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Iran Ultimatum to Mousavi: Toe the Line or Else

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posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 11:54 PM
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Iran Ultimatum to Mousavi: Toe the Line or Else


www.foxnews.com

The moderate Iranian leader who says that he was robbed of victory in last week’s presidential election faces a fateful choice today: support the regime or be cast out.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader, has told Mir Hossein Mousavi to stand beside him as he uses Friday prayers at Tehran University to call for national unity. An army of Basiji — Islamic volunteer militiamen — is also expected to be bussed in to support the Supreme Leader.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 11:54 PM
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I have a sinking feeling about this...

It seems that the powers that be in Iran have forgotten their own history. If you push people too hard they will inevitably push back. I think some there feel as if they have been backed into a corner with their backs to a wall. You know what they say about a cornered animal. You can control the some of the people some of the time but not all the people all of the time.

Stay tuned.


www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 18-6-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:07 AM
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Report: Iranian Supreme Leader to Hold Prayers at Tehran University

Iran's supreme leader will conduct a prayer congregation Friday at Tehran University, days after violent clashes there over the country's hotly-disputed presidential election, Tehran's official news service reported.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei will lead Friday prayers on the campus, IRNA reported, amid mass protests against the election results. Backers of opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi have poured into the streets of Tehran Thursday in what he has called "a day of mourning" of those killed in post-election violence.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:17 AM
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This is just going to turn what was once peaceful protest, for the most part, into a violent revolution. This thing has already been going on for a week and the kids aren't slowing down at all.

Looks like Iran will be in full blown revolution by Saturday.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 


One would expect full blown revolution. At this rate Iran is even more volatile about it's governments than the States are at least when it comes to taking action. The militias in Iran are numerous like any other Middle Eastern country and they are likely divided as well. The militias in Iran are supposed to make the bulk of the military forces in Iran so whoever has the siding of them will ultimately be the one in power, but at this point in time it will depend on whether if the Mousavi powerbase can successfully mount operations against the current regime.
Can you say UN/US intervention?



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by spec_ops_wannabe
 


We just need to stay out of it. We are already getting blamed for intervention, and honestly Obama not taking a side and voting present on the issue isn't helping anything.

If the UN or the US goes and sticks their noses in this that will only destabilize the region even more. Let the citizens of the country handle their own matters.

There have been reports that some police officers and militias were siding with the protesters, but those are just rumors, it is pretty much fact that the regime has called in Hama and Hizbollah and that is sure to piss of the some militias.

I also remember hearing something about the army siding with the protesters when ever possible. But they were just peaceful protest for the most part, now it seems like the line has been drawn and its time for them to make up their mind and where they stand.

I don't know, what I do know though is that the UN/US does not need to go sticking their nose into it, they need to let them settle their own problems.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:46 AM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 


Reading through your post brought something to my mind about some of the stuff dealing with the possibility of the shtf here in the States along with other topics like some conflicts in the world and history being sort of experiments of the NWO to see what would happen with certain situations and the populace.

My tinfoil cap is feeling like this could be an experiment on Iran since in many ways Iran is almost just like America in certain ways to the point that we could view Iran like us but on a smaller scale but with slightly more restricted politics I guess.
Seeing how far you can push a smaller fish before you try it on a bigger fish.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 01:06 AM
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The Persians are a passionate people and are fond of outward displays of emotion. This is nothing to be alarmed about.

The Ayatollah has a tremendous advantage in that he gets to bring G-d to the lectern with him and can use that holiest of holies to sway what are for the most part deeply religious people.

They might be willing to buck the President, the elections, but I don’t think the religious nature of the populace is going to so embolden them to directly challenge the supreme rule of the Ayatollahs.

Now the interesting thing to see tomorrow is whether the Ayatollah calls for some fatwa and declares some form of holy crusade or mission for the people to all rally behind and unite on.

Perhaps something very controversial for Israel and the Zionists to further contemplate in addition to just the nuclear issue, since the world isn’t really lining up public opinion wise behind Israel and the Zionists just yet on that one, which is why I would be looking for something galvanizing for the Iranians and enflaming for the Israelis?



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by spec_ops_wannabe
 


If that is the case, I don't think TPTB are liking what is happening over there, these are students with rocks and matches putting up a hell of a resistance, peacefully.

TPTB are probably losing sleep over this situation, because what it all comes down too is a propaganda war, if you can control the info then you win. Not to mention the internet is restricted and censored over there and they are finding ways around it.

Now multiply 2 million students to a cross section of America that consists of military vets, in both spec ops special forces, and regular service and throw in there are enough weapons in this country to put a modern weapon in every man woman and child's hands, and the knowledge that most of the military would defect and fight for the citizens.

They are walking a very thin line and they are already caught up in so many lies it's just a matter of time before what is happening in Iran happens over here.

Plus a whole lot of other stuff, America is already boiling over. If Iran is a test run so I think they made a grave mistake and realize that they just started something they can't finish.

Either way I'm rooting for the people of Iran. If they win it will be world changing. And it isn't about Mousavi, like the media would like you to believe, this is about freedom. Mousavi was just an excuse for this to happen, this has been building for decades.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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In Iran, people await supreme leader's sermon

TEHRAN, Iran (CNN) -- Scrutiny turns to Iran's supreme leader on Friday, when he will deliver a sermon to a nation that has been swept up in several days of post-election protests.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is to speak at mid-day Friday during prayers at Tehran University. That's according to the Basij militia, a voluntary paramilitary force that takes orders from the government.

Khamenei's speech will be scrutinized for signs of how the government plans to resolve a political stalemate that ensued after Iran's hardline president won re-election by a huge margin, quickly prompting allegations of ballot fraud.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 05:52 PM
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Ron Paul Is Sole Dissenter From Resolution Supporting Iranian Protests


The House voted 405-1 today for a resolution in support of the Iranian dissidents and condemning the ruling government. And the one man who opposed it was...Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX).

Paul said in his floor speech that he was in "reluctant opposition" to the resolution -- that he of course condemns violence by governments against their citizens. On the other hand, he also doesn't think the American government should act as a judge of every country overseas, and pointed out that we don't condemn countries like Saudi Arabia or Egypt that don't even have real elections.

"It seems our criticism is selective and applied when there are political points to be made," Paul said. "I have admired President Obama's cautious approach to the situation in Iran and I would have preferred that we in the House had acted similarly."


What more can you say!



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Hastobemoretolife
This is just going to turn what was once peaceful protest, for the most part, into a violent revolution. This thing has already been going on for a week and the kids aren't slowing down at all.

Looks like Iran will be in full blown revolution by Saturday.


Very interesting you say that! According to this thread something echoing the French revolution is supposed to occur on June 21st! (if you look at the graph (I think it's the third or fourth) in the OP, and take a ruler and line up the question mark after the "Air France" occurence, you'll see that it indicates an occurence on June 21.)

I think that IF an Iran revolution does happen, we should really pay attention to that time wave theory. I'd be a little creeped out. Guess we'll wait and see.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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I've been watching footage off and on all day, and whether they will abide by the directive to stop the demonstrations remains to be seen.

Apparently they have been told there will be no more demonstrating, as of tomorrow. There is an implication of "or else", but no details I've heard, as to what the implied repercussions might be. I shudder to think.

Maybe they will abide with the Ayatollah.

May be this could take the turn to a full-blown civil war.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:18 PM
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Well he's right. America is far from being the 'saint' in this world. So who are you to judge Iran. On the other hand I stand in awe of the inaction from the rest of the world and that's where I do give you Americans credits, although I'm afraid it's on the wrong pretenses you give Iran a hard time... Elections were rigged, and the world just sits back and doesn't do a 'real' damn thing about it. Pathetic!


[edit on 19-6-2009 by mortje]



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by mortje
 


Yeah, I was waiting for somebody to say that. Hoping they wouldn't, but knowing they would. It never fails.

We are doing exactly what we should do. Leave Iran to settle their own problems and conflicts.

We don't want Iranians interfering in our internal affairs, and we respect their right to manage their own country. I hope resolutions come quickly and without more bloodshed.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:35 PM
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As an American we are damned if we do and damned if we don't.
It never fails.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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Chants against West punctuate Khamenei's defiant speech

First, a sermon about the dangers of division and disunity, using the language of Islam. Then came secular sentences, decidedly direct. He praised the huge turnout at the polls as a victory for Iran but criticized post-election turmoil as the work of Iran's enemies -- the United States, Israel and Britain.


Yeah right!

As if the US and UK forced people into the street and burn stuff. Give me a break. This only shows how delusional these people are. I mean they pretty much shut down all forms of communications so how exactly did the US and UK ferment this? What they really need to do is grow up and look at themselves and stop blaming everybody else for their own issues.



[edit on 19-6-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:47 PM
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/off topic
Hmm as history has shown your true interest in helping others was mostly based on gaining wealth and power. So sorry to disagree with your 'being doomed if you help or not'...

Anyway I just said I condemn any country, including mine, that doesn't act up against rigged elections in other governments. Everybody is agreeing too much on this game of war.

Stop being such patriots and learn to see the world from a 'world'-perspective...

[edit on 19-6-2009 by mortje]



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by mortje
 


It's really doesn't feel like a game when you are watching airplanes crashing into buildings, and watching then melt to the ground, in your own country.

We've had a civil war here and, I agree. It really, really sucks. I feel so badly for any country who has to face that.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 07:31 PM
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I'm thinking about what Mortje said about having more of a "global" perspective on what happens. And I agree with that.

But at the same time, I almost can't help but draw parallels between my own country, and what is going on now, particularly as it concerns women.
The news folks are saying the Iranian women are now on the "front lines" of these demonstrations. I admire them so much for that.

But I remember decades ago, how American women had to fight and struggle so much for their rights. They were fortunate enough to live in a country where they didn't have to worry about being "shot down", or beaten. But nonetheless, they faced much emotional distress and huge disdain from others, often including their own husbands.

I don't know, do you think it's just part of a society's "social evolution".?

Every country has to find it's own way. The path is not usually rose-scented, unfortunately.




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