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Rarest rock discovered from India

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posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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Rarest rock discovered from India


story.newzealandstar.com

German geologists Thursday said they have discovered in India one of the world's rarest rocks, dating back to the birth of the planet when the Earth was covered with a hot ocean of melted stone.

The fragment from the primeval crust is only the second ever discovered, said scientists at the University of Muenster.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.earthtimes.org
www.prokerala.com




posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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Only the second piece ever discovered. Wow, I'll bet this piece-o-rock is worth millions. Two pieces found, one in India, one in Canada, there must be some pieces left somewhere in between? I've been looking for a picture of this ancient rock all over the net and can't find any. Maybe somebody else out there has come up with one and can post. I sure would be interested to see what this rare rock looks like.

story.newzealandstar.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 07:32 PM
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Forgive if already posted...didn't see it.



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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don't let the twinkie company hear about this! they're gonna be so jealous. preservations lasting billions instead of millions. i bet they're up to something already.



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:33 PM
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just adding


The upper part of the mantle is composed mostly of peridotite. A peridotite is a dense, coarse-grained igneous rock, consisting mostly of the minerals olivine and pyroxene. Peridotite is ultramafic and ultrabasic, as the rock contains less than 45% silica....
, a rock denser than rocks common in the overlying crust. The boundary between the crust and mantle is conventionally placed at the Mohorovicic discontinuity

www.absoluteastronomy.com...(geology)






[edit on 25-6-2009 by warrenb]



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:33 PM
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That's nothing.
I have a fruitcake that's older than that.



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:33 PM
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Perhaps this is the same thing:
www.physorg.com...



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by cancerian42
 





Perhaps this is the same thing: www.physorg.com......


That is the second of the two known pieces....the first one found.
At least there's a photograph of that one...Thanks.





[edit on 25-6-2009 by Oatmeal]



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 08:55 PM
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the rock may be rare but i seriously doubt their assumptions of it's age and it's origins

i just dont put much faith into their "assumptions" or "pseudo-facts" anymore

don't blame me though, it was their fault for talking up their finds to increase funding, etc



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
the rock may be rare but i seriously doubt their assumptions of it's age and it's origins

i just dont put much faith into their "assumptions" or "pseudo-facts" anymore

don't blame me though, it was their fault for talking up their finds to increase funding, etc


Why?

I find it eminently plausible.

It's an interesting find. I don't think they will find much in between the two discoveries however, given the nature of plate tectonics.

It's lovely though. Everything gets recycled in the end



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 01:44 AM
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wait
no pictures?
superb job done here.



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