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State by State Map of Unemployment, Foreclosures, and Budget Deficits

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posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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Where does your state rank?

This is by far the best graphical map, concerning our economic situation, to surface to date. Though personally I feel that the situation is far worse than most people realize, this is a start in getting out the numbers. I do feel that these numbers are sugar coated in an attempt to make the economy look better than what it truely is.

Even going off of these numbers, we are in some serious trouble. This fall will be bad. The economy is not getting better. Banks are failing again. Life will get real interesting in the next few years.




posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


Perfect! Thanks for the link. I don't live there so I don't have a state but I'd tell you if I did.

Star and flag!



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


I find the graph and numbers to be unbalanced and the reason being that the populations in each state are different. The states in trouble are also the ones with the most people. The ones fairing better have less concentrations of people.

They should have a chart adjusted for population density which would show that the problems are even worse than believed.

good find



[edit on 24-6-2009 by warrenb]



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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My State of FL is in really bad shape. There are so many people out of work and out of their homes we have a growing camping (homeless) population. The police chase them off when they find them so they move around a lot but they are here out in the bush. It is rough down here in South FL for sure. It is either hot as h3ll or raining like h3ll right now one or the other. If you are stuck outside in this mess you are really suffering.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by warrenb
 


I couldn't agree more. Seems to me aswell that the numbers are quite sugar coated. They are not truely indicitive of the situation. They are using "Bush era" fuzzy mathmatics.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 01:04 PM
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Great post, awesome, thanks!

Does anyone know where to get a current state by state map of each states debt? I hear only 2 states are not in the red, and my state, Illinois, is over 112 billion in the red.

I tried looking but unable to find a map graphic, and in many cases, unreliable sources of the current debt for many states. Anyone know of a good chart?



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by OneNationUnder
 


I am looking but have had no luck. I can find some individual state debt figures but have not found a complete map. I'll keep looking and will update the thread if I find one.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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Oklahoma is on the low end of everything, which isn't surprising. I agree with a previous poster that population should be figured into the equation. We've been feeling a pinch for a while now but not the big squeeze like so many other states.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by soldiermom
 


Oklahoma is at the low end of the scale not mainly because of the population (which is small), but mainly due to it having it's own "micro-economy". Due to the "Oil Field" Oklahoma has been lucky in having an industry of both oil and natural gas (mostly natural gas) to keep it above most states.

As a buisness owner myself, I am begining to see the downward trend in the states economy now. I am currently doing fine fiscally but my income has definatly decreased. Alot of my customers were "Oil Field" workers whom now have been seeing massive layoffs.

This fall is going to show us how this economy really is. I think it is much uglier than anyone can imagine.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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2000 U.S. population density within each county, in persons per sq. mile




2000 U.S. population density within each county, in persons per sq. mile (lower 48 states only): Light to dark (yellow to blue): 1-4 (y), 5-9 (lt. green), 10-24 (teal), 25-49 (dk. teal), 50-99 (blue-green), 100-249 (blue), 250-66,995 (black).

en.wikipedia.org...

this should give us all some "pause" for thought.

compare the blue areas (population density) with the OP post and it gets frightening.



*edit to add source link


[edit on 24-6-2009 by warrenb]



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by warrenb
 


I think personally that what this goes to show is how the larger the population in a given area, the few taxes people pay due to their ability to depend on government assisted programs. It also shows in my eyes where the highest amount of government corruption is.

In theory the higher the population the more revenue the state will bring in. Either they are bringing in more revenue and letting the corrupt politicians line their own pockets or they people are sapping the system dry with welfare claims that are unsubstantiated or based off of lazyness.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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That map is wrong.

Texas does not have a deficit. It can't go into the red, by law, unless each line item to go into red is passed by 4/5 of congress.

So the map is a bit flawed with that.

Never mind the fact that TX does have a Rainy Day fund of ~9 billion that has not been tapped yet..



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by xxpigxx
 


links to sources to back that up plz?



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


We do have lots of natural gas. We signed a lease with a drilling company 2 years ago that runs out in November. Unfortunately, we had no gas on our property. It was all to the west of us and they put in quite a few pumps. I guess that would be Oklahoma's one saving grace.

I hope you're outlook on the fall is wrong but I'm not going to hold my breath.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by xxpigxx
 


You do understand that a deficit is a future balance sheet that is accounting for all incomes of the state. These deficits grow larger as unemployment claims go up and more people turn to welfare. As companies begin to fold and no longer contribute to the states tax revenues the deficit grows to. These deficits are based on money going out due to state programs and agencies. They do go red in economic times like this.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


And by law, those programs will be cut, or money will be taken from the rainy day fund.

Like I said, Texas is not allowed to go into red.

Edit to add:

Link

That is a link to the budget. It is not in deficit, but it could be by 2011 when the new budgets are voted on. If that is the case, stuff will be cut. Plain and simple.

[edit on 24/6/2009 by xxpigxx]



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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These deficits can happen overnight and pile up faster than the state can respond. How do you know the rainy day fund is still there? It could be like the social security fund.... You are trusting the polititians to tell you how the system will work instead of looking at the dead truth numbers from what the state itself reported.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by warrenb
reply to post by xxpigxx
 


links to sources to back that up plz?



--The Texas Constitution requires that the Legislature budget for no more than the amount of revenue that the Comptroller certifies will be available. The requirement that Texas must balance its budgets is a major difference between state and federal budgeting, for Texas cannot run a deficit, while the national government clearly can (Its at 10 trillion). The fact that Texas must only spend what is available presses the legislature to FIRST spend it's money on federally mandated programs (like Medicare) and constitutionally required systems (like Education).--

Any running deficits are taken from the Rainy Day Fund:

--States use rainy day funds(RDFs) as a cushion against financial shocks. Every state except Vermont has some sort of balanced budget requirement so that, unlike the federal government, they must balance expenditures and revenues in any given budget cycle. States can have RDFs that allow money to be carried over from good years to lean years. In Texas, voters created the Rainy Day Fund in 1988, requiring that deposits be made: 1.) When unencumbered revenue remains after a legislative biennium, and 2.) When, oil and gas production taxes collected exceed those collected in 1987. This fund is important so as to protect the state from suffering when times are bad. Keeping Rainy Day Funds is much like ensuring that you have enough money in your savings account. RDF funds have recently been used to cover un-anticipated expenses like Medicare shortfalls and increased costs of the Children's Health Insurance Program, commonly referred to as CHIP.
Link

[edit on 24/6/2009 by xxpigxx]



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 04:21 PM
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And just for good measure:


National data consistently demonstrates that Texas is at or near the bottom of the 50 states in spending when its economy and population are taken into place. Per capita, Texas ranked 50th in state government spending and 49th in state taxes in 2006



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


Because in Texas, we actually require everything to be transparent.

That is part of why we are not in the mess that most of the states are in, which speaks well considering our population, our average income, and the land area we cover.




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