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NASA is planning to bomb the Moon

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posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:02 AM
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NASA is planning spectacular mission to bomb the Moon
www.mirror.co.uk...

A space mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral today carrying a missile that will fire a hole deep in the lunar surface.

But this is no gung-ho display of firepower – it is actually a serious quest for water.

Nasa scientists expect the blast to send out a plume of debris visible from Earth.

They want to see if any water or vapour is revealed in the huge space cloud.


Here we go!
www.youtube.com...




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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Intersting snippet BM,
I often wonder where the hell has all the money gone!



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:11 AM
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Suuuuuure it's to find water.

If there is anything, or anyone up there already. . hint, hint, I'm sure this will get their attention. Hollow moon theory should be tested for as well huh?



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:20 AM
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First of allit is not a bomb.


LCROSS, on the other hand, will guide an empty upper stage on a collision course with a permanently shaded crater in an effort to kick up evidence of water at the moon's poles. LCROSS itself will also impact the lunar surface during its course of study.


It is just the upper stage of rocket. It does not contain some fancy explosives and stuff.

See mission overview in the webpage





posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:21 AM
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reply to post by KRISKALI777
 


www.usatoday.com...
According to this article the mission will cost $583 million.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:27 AM
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is this true?...can anyone post more info on it?..like when the impact is going to occur ?...is there anything on NASA website...sry but im at work and couldnt carry out the research myself....will it be visible from earth?

Thank You!!



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:27 AM
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Originally posted by BetweenMyths
reply to post by KRISKALI777
 


www.usatoday.com...
According to this article the mission will cost $583 million.



pocket change compared to the bailouts. Just think of the potential that money could of had.

It all seems a bit cave manesque way of detecting water on the moon. throwing a big missile at it.

If there are aliens, they must view us like we view the monkey using a rock to crack a nut



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:28 AM
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hehe, they are gonna nuke away the bases so all trace will be gone ..

I hope they dont mess up the front side, then Ill sue them..



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by heineken
 


Take a look at the LCROSS website.

LCROSS

There was a video some time back in the NASA website regarding public participation to view the impact. I couldnt find the video. But on the impact date and time, take you telescope or binocular and focus on the southern pole of the moon. And you will be able to see a brief glow from the impact.

Note to everyone:LRO and LCROSS are completely different missions with different objectives; launched on the same rocket. Not to be confused as one single mission.


[edit on June 18th, 2009 by peacejet]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:36 AM
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Ok ,lookie here !!!

LCROSS


Before humans contemplated charting a path to the stars, early explorers used the stars to chart routes to the unknown: new fishing grounds, ports of trade and uncharted lands.

The NASA Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission and NASA Quest are inviting students in grades 5-8 to participate in part one of the NASA Quest Challenge: "Exploration Through Navigation." This two-part challenge asks students the question, "How will you stay on course?"

The first part of the challenge follows the lead of the ancient Polynesians, who charted a course from the Big Island of Hawaii to the Rapa Nui, or Easter Island, a treacherous 4,500-mile route across open ocean. These early navigators loaded their families and meager provisions into ocean-going canoes with the stars in the sky as their guide. The slightest navigation error meant almost certain doom.




The unmanned LCROSS mission – it stands for Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite – will fire a Centaur rocket into the surface at twice the speed of a bullet.

An accompanying spacecraft will orbit the moon for a year looking for possible landing sites for astronauts.


Same sattelite but two difrent topics, from navigation to moon bombing!
Maybe they have upgraded the mission ? and why the need to teach 5 graders too operate space craft ? add ten years they be 15 and maybe astronauts, since there are no more ... ... .. .. around ! ??

[edit on 18-6-2009 by ChemBreather]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:38 AM
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interesting find but i dont think that there is much there going to find, the real concern in how much back blast are we going to recive from the explosion and what is coming back with it.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:41 AM
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Here's a bit more info
blogs.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:42 AM
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reply to post by ChemBreather
 


Dude, now what is the problem with the kids challenge contest. It is refering to the star navigation used by almost all space craft which is similar to the ones used by sailors in the old days.

celestial navigation




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:47 AM
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reply to post by peacejet
 


Nothing wrong with that, I was just wondering if there an back agenda here.

I think teaching yousters space vehicle operations is swell, the 'future' is the kids after all..




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:51 AM
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LOL, I heard about their plans for this awhile back.

What a buncha fools. Like we can't put a rover on Mars or anything. Like we can't just make a drill or anything. I guess it's cost effective, but wow this just stinks of stupidity... or something else.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by peacejet
reply to post by heineken
 


Take a look at the LCROSS website.

LCROSS

There was a video some time back in the NASA website regarding public participation to view the impact. I couldnt find the video. But on the impact date and time, take you telescope or binocular and focus on the southern pole of the moon. And you will be able to see a brief glow from the impact.

Note to everyone:LRO and LCROSS are completely different missions with different objectives; launched on the same rocket. Not to be confused as one single mission.


[edit on June 18th, 2009 by peacejet]


10q, the site is awesome..one question...why it will take 111 days for impact?...its quite a bit of time..why not 7 days or so?



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:04 AM
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A while back (2 ys approx) they fired a ground penetrating missile at the moon, it penetrated and designed to explode under the surface. The mission was covered by msm (BBC) abd mentioned here somewhere on ATS. It was an astounding operation and the story seemed to be buried quickly. Is this a related event?



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:05 AM
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reply to post by heineken
 


During space missions, some missions are designed in such a way that the space craft doesnt leave the earth directly and travel towards the moon. Instead they launch into space with elliptical orbit. The elliptical orbit has an apogee and perigee. Perigee is the closest approach with respect to earth and apogee is the farthest distance with respect to earth.

So, over the days the space craft will adjust its orbit to increase its apogee steadily and eventually get captured by the moons orbit.


The Shepherding Spacecraft and Centaur rocket are launched together with another spacecraft called the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). All three are connected to each other for launch, but then the LRO separates one hour after launch. The Shepherding Spacecraft guides the Centaur rocket through multiple Earth orbits, each taking about 38 days. The rocket then separates from the Shepherding Spacecraft and impacts the Moon at more than twice the speed of a bullet, causing an impact that results in a big plume or cloud of lunar debris, and possibly water.


Take a look at the earth orbit movie in the web page.

Mission

These are all amazing wonders of our technological capability. It is only that we fail to appreciate these wonders.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:11 AM
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reply to post by KRISKALI777
 


ask the fed LOL!!

sorry i couldn't resist



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:36 AM
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I am not a believer of aliens on the moon theory or that it is an ancient spacecraft (hollow moon theory), however if there were ...
it could be seen as a declaration of war. Could acts like this actually spark an interstellar war?

Let's hope not. I would hate for War of the Worlds to be become fact.



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