The Sun is Different!

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posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


I hadn't thought of that, but something is definetly unusual. I have a dark complextion anyway, thanks in part to my great grandmothers cherokee dna, and as I stated, this is the first time I have ever burned...




posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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I'm just now healing from blisters I got while out in the sun for a bit last week. My right arm got too much sun while we were riding around and the top side of my arm ended up blistered from the top of the hand to where my shirt sleeve ended. Never had that before.

I did have the lovely purple burn many years ago and have kept out of the sun as much as possible ever since. I know how much pain you just went through and am glad you are healing.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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Hello to my fellow Texans! I'm in the area east of Dallas.

Yeah, its freakin hot. No slow build up. Just BOOM, HOT!


Ive been wondering if it was just the humidity being a bit high. I remember about 1998 (i was installing HVAC systems then) it was a miserable summer...until that weird fluke day and it dumped to 50* one day.

It was nice, but we payed for it the next day.

Not sure if its anything weird but it seems to be a 10 year patern.

81, 98, 09. cant remember what it was like in 91.

We just lost our shade trees to a storm. Lost a 65' cottonwood tree (male thank god-no cotton)! This didnt make our 3 dogs happy in the least!

s and f



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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I haven't noticed any marked change, but I see that a few members have--that is enough to pique my interest.

Though a change in the sun's influence is a possible culprit, anyone experiencing greater photosensitivity should cover all bases. Be sure to pay particular attention to your body now--thirst and hunger levels, energy level, new sensations, skin abnormalities, etc., as this is sometimes a symptom of illness. Even some herbs taken for health can increase sensitivity.

Greenize, were you sunbathing with anyone that day (to compare your reactions to the sun)? How long had it been since you'd last lain out in the sun? If not, have you asked anyone in the area if they've experienced greater sun sensitivity?

[edit on 4/7/09 by paperplanes]



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:28 AM
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reply to post by paperplanes
 


No, I was alone. I sunbathe all the time and actually spend my lunch break at work sitting in the sun and I drive a convertible, so I am exposed to the sun all of the time. I had taken no meds or herbs. Also, there had been no chemicals put in the pool for a couple of days prior...



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:36 AM
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might have something to do with the 4 sunspots that recently apearred on the sun

Abovetopsecret.com...

the earth gets hotter with sunspots right?



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by Greenize
reply to post by paperplanes
 


No, I was alone. I sunbathe all the time and actually spend my lunch break at work sitting in the sun and I drive a convertible, so I am exposed to the sun all of the time. I had taken no meds or herbs. Also, there had been no chemicals put in the pool for a couple of days prior...


Do I understand correctly that the sunburn affected only your torso/legs? I agree with Shamus--that may be key. I see that there were no new chemicals in the pool, but did you apply anything to your legs/torso before this happened--e.g. lotion, powder, fragrance? Was your lower body exposed to more sunlight than your upper body? Perhaps your head was under shade, or clouds moved to shade part of your body--this could have happened without your notice, especially if you were relaxed. There just isn't any obvious explanation if your exposure to sunlight was even across your entire body and no products were present on the affected area.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:40 AM
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This is just a stab in the dark, but down here we're having a very wet winter.

Suppose the water molecules in the air naturally gravitate to the colder hemisphere? This would mean less water vapour in the hotter hemisphere, leading to a more direct sunlight as the light doesn't have the diffusing filter that water molecules give.

Dryer air = less water molecules = more direct UV getting thru.

Just a guess. Anything could be happening.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:41 AM
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Lucky you had Aloe Vera, I've had a SEVERE sun burn before, were I ended up with skin peeling like mad, and if I smiled you could see the temp wrinkles created by the skin peeling, it looked really funny haha. And I woke up at night with a fever and felt really dizzy and sick.

Anyway my point is Aloe Vera helped a LOT.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by paperplanes
 


I showered and shaved my legs before I went out and I may have put lotion on them, I normally do, but I do not remember. There is no shade at all around my pool...I don't know... I do remember that it was windy...



[edit on 4-7-2009 by Greenize]



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:57 AM
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Great thread, S&F.

Anyone have a spectrograph?



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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Holding pretty steady right now, but I expect an increase in solar activity also.





If the sun feels too hot on your skin? Get inside. Tanning is bad for you.

Wear sunscreen and light bright colored clothing that gives your some room.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by Greenize
 


Hmmm...so the body product angle appears to be out. The stomach and legs are more sensitive to sunlight than elsewhere on the body and are also slower to heal from a burn. That can account for a reasonable variation in sunburn colour across the body, but it cannot account for the drastic variation you present: severe, purple burn adjacent to normal skin.

To account for this variation, there must be some external cause (shadow or chemical application to the affected skin) or internal cause (an anomaly within the affected skin, perhaps). Considering your details, shade is really the only reasonable cause I can imagine, but even it is unlikely. If you were drifting in the pool, the shade would need to drift perfectly in line with your upper body, leaving your lower body exposed to more sunlight--clearly a very unlikely scenario. If you were not drifting and instead remained in one precise spot, the shade would likewise need to be from a stationary object (also, the sun presumably remained in more or less the same spot during the hour and half of exposure). Clouds would be an unlikely fit for either case. With that said, if the sun's rays were evenly distributed across your body, more powerful sunlight cannot be an explanation for your partial burn.

I assume there is nothing in your raft that would have obscured your upper body. This is a mystery. If your entire body received the same amount of sun exposure, but only the lower half burned, I can only imagine there must be something very odd going on within that region of your skin. That would be a case for Dr. House, not paperplanes
.


[edit on 4/7/09 by paperplanes]



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 01:36 AM
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reply to post by paperplanes
 


Her personal medical issue aside, she's right. The sun is different.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 01:52 AM
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Originally posted by brokenheadphonez
reply to post by paperplanes
 


Her personal medical issue aside, she's right. The sun is different.


I note a medical issue as a possibility, not as a diagnosis. A severe partial-body sunburn after full-body, even sun exposure is not a possibility without an extenuating factor. The OP does not recall any extenuating factors--the most obvious being shade or something on/in the skin, and in fact provided details which seem to rule them out.

The OP is presented as a possible reflection of a changing sun. Unless particular details of the occurrence are sorted out, it cannot be held as such. That is the issue at hand. To ignore that and go on to debating about the sun itself is to ignore the OP's presented scenario and deviate from the thread's initial post.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by paperplanes
 


Yeah you're right, it's just so hard to admit something has changed and not go in depth into the reasons why. But still, I think most of us agree that something weird is going on with regards to the sun/atmosphere



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by paperplanes
 


Ok this makes sense...I drive a convertible hence face, arms and shoulders are exposed often, I can't wear a bikini to work, so when I sit outside during the day at lunch I have on slacks. Perhaps my legs and torso weren't ready for that long of exposure...I don't know what else it could be, even though I did the same thing last year and didn't burn, and I think its true that as we age our skin thins...mind you I am only 42, but that ain't 22 now is it...



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 04:40 AM
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Originally posted by Greenize
reply to post by paperplanes
 


Ok this makes sense...I drive a convertible hence face, arms and shoulders are exposed often, I can't wear a bikini to work, so when I sit outside during the day at lunch I have on slacks. Perhaps my legs and torso weren't ready for that long of exposure...I don't know what else it could be, even though I did the same thing last year and didn't burn, and I think its true that as we age our skin thins...mind you I am only 42, but that ain't 22 now is it...


That very well may be your answer, Greenize. How is the sunburn now? I've had a few of those awful, blistering ones and I know how painful it can be. If you're still having a lot of discomfort, you might try whole milk or oatmeal baths. When I was a child, those were my grandmother's go-to treatments for relief; they're very soothing. White vinegar is another popular fix that works very well by drawing the heat out of a burn. And I haven't tried this one, but after a friend recommended it to me, I had to Google it because it sounded so strange: shaving cream. Yep--apparently, it works wonders at relieving the pain of a sunburn. The aloe you're already using is great, too. Just keep applying it as often as you can (a sunburn will heal better if you keep it moist), and you might try cold packs and ibuprofen for any swelling or really bothersome discomfort. Good luck!



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by Greenize
 


You can't wear a bikini to work? That's absurd.
You need to find other employment!



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 07:48 AM
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Since the topic came up, I think it's important to understand that sunscreen actually causes cancer. It does not prevent it - this fact is absolutely true. The sunscreen fraud/hoax has been exposed time and time again through research but have we heard anything to the contrary? Of course not. They love you rubbing that compound all over your skin. They don't want us to know that as our diet continues to take a nosedive (because of the fake food onslaught), we loose the ability for our skin to be naturally protected.

IF you can't possibly believe the above paragraph then your ego will also not permit you to believe that cancer and the methods to eliminate it from the body are completely understood and withheld from the general public (and the mainstream medical profession).

It's absolutely embarrassing how little the average doctor or specialist knows about disease and their root causes. It's almost as though we (and they) believe "disease is an unfortunate event, and when we get struck, it's some type of exterior force, like numbers being drawn in a lottery, and we have to 'make due' with this unfortunate hand we been dealt".

Pretty much the worst outlook and view possible. Friends, these diseases, all of them, are well understood. And you getting them; is how the game is played.

Source: www.naturalnews.com...

[edit on 4-7-2009 by StrangeBrew]





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