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A Deal To Save Iran?

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posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 04:15 PM
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A Deal To Save Iran?


www.thedailybeast.com

Reliable sources in Iran are suggesting that a possible compromise to put an end to the violent uprising that has rocked Iran for the past two weeks may be in the works. I have previously reported that the second most powerful man in Iran, Ayatollah Hashemi Rafsanjani, the head of the Assembly of Experts (the body with the power to choose and dismiss the Supreme Leader) is in the city of Qom—the country’s religious center—trying to rally enough votes from his fellow Assembly members to remove the current Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei from power
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 04:15 PM
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Rafsanjani is the Ayatollah most sympathetic to the protesters in Iran, and because of his power may really be able to work out a deal whereby there can be a run-off election between Ahmadinejad and Mousavi. If this could happen before the U.N. is called upon to intervene, it would be a most desirable outcome for everyone involved, as the U.N. is basically powerless in a situation like this and can only exert a kind of moral influence.

Of course, a second election could also be rigged so the outcome could still remain in doubt.

Ideally Mousavi would win and there would be a peaceful regime change in Iran; but short of that this compromise seems promising, even though the clerics would remain the supreme power and still rule the country.

www.thedailybeast.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 25 2009 @ 05:46 PM
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Are there any other sources for this? If it is indeed true, it'll be good news. We'll simply have to wait and see what happens.



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 12:53 AM
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There is an article in today's Iran Election News - Tehran Bureau (tehranbureau.com) -- a news outlet staffed by Iranian dissidents -- entitled "The Assembly of Experts."

Toward the end of the article it reports the travel of Rafsanjani to the religious city of Qom to enlist the support of the majority of those Assembly of Experts clerics who oppose Mesbah Yazdi and Khamenei.

The link is:
tehranbureau.com

[edit on 26-6-2009 by Sestias]



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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Flagged, I hope this is true, but what will happen if the results turn out similar to the first election? They need to do something if they want to save themselves, they may stop an revolution currently, but that doesn't rule one out in the near future (if they don't do something about it).

I figured they would have thrown Ahaminejad under the bus well before they give up the real power.



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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Originally posted by yellowcard

I figured they would have thrown Ahaminejad under the bus well before they give up the real power.


I agree with you. If the Ayatollahs remain in power, even if Mousavi eventually becomes president, there probably will be only limited change in Iranian society. It will still be a theocracy.

It may be that the Iranian people will be satisfied with that. It seems like the revolution may have greater aspirations, though.

We will have to wait and see.



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 03:16 AM
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Sorry for getting a little off topic, but I keep seeing this overwhelming sentiment towards Ahmadinejad and I don't understand it? I have yet to read anything other than things like this;


Originally posted by Sestias
Ideally Mousavi would win and there would be a peaceful regime change in Iran




Originally posted by yellowcard
Flagged, I hope this is true, but what will happen if the results turn out similar to the first election? They need to do something if they want to save themselves

I figured they would have thrown Ahaminejad under the bus well before they give up the real power.


What is driving this opinion? What makes Mousavi a better choice? Why do people in the west feel they know, so definitively, what Iranians want, or need?

I'm no expert on the intricacies of Iranian theology, but I don't see where you guys are coming from. This is simply the status quo. The popular opinion.

Can someone give me some evidence supporting this? Something legitimate other than Iran's economy? Please, enlighten me!



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 


Hit that nail on the head.

The thing that really makes me scratch my head is that, as I understand it, Mousavi is popular with the collage students and business men (in other words, the privileged minority) while Ahaminejad is wildly popular amongst the poor.

Seeing as there's more poor in Iran than rich (just like almost every other nation), that gives a fairly reasonable amount of credit towards Ahaminejad having won without fraud.

This idea that Mousavi would "end the regime" is pure fantasy. He's more open to western style economics (and all corruption and greed that comes with it), but he's still a hard line conservative Islamic leader.

People have some very screwed up notations as to what's going on over there and are jumping to some very strange conclusions.



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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whilst firmly in the left camp and a reformist - he is also not tolerant of dissendants:

news.bbc.co.uk...

BUT he is more liberal than the incumbant - and also has the support of some powerful people - including but not limited to Khatami and Rafsanjani

its very obvious there is a serious division within the higher archy on iran , and i feel its the calm before the storm.


and i hope the USA can keep the lead on its dog of war - israel.



posted on Jun, 26 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 


You're right in that we don't know that much about Mousavi, so backing him could be a gamble. He could turn out to be as repressive as Ahmadinejad for all we in the west know.

My tentative support is primarily based on the news sites, blogs, social media interactions, etc. of the dissenters. Yes, they do appear to be mostly educated people and their communications are often quite literate. But if you look at the size of the crowds of protesters you realize there are probably many average citizens participating too. Also, the fledgling feminist movement in that country is behind him.

In terms of international politics, Ahmadinejad is probably the most likely leader in the middle east to nuke Israel and start World War III, so there are a lot of nations that would like to see him out of power. He also hates the west. Almost anyone would probably be better.

I was not aware that the poor people of Iran loved Ahmadinejad; that is something to be considered. It may be the Iranian people really want to live in a theocracy that is governed with an iron hand.

But from the size and passion of the protesters, it looks like many Iranians want change. Just as we Americans voted for Obama because of our hope that he would change things.

We in the west can only stand on the sidelines and cheer. If we are wrong about Mousavi then it is my conviction that the Iranian people will not allow him to become president. The power is ultimately with the people of Iran.



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