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Swine flu thrives in heat; S.C. cases rise

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posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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This surprised me.

Swine flu thrives in heat; S.C. cases rise

The number of confirmed swine flu cases in South Carolina shot up by 34 in the last two weeks, an indication the H1N1 strain is unlike any seen in recent years.

"This is a new virus, and we don't know its behavior well," said state epidemiologist Dr. Jerry Gibson. "We're still learning. Its persistence does seems to be unusual."


In mid-May, SC had 36 confirmed cases. As of 6/13/09, 83 had been confirmed. We've been having 90 - 105 degree weather.




posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:09 PM
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Great, so this hot summer is going to explode the swine flu then ??
Im going to sit in my freezer this summer ...



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:21 PM
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But we still do not know how this flu will react in the cold weather. If it did start in Mexico, then it started in heat. If it thrives in heat, it might just explode in cold weather.



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:34 PM
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Oh crap this is not good news, if the Flu is still at large in the summer then in the winter the cases are going to go through the roof and the deaths will pile up.



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by raz24400
 


Oh, it is winter season in Latin America - and their confirmed cases have escalated pretty significantly.



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by raz24400
But we still do not know how this flu will react in the cold weather. If it did start in Mexico, then it started in heat. If it thrives in heat, it might just explode in cold weather.


Yes but it also hit the Indians in Canada hard a month or so ago, and I don't think Canada was having a heat wave was it?

It appears Indeginous Americans are much more susceptible to this flu, so even if it does spread it may not ever have such a strong impact on the majority of us.

I would like to know WHO these people are, only some cases are being reported, and probably the worst cases whereas the mild cases are not even tested. What was the demographic makeup of those reported in SC?



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by Sonya610
 


I have no idea about the demographics. I'll try to dig that up although I'm not sure how to do that.



posted on Jun, 20 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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A few people have died here in NJ from it the last 2 weeks, its been below normal temperatures and lots of rain here. All reports are they had underlying medical conditions, most healthy people get over it without severe complications.
Also almost everyone Ive known has been sick with a cold in the last month. I find this interesting because most people get and spread colds From September through March. Did we have swine flu without knowing? was it that mild?



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 05:53 AM
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I don't know about weather conditions for this bug, but was sick for 3 full weeks Feb/March when it was cold as possible in Chicago.

Also had lower body temp than normal but felt like I had 103 at least. Worst flu I've ever had and thinking it was H1N1.



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by crw2006Also almost everyone Ive known has been sick with a cold in the last month. I find this interesting because most people get and spread colds From September through March. Did we have swine flu without knowing? was it that mild?


It could have been. Sounds like for most the swine flu isn't even as bad as the regular flu.

CultureD if your body temp was lower than normal perhaps you were poisoned by something? That lowers body temperature, the flu does not.

[edit on 21-6-2009 by Sonya610]



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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I think putting the phrase "shot up" and the # 34 together is a bit of a over-hype (like much of this entire affair). It's a tiny # in the grand scheme of things. But it is a bit troublesome if only because it could linger a very long while, if it can survive and spread during any sort of weather.



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 
H1N1 is hitting O+ people hard. The deep south has a high proportion of people with O+ blood type. The area was settled primarily by the Scotch Irish and the Indians of that area are O+ also.



[edit on 21-6-2009 by eradown]



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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1/2 an hour of sunshine is supposed to kill germs and virus'.
So I'm wondering how the heck it's 'thriving' with people out in the
sunshine during the summer?



posted on Jun, 21 2009 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Most people have central air so most people stay in of a summer. Even so H1N1 is an avian virus. Birds have a much higher temperature than humans.



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by Sonya610
 


Sonya- I know virues cause raised body temps- but many of us on other threads have talked about having had chills, aches, etc., with a flu-type bug, but with NO fever, in fact, some of us had a lowered body temp throughout the illness. I'm wondering if this bug can keep the body from spiking a fever (in order to stay "alive in the body long enough to propagate), an that's why thermal imagers at airports are missing so many people who are actually ill.

I don't see the impossibility. HIV has an essential "cloaking mechanism"; HSV hides on nerve ganglia; why can't this flu mess with the hypothalamus somehow?

Just a theory, but one that seems to be more prevalent that I thought- on the thread where we discussed having been ill in the late winter/early spring, I'd say 10 or 15 people reported a lower-than-normal body temp.

EDIT: to say I had flu for sure- whatever strain it was- I was down for three weeks and sick as a dog- convinced I had a 102-103 fever. It never got above normal.

[edit on 24-6-2009 by CultureD]



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