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Object near the Sun, seems to be heading toward the Sun

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posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by AntManBee
reply to post by downtown436
 


I believe it is generating its own light mainly because of the lack of a shadow in any of the photographs. If this were an asteroid or planet, there would be a clear shadow on the right side of the object. The brightest portion of the object should be on the left side (facing the sun). Instead, the brightest section seems to be generally in the center, as would be expected if the object were generating its own light.


newsflash dr. einstein, its mercury, and its BEHIND the sun. The sunlight is hitting it almost in a full frontal manner, as depicted in this photo:

stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

("B" is the spacecraft taking the pictures of it, and by it, I mean mercury).

[edit on 1-7-2009 by The Dispatcherator]




posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by AntManBee
 


Dang, good point!

I really haven't ever looked at enough of these type of images to know that.

That is scary as hell though, because if it is emitting light, that means that it is a star or something, burning.

It looks pretty large too.

So, we have a light emitting cosmic body, at least the size of Mercury, maybe as big as Jupiter, in the inner solar system, either orbiting, or on a collision course with the Sun.

Crap, this is starting to sort of worry me.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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well while we are all looking at the sun
here is the latest stereo movie image from the nasa stereo site

it is the ahead view
move the cursor to 2.37: 54

what the f... is that

I dont know,it may be a normal occurrence to see two massive things like that and then they go.

have a look, you will see what i mean..



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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Maybe this could be an explaination




A bright comet was observed plungin toward the Sun, overheating, and disintegrating by the STEREO (Ahead) COR2 coronagraph (May 22-24, 2008) over about a 36-hour period. The comet was a member of the Kreutz sungrazer family, named after a 19th century German astronomer who studied them in detail. Kreutz sungrazers are fragments from the breakup of a giant comet at least 2000 years ago. Many of these fragments pass by the Sun and disintegrate. Most are too small to see, but occasionally a big comet like this one comes by. (The Sun is represented by the white circle and the black disk is the occulting disk used to block out the immediate area around the Sun so we can see fainter structures in the surrounding corona.)


see the image here



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by The Dispatcherator
 


Ahh I see what you are saying.

That also explains why it appears so big, I guess.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by downtown436
reply to post by T0by
 


I think it has been determined that the object in question is much to big to be Mercury.

I could be wrong, but I think it is based on some of the other Mercury transit pics I have seen.


It does seem to be bigger than mercury, but my main question is -
Is it really as big as the picture portrays or is it just a camera pixelation type of effect.

These sun pictures always seem to add a glow to anything and everything, making them appear larger than they actually are.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by The Dispatcherator

Originally posted by AntManBee
reply to post by downtown436
 


I believe it is generating its own light mainly because of the lack of a shadow in any of the photographs. If this were an asteroid or planet, there would be a clear shadow on the right side of the object. The brightest portion of the object should be on the left side (facing the sun). Instead, the brightest section seems to be generally in the center, as would be expected if the object were generating its own light.


newsflash dr. einstein, its mercury, and its BEHIND the sun. The sunlight is hitting it almost in a full frontal manner, as depicted in this photo:

stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

("B" is the spacecraft taking the pictures of it, and by it, I mean mercury).

[edit on 1-7-2009 by The Dispatcherator]


yeah...... like that.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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Originally posted by The Dispatcherator

Originally posted by AntManBee
reply to post by downtown436
 


I believe it is generating its own light mainly because of the lack of a shadow in any of the photographs. If this were an asteroid or planet, there would be a clear shadow on the right side of the object. The brightest portion of the object should be on the left side (facing the sun). Instead, the brightest section seems to be generally in the center, as would be expected if the object were generating its own light.


newsflash dr. einstein, its mercury, and its BEHIND the sun. The sunlight is hitting it almost in a full frontal manner, as depicted in this photo:

stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

("B" is the spacecraft taking the pictures of it, and by it, I mean mercury).

[edit on 1-7-2009 by The Dispatcherator]

Man, that was slightly belittling, don't you think?

Ok, lets assume it's Mercury, BEHIND the sun as you so sympathetically pointed out...why does it appear so much larger than previous pictures of Mercury in transit? If it were in fact moving behind the sun, would it not appear even SMALLER than images of it in front of the sun? Further away usually means it looks smaller right?

Please don't beat us up for not being as smart.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by T0by
 


Yeah I'm starting to think that dispacherator is right because of where Mercury is compared to the B Stereo Sat.

For some reason I was confused ant thinking that the "B" sat was on the right side of the diagram, putting Mercury in front of the Sun.

B is in fact on the left of the diagram, putting Mercury behind the Sun, and so we are seeing the face of Mercury that is bright, causing it so show up, emitting light, and thus making it seem to be about ~25x bigger than it really is.

Okay, I pretty sure we are just about to the point of calling the Object in question Mercury.

I'll bump it up to about 93% certainty that it is in fact Mercury.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by KSPigpen

Originally posted by The Dispatcherator

Originally posted by AntManBee
reply to post by downtown436
 


I believe it is generating its own light mainly because of the lack of a shadow in any of the photographs. If this were an asteroid or planet, there would be a clear shadow on the right side of the object. The brightest portion of the object should be on the left side (facing the sun). Instead, the brightest section seems to be generally in the center, as would be expected if the object were generating its own light.


newsflash dr. einstein, its mercury, and its BEHIND the sun. The sunlight is hitting it almost in a full frontal manner, as depicted in this photo:

stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

("B" is the spacecraft taking the pictures of it, and by it, I mean mercury).

[edit on 1-7-2009 by The Dispatcherator]

Man, that was slightly belittling, don't you think?

Ok, lets assume it's Mercury, BEHIND the sun as you so sympathetically pointed out...why does it appear so much larger than previous pictures of Mercury in transit? If it were in fact moving behind the sun, would it not appear even SMALLER than images of it in front of the sun? Further away usually means it looks smaller right?

Please don't beat us up for not being as smart.




Side by side comparisons of soho mercury images and these new ones would be great. I think it would probably settle this.

I'd do it myself but i'm at work right now, I have to type quickly and discreetly.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by KSPigpen
 


Ive never seen any other pics from Stereo showing a mercury transit, so I have nothing to compare them to. Show me some, making sure the date is included on the pic, and I'll let you know.


But, yeah, its definitely Mercury. And if it wasn't Mercury (even thought it *is* mercury), the MUCH more important question would be WHERE THE F**K is MERCURY?!!?!?!?!?

lol, pz.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by The Dispatcherator

Originally posted by AntManBee
reply to post by downtown436
 


newsflash dr. einstein, its mercury, and its BEHIND the sun. The sunlight is hitting it almost in a full frontal manner, as depicted in this photo:

stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

("B" is the spacecraft taking the pictures of it, and by it, I mean mercury).

[edit on 1-7-2009 by The Dispatcherator]


Ow...my feelings...
Anyway, the diameter of Mercury is 3032 miles. The diameter of the sun is 865,000 miles, so the diameter of Mercury is 0.35% the diameter of the sun. In photos of Mercury passing in front of the sun, it appears as a barely discernable dot. Now put Mercury behind the sun and add approximately 36,000,000 miles for its average orbit and it should look a bit smaller than that. Why does it look like a giant glowing blob?



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by 2theC
well while we are all looking at the sun
here is the latest stereo movie image from the nasa stereo site

it is the ahead view
move the cursor to 2.37: 54

what the f... is that

I dont know,it may be a normal occurrence to see two massive things like that and then they go.

have a look, you will see what i mean..



ok I'll show you!!




posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:40 PM
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Original Mathematical calculations contained an obvious flaw in the primary stages of my work...

The conclusions drawn in THIS POST were in ERROR, by a large factor.

I have corrected the math, and resubmitted my findings,

I think you will enjoy it.

-Edrick

[edit on 1-7-2009 by Edrick]

[edit on 1-7-2009 by Edrick]



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by Edrick
 


Math is not my strong point...thanks for taking the time to do this. I think it makes more sense than Mercury. I've been following this thread all day, scratching my head...but I think you nailed it. Good job.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by 2theC
 


Well, i won't even hazard a guess as to what that is my friend.

Okay, one guess. Santa Claus is the giant glowing planetoid on the left, and Michael Jacksons Soul ship is the one on the right.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by downtown436
 


and they are only on that frame
not the one before 2:23:20
and not the one after 2:53:20
and they are HUGE!!



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:54 PM
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No, Im sorry... my original calculations were in error.

Please review my correction:

Ok, some quick trig...


-Definitions and Variables-
The Diameter of the sun: 1,392,000 KM

Earth Orbit:
Aphelion: 152,097,701 km
Perihelion: 147,098,074 km
Mean: (152,097,701 + 147,098,074) / 2 = 149,597,888

The Diameter of Mercury: 4,879 KM
Mean distance of Mercury from sun
aphelion: 69,816,900 km
Perihelion: 46,001,200 km
Mean: (69,816,900 + 46,001,200) / 2 = 57,909,050

The Diameter of Venus: 12,103 KM
Mean distance of Venus from sun
Aphelion: 108,942,109 km
perihelion: 107,476,259 km
Mean: (108,942,109 + 107,476,259) / 2 = 108,209,184

-End definitions-

Ok, first off, we need to determine the distances from the earth of the Three objects in our calculation:


Sun = 149,597,888 KM

Mercury = 149,597,888 KM - 57,909,050 KM = 91,688,838 KM

Venus = 149,597,888 - 108,209,184 KM = 41,388,704 KM


So, now we need the total circumference of a circle of the radius of each distance from the earth.

Pi*r2

Sun = (149,597,888 * 2) * pi = 939,951,252 KM




Mercury = (91,688,838 * 2) * pi = 576,097,960 KM




Venus = pi * (41,388,704 * 2) * pi = 260,052,897 KM





OK, now we need to determine the approximate angle that each body takes up in the night sky.

(Diameter of each body / Circumference of its circle from earth)

Sun = 1,392,000 / 939,951,252 = 0.00148092786

Mercury = 4,879 / 576,097,960 = 0.00000846904579

Venus = 12,103 / 260,052,897 = 0.0000465405313


Ok, now we need to convert that into an angle, using the Cotangent Function:

Tan^-1(Above number)

Sun = 0.084850854 deg

Venus = 0.00266657602 deg

Mercury = 0.00048524058 deg



Ok, that was exhausting...


Lets see... lets take this picture:

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

The picture is 1024 pixels wide, by 1024 pixels high.

Sun = 210 pixels wide

Object = 21 pixels wide


From this, we can conclude...


if Sun(Sun = 0.084850854 deg) = 210 pixles

Then 1 pixel = (0.000404052 Deg)



Just to sum up...

0.000404052 is one pixel
0.00266657602 is Venus
0.00048524058 is Mercury


So, by this calculation, at their closest orbits (Which the object appears to be at or near)

Venus would be approximately 6.5 pixels on the screen. (At maximum)
And Mercury would be approximately 1 pixel on the screen. (At maximum)


Since the object on the screen is approximately 21 pixels wide, we can conceivably estimate that the object is neither Venus, Nor mercury.

But something either Much closer, Much larger, or some combination of the two.


-Edrick



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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Originally posted by die_another_day
that object is too big to be mercury.


I agree with you, and was one of the first to bring up this fact in the "Jellyfish" thread.

There was one photo from today (20:37) that I believe showed venus AND mercury, as well as this "new" object:



and here is a link to a bigger/higher-rez version of that same pic:

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...


Now there aren't a lot of solid bodies/objects that are really large enough to reflect light and be visible, between us and the sun....only two that I know of...

I believe that this new Large planetoid is Nibiru...but I am not an expert.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by Edrick
 


I liked your other answer better. :-/
Anyway...good job!



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