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The MASON Checkered Black & White Floor... What does it mean?

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posted on Jul, 19 2013 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by excelents
 

LOL...nice

I wrote something on the Beauceant which is a standard composed of two sections (black and white): www.travelingtemplar.com...

reply to post by Unity_99
 

Who are these "dark hats"?




posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by Doomsday 2029
 


checkered floor mean everytime you passing checkered floor is like you passing thrugh other dimension you have to look up but down to see



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by KSigMason
 

write truth what checkered floor really means, or i'll explain



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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The MASON Checkered Black & White Floor... What does it mean?

...a very lazy sense of interior design principles...

Å99



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 12:23 PM
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The checkered floor is emblematic of life, checkered with good and evil.

Or it can be emblematic of a chess board of the owner was a chess player.

Or it can be a dramatic visual display used in contemporary design.

Symbols are not universal. Think dynamic.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 03:54 PM
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solarm
reply to post by KSigMason
 

write truth what checkered floor really means, or i'll explain


He did "write truth" . But if you believe KSig is lying then by all means enlighten us on what the checkered pavement really means (in your mind) . Because if it is anything like what you have already posted concerning your vast knowledge of Freemasonry then we are in for a treat .



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by solarm
 

I have, but if you believe differently then please, by all means post your "truth".

reply to post by akushla99
 

lol
edit on 15-11-2013 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 02:56 AM
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They're construction workers! It's so they can get drunk and not lose their balance...

Masons' totally can't hold their own at frat parties.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 03:28 AM
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reply to post by KSigMason
 


EXACTLY



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 03:40 AM
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KSigMason
reply to post by thelonious2
 

Actually you are misrepresenting and taking it out of context. You must read the entire chapter to see what Pike was talking about. Pike is essentially saying those who deserve to be misled will be misled...often by their own bigotry and ignorance.

EXACTLY



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 06:20 AM
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senrak

"The Mosaic Pavement is a representation of the ground floor of King Solomon's temple, and is emblematical of human life, checkered with good and evil.

As the steps of men are trod in the various and uncertain incidents of life, our days are variegated and checkered by a strange contrariety of events, and our passage through this existence, though sometimes attended by prosperous circumstances, is often beset by a multitude of evils, therefore is the Lodge furnished with Mosaic work, to remind us of the precariousness of our state on earth. Today our feet tread in prosperity; tomorrow we may totter on the uneven paths of weakness, temptation and adversity.

While this emblem is before us we are instructed to boast of nothing; to have compassion and to give aid to those who are in adversity; to walk uprightly and with humility; for such is this existence, that there is no station in which pride can be stably founded; all men, in birth and in the grave, are on a level.

While we tread on this Mosaic work, let our ideas return to the original, whence we copy, and let our every act be as the dictates of reason prompt us, to live in brotherly love."

(Source: The Kentucky Monitor; Grand Lodge of Kentucky, F&AM)

It's just a symbol. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.


Symbols serve as a concise representation of a concept, which after being understood, can be conveyed instantly in its entirety in a manner words and explanation cannot. Well chosen symbols pass beyond the initial revelation. This is a well chosen symbol. The full lesson of the checked floor does not stop with the removal of the first veil as explained. The second veil is gradually removed as one applies the lesson of the symbol in a purposeful way. Only when one reaches a state of awareness that they apply the lesson of the symbol intuitively and continuously does one approach the intended knowledge. Only then can one understand the true beauty and meaning of such a symbol. This symbol of the checked floor is not just another simple symbol.

This is more a comment on the use of well chosen symbols and eventually using more abstract symbols or glyphs for concepts. If one works with symbols as concepts routinely what I'm saying may be easy to comprehend, but many do not have this type of experience. An analgoue is available in the word "tree." Saying the word "tree" coveys many things simultaneously associated with "treeness" and "non treeness." I'm not familiar with masonic tradition -- but it is obvious upon minor reflection the checked floor represents far more than just the words above. Those words hint at the meanings which cannot be easily expressed in words but can be experienced and incorporated.

One seemingly universal truth, which perhaps applies to the wider discussion, is that the equivalent of "degrees" is granted on proof of acquisition of specific knowledge/lore. True mastery however comes from the living application of the knowledge conveyed by the symbols. One could clearly see different levels of development beyond the specific knowledge in the responses and lack of feeling a need to respond. I am left with assuming that achieving the 32nd degree in masonry is only the end of acquiring knowledge of the raw tools. Achieving the mastery those tools enable is apparently far less common.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by Doomsday 2029
 


The duality between the sun and the moon. Forget that good vs evil BS.

2nd.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 07:04 AM
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BayesLike
An analgoue is available in the word "tree." Saying the word "tree" coveys many things simultaneously associated with "treeness" and "non treeness." I'm not familiar with masonic tradition...


Here is the rub. If someone says 'tree' I may think of a Sequoia and you may think of a London Oak, who is right? Neither, since it was not fully explained what the person meant by saying 'tree'. In Masonry, as you are admittedly not familiar with the symbolism, each one is explained in the ritual as to its meaning. If an individual Mason chooses to add further meaning that is his prerogative. It does not however make his personal interpretation anymore valid than another's.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by ChefSlug
 

Bring it on! LOL

reply to post by solarm
 

And?



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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phi1618
ive read that the checkered floor refers to chess, the game of kings. Kinda symbolism for power and maneuvering before striking.

i could be wrong on this.


Mhmm. The checkered floor does represent a chess board. It's all Game Theory. I think that possible reason why this little nod does show up so much in various entertainment media is because the writers probably went through specialized programs as children where they learned basic forms of game theory, starting in the 3rd grade.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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WhiteAlice
It's all Game Theory.


White Alice, you are certainly consistent across many weeks! Those who do understand game theory do definitely have an edge in life and in all things involving interaction.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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AugustusMasonicus
Here is the rub. If someone says 'tree' I may think of a Sequoia and you may think of a London Oak, who is right? Neither, since it was not fully explained what the person meant by saying 'tree'. In Masonry, as you are admittedly not familiar with the symbolism, each one is explained in the ritual as to its meaning. If an individual Mason chooses to add further meaning that is his prerogative. It does not however make his personal interpretation anymore valid than another's.


Augustus -- And in the use of all well chosen symbols the same is true. I'd rather say both are right but both are too specific as well. Each type of tree is merely an exemplar of the concept of "treeness." We can all look at a plant and say: this is a tree, that is not a tree, and there are some plants that look tree-like (but may be merely a stately bush) that we do not know the meaning of the symbol "tree" well enough to truly state to others that the plant is truly a tree. This is just an analogue drawn from Biology of the use of a symbol to which most can easily relate (and carefully chosen for the ambiguity as the reply of exactness in the ritual was predictable).

I have no doubt that the "meaning" is explained in the ritual for the profane to begin their understanding. These are only exemplars of the concepts. Only long experience and reflection in application can teach the true meaning of a well chosen symbol. As in most disciplines, I also have no doubt that only a few will go on to incorporate the symbol in the ritual as something useful in their lives. Regardless of their ability to regurgitate the wording in a ritual or on an exam, it is only those few who achieve the enlightenment intended. The rest will say: "It was explained that this is the meaning." True, but specific exemplars are not the whole meaning. Those who believe that exemplars are the whole meaning are impoverished by their ignorance and lack of insight but may still feel richly rewarded to have the secret revealed to them.

A partial revelation, unexplored and accepted as complete, is more blinding and deceiving than total ignorance. Perhaps this is the greater meaning, the self-deception, alluded to by Pike (?) as mentioned earlier. A wise man IMHO and possibly one a Mason should give more deference to. In one's getting, it is far better to achieve understanding than mere knowledge. The few who go on, only those few will become the adepts -- others may feel they are enlightened, but are ignorant of their lack.
edit on 15-11-2013 by BayesLike because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 10:23 PM
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helen670
The MASON Checkered Black & White Floor... What does it mean?

Hi/

Well to be quite honest, I think it means that they have bad TASTE in furnishings!
I could be wrong, since it is only my opinion.

ICXN
helen



In MY opinion, you are completely wrong.


I love the pattern!



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by BayesLike
 


Symbolism in general is the main point. (IMHO) In masonry, we have meaning to put with certain symbols, and in different situations, that meaning may change or evolve. But perhaps the same symbol we use to associate with industry, may be a completely different symbol to the Knights of Columbus in regards to industry.

Just as if I was in Geometry class, and a gunman burst in the room, but before he could get off a shot, I used my incredible ninja skills (which I got watching Bruce Lee Movies) and stabbed him with the pointy end of a compass and subdued him. Now forever I will look at a compass differently than almost anyone else. Even if I became a mason later in life and was told what Masons regard that symbolism as.

It's dynamic. And if you are initiated into more mystery schools, you may be taught even more symbolism, which might flow over other things you learned. So you cannot say who is right when describing the meaning of a symbol, everyone is, to them.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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BayesLike
Only long experience and reflection in application can teach the true meaning of a well chosen symbol.


I am not sure why I need to keep repeating myself, the ritual teaches the 'true meaning', if an individual Mason chooses to give it further/another meaning then that is his prerogative.





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