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Object near the Sun, seems to be heading toward the Sun

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posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 04:53 AM
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You are really-really funny, my friend...Would you just leave this topic?

Otherwise, we don't have pictures for 10 hours now, so if it was something about to crash, it crashed. What is interesting for me is that, i've read that this object were going to crash at 4-5 AM. The sunspot, as you could see on the big picture previously, appeared at 4:48AM(the most of it). So, I'm waiting for the pictures/videos!




posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 05:22 AM
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reply to post by Mrathin
 


Me too.....waiting to see if it was indeed Mercury, what comes out the other side!
But if it was, when are we supposed to see it re-emerge?.......according to how fast it went in it should be reappearing within 24hrs. If it does not that will prove it was not Mercury...........hey ho not long to find out.

What does disturb me is the apparent disappearance of any new image since last night on the 03/July at 23:38 UTC/GMT........Is there anything to read into this, or are they celebrating the 04th......But again why would other images be available

take care,



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by light_sound
 


Sketchy satellites eh? At such an important time?
:S



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by War Otter
 


that is just an outline done by nasa to illustrate where the sun is, the rest of the outer is the suns corona.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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the pictures of the sun today - look very ODD!! Also - what is VERY interesting is the little videos of the sun - ARE OFF LINE!! We can not follow that object anymore!!

Picture of where the video of the behind sun on stereo this site here: stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Pic of where vid is suppose to be::



Please go to the link look at yesterday's mpeg of behind - something started happening with the sun just as the object got close to it:

Look at the pic of the sun right now: looks very interesting



here is another pic of the sun right now



Yesterdays' vid pic of object




posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


Strange indeed.........I would luv to know why this data is no longer available.
Is there anyone out there............and I am specifically talking to the folk who believe it is/was Mercury; that can explain the lack of info since last night.

When info is taken away, hidden or not supplied it is usually either due to a Malfunction, they are HIDDING something Or even something has been discovered that does not correlate...........take your pick.

take care,



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:38 AM
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Everything points to a cover up.

But why?

As someone who has paid a fair amount of tax dollars to set up these systems in the first place, I get frustrated when we're denied access to them.

But hey, big brother knows best...



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by light_sound
 


Ok, here is a possible explanation. Obviously we have sent a ton of traffic to that site from all our link posting. Now, I own several websites and anytime my traffic takes a sudden rise, I go inspect. It's always from some link posting to my site from a forum somewhere. So what do I do? I go to those forums to read what they are talking about and see why they are all posting links to my site.

So, from that perspective, lets say they noticed the traffic increase, saw where all the incoming traffic was coming from (this thread), and decided to check it out. Now, if nothing out of the ordinary is happening, then they are reading this thread and having a serious laugh at us right now. So to make things even more entertaining for themselves, they remove the pics from today knowing people are going to flip out, and sit back and enjoy reading us all having a freak out fest.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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That's almost 12 hours of the "flatline". So STEREO, SOHO, and ACE data (not to mention the Earth facing satellites) that are glitching.

Readings so perfect like that are impossible. Glitch my ass. Those sensors are simply not working.




posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:48 AM
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HolyCrap!
A little something going inside/behind the sun!



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:50 AM
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The object (Mercury) did show up on the pics from COR1 on the 'BEHIND' Satellite over the last 10 hours, and just now disappeared behind the sun as it makes it's transit:













Don't know why we are no longer receiving COR2 pic's, but it might have something to do with the influx in Solar X- ray's over the last 10 hours:




posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 09:50 AM
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reply to post by Mrathin
 


It looks like a comet or asteroid that was sucked in by the Sun's gravity.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 10:02 AM
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Originally posted by brokenheadphonez



I don't know where you are pulling that info from, but if you really are interested, nothing has "flatlined", here is current data:








posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by Paroxysm
 


Thanks.. The RTMS simulation is based off of ACE data.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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does anybody know of any other sources where we can look at the satellite pictures of the sun?



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by GezinhoKiko
 


stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

but don't expect to see the video - nasa took that down today - funny - just when that object was getting close to the sun!! Boy - they saw people were watching it - and are hidding it now - question did it crash into the sun?

Some ODD pictures of the sun today too.



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by GezinhoKiko
 


There's always the SOHO images.

sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by Paroxysm
 


Your object Via Cor1 does not correlate with the pictures from Cor2

The objects in these pics were taken at 21:08 & 23:38 on the 03rd of July.

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Your Pictures of Cor2 taken today 04th July shows the object much further out.

Is this the same object if so, Care to Explain the Anomaly,

take care,



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by light_sound
 

COR1 images the inner corona. COR2 images the outer corona. COR1 has a much narrower field of view than COR2. COR1 is "zoomed in"

COR1 = 1.3 to 4 solar radii
COR2 = 2 to 15 solar radii

Here's the movie.
stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Jul, 4 2009 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by light_sound
 


I think the COR2 imager may be undergoing a "bakeout". A periodic process done when the image gets "dirty" (as it seems to have done)


This is a description of the process for SOHO

In order to (i) keep read noise down (suppress the "snow") and (ii) prevent cosmic ray hits from permanently raising the read noise level by damaging the detector, the EIT CCD is usually operated at a temperature of about -67 C. This temperature is achieved by passive cooling: the CCD chip is thermally contacted to a titanium "cold finger" (at far left in the image above) that is attached to a radiator plate that is pointed at a piece of sky perpendicular to the earth-Sun line. Unfortunately, there's a small amount of "slush," probably a mixture of water vapor and hydrocarbons, that avoided the initial bakeout (just after launch) of the instrument. The back end of the EIT telescope, unfortunately, is a difficult place from which to escape, because of the plate holding the final, thin aluminum filter just in front of the CCD, and a labyrinthine venting system (designed to prevent stray light). At -67 C, even with the low partial pressure in space, the slush condenses on the CCD and the cold finger --- they're the coldest parts of the back end of the instrument. The slush absorbs some EUV, and so reduces the thoughput of the instrument. In addition, overexposure to EUV (say, from bright flares or --- before the onboard software was fixed to prevent this --- accidentally long exposures) can produce electron traps in the CCD material, which reduce the detector's throughput (how many electrons it produces for a given number of photons striking a pixel). Thus, we need to warm up --- "bake out" --- the detector to evaporate the slush (if only temporarily) and anneal out the traps in order to maintain the performance of the instrument.
umbra.nascom.nasa.gov...



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