Exactly which law is it?

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posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:10 AM
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Throughout this forum and others I repeatedly see martial law spelled as marshall law. At first I thought it was simply a misspelled word but it seems more people use the "marshall" spelling than they do the "martial" spelling. Is there a reason for this? I guess I'm wondering what I am missing here, if there is something behind the spelling. I'd appreciate some feedback.




posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:12 AM
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Maybe it's just the American spelling/ British spelling of the same thing?



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:19 AM
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Paul, thanks for the response. I considered that but then I realized that some of the people who spell it "Marshall" live in the US. Still wondering...



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:21 AM
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I remember there was a show called Martial Law, but I believe they changed the spelling of the name because it was about karate and martial arts? I've also seen Marshall Law, and maybe they have it spelled like that because of a "Court Marshall". No idea really, just a few guesses. Can somebody clarify?



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:29 AM
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Hey titian...

This is the correct spelling:

MARTIAL LAW




Mr. M



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 08:31 AM
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Originally posted by StarChild
Hey titian...

This is the correct spelling:

MARTIAL LAW




Mr. M


Mr. M, thanks. That much I knew but I'm wondering if there is something behind the frequent spelling of it as "marshall".



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 09:02 AM
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I just found something interesting, which will feed into those who claim Florida entered martial law just before 9-11.

I was comparing the results for "marshall law" versus "martial law" in google. I scanned 81 returns for "marshall law". Out of those the only results for "marshall law" were for some rock band and various law schools.

Interestingly, when I started scanning the results for "martial law" I found this page: sun6.dms.state.fl.us... . What is interesting is that the word "martial" is not found anywhere on the page, not in the HTML and not in the keywords meta tag.

So how did google know to categorize this as a hit for martial law?



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 10:18 AM
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Want to bring this back up top for more feedback. I'm still wondering about the spelling variations. But now I'm interested in what I found on the state of Florida web page.



posted on May, 6 2004 @ 11:12 AM
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How about Marital law? Most men would agree being married is much like living under Martial law.

Not me of course, my wife is perfectly willing to share the decision making process



(this message approved by wife of scottsquared)



posted on May, 8 2004 @ 06:30 AM
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I believe "Marshall" is a name, and "Martial" is the thing.



posted on May, 8 2004 @ 06:45 AM
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Derived from a plan conceived by then Secretary of State George Marshall following WWII.

It originally dealt with the reconstruction and recovery of Europe.

Since Congress passed it, it became Marshall's Law....or Marshall Law.


G



posted on May, 8 2004 @ 06:50 AM
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^ Ah, so it is based off the name.

Cool.



posted on May, 10 2004 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by titian
So how did google know to categorize this as a hit for martial law?


I'm afraid Google doesn't take any blame for this one, I don't think. You can make search keywords in a META tag (don't quote me on this I'm no expert, just self-taught), so if the keyword "martial" is in there then that would explain it methinks



posted on May, 10 2004 @ 05:52 PM
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There are two different "laws"....

The MARSHALL PLAN was a plan (not a law) to help reorganize Europe after WWII.

MARTIAL law is a law that says if the local government should not be able to operate for any reason (tornado stomped city hall flat or something or there's a disaster too big for the local police force to handle (like 9/11) ) then the Federal government can take control temporarily.

The confusion is due to the words sounding the same and people confusing their history lesson with what they hear. Bad spelling has long added to the confusion.



posted on May, 11 2004 @ 03:18 PM
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Martial was originally an adjective, meaning "of Mars," i.e. war-like in appearance or action. This would be the law enforced during wartime emergencies.

Marshall was originally french: "Marechall" the king's head-groom; the fellow that kept all the king's horses. Eventually, the marshall became responsible for making sure that all military units under the king were ready for battle.

As the king's man, the "Marshall" was distinct from the "Sheriff," the people's elected peace officer in the Shire.

To this day, in the U.S. Marshalls are appointed, while sheriffs are elected.

There is no legal term "marshall law." It was the name of a TV show.



posted on May, 11 2004 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by titian
I'm wondering if there is something behind the frequent spelling of it as "marshall".

Yes there is. It's called ignorance.



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