasure to know. I don't know the men in my current lodge that well, but they have always gone out of their way to make me feel welcome.

What's a benefit of becoming a Mason? What would you say to being able to go into ANY city and know that you have a friend who will help you as much as he can? What would you say to being able to meet a total stranger and you were instantly friends? I have experienced that first hand, and you cannot beat it.

Are there the famous "connections?" Maybe; none that I have seen, but I can tell you that my dentist is a Brother, and believe me I would not go to a dentist just because he was a Brother.

The benefit you get out of being a Mason is directly proportional to what you put into it. At the moment I am not getting much out of being a Mason, but then I have not been to my lodge in over two months. As in all things, you get out what you put in.

Jubeloh



new topics

top topics



 
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join