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Possible UFO spotted near Saturn

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posted on Jun, 17 2009 @ 08:29 PM
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This isn't a "possible" UFO, it is a UFO. It's an object in flight that you cannot identify. Some people get the perception that every UFO has to have ET's in it in order to be classified as a UFO.

Great find though, star and flag for you.




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:56 AM
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The interesting thing is that the brightest object clearly move like the others pointed by Scooby, but we need to wait the calibration to speculate to what object is.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:11 AM
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Thought we did this already


Gigantic Alien Craft Photographed By Cassini! NASA’s Cover-Up Blown?www.abovetopsecret.com...

bout half way into the thread



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 10:05 AM
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Well here's another interesting object. The details are in my thread here....

Alien Spaceship(?) Shooting Plasma-Like Jets Near Saturn!!

And now here's an animation of that object (lower down in the frame) produced by internos in that thread..



So for those who think it's just a star, look again! This one's a smasher!

Cheers!



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 


Hmm.. It is clearly something. Maybe a UFO, or maybe a weather phenom. I dunno, but it is interesting



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 

Here's another animation which shows the "jet" to be an optical effect which occurs when a moon enters and leaves the frame.


From this post:
www.abovetopsecret.com...


[edit on 6/18/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Well, that's what you feel! As far as I and many others are concerned, it does NOT look like an optical effect! However, the jury is still out on this one!

Cheers!



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 


Hey Mike,

Is there a way we can do a play by play on that one, slow it down, frame by frame.


FlAG ThE MuThA.

[edit on 18-6-2009 by menguard]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by ImShrike
 


Thats very very interesting. Is the object a confirmed star? How can a star suddenly vanish from view like that? Very strange



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by Phage


all that bright stuff going on and yet Cassini can still see the stars. I guess the space around Saturn is not as dark as it is near the moon.

Unless of course those little spots are ice particles from the thruster jet




[edit on 18-6-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by ImShrike
 


considering there are DOZENS of straight lines appearing in single frames, this is in all likelihood just the camera catching tons of fast moving objects on a long exposure. sure, they could be anything, but remember this is saturn we're talking about. there are a whole lot of objects in orbit. notice the rings?

very unconvinced of anything out of the ordinary here.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
all that bright stuff going on and yet Cassini can still see the stars. I guess the space around Saturn is not as dark as it is near the moon.

[edit on 18-6-2009 by zorgon]


huh?
space is not dark near the moon, but so much light reflects off the surface it will drown out the stars during daylight. saturn is quite a bit farther away and the camera is not facing Saturn or perpendicular to it. i wouldn't expect the stars to be drowned out at all in this shot.

its much the same reason that you cannot see the stars during the day on earth. there is so much light coming from the sun that the light from stars is completely overwhelmed. also the same reason you can hardly see the stars from the city. (go somewhere like the top of a mountain in the wilderness and prepare to be amazed at how beautiful the night sky truly is if you haven't already - i saw the sky at the top of mt pichincha in ecuador and it was *STUNNING*).



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:03 PM
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It's nothing to do with day and night. Only planets with a dense atmosphere exhibit daytime/nightime differences. On the airless moon, the sky on the sunny side of the body is just as black as it is on the 'night' side. The sun will oviously affect your ability to see if it's shining into your eyes, but if you shade the sun with your hand, it's as black as night in the sky.

WG3



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by JScytale
space is not dark near the moon,


Really?


Well I still say this sure looks like a tether satellite to me...




Original

from Mike's Thread
www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 18-6-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by Phage


all that bright stuff going on and yet Cassini can still see the stars. I guess the space around Saturn is not as dark as it is near the moon.

Unless of course those little spots are ice particles from the thruster jet




[edit on 18-6-2009 by zorgon]


I was thinking that same thing. Why can we see the stars? Hmm? I thought you weren't supposed to be able to see stars from a camera in space Mr. Nasa! HMM! HMM!

On a personal note, I think phage is right..



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


They are long exposures though, because of that some starlight is visible. This is an interesting series of images, but like Mike said, the jury is still out.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Any closer or higher resolution pictures of the 'tether'? I would be anxious to see it, your theory is intriguing.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by jkrog08
They are long exposures though, because of that some starlight is visible. This is an interesting series of images, but like Mike said, the jury is still out.


Really? Long exposures that leave the stars round?

On my planet this is what long exposures of stars look like;

All the same length



Caption Leo (and Saturn) Star Trail
Credit by Dave Pearson

www.redbubble.com...

[edit on 18-6-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


I don't think the surface of Cassini is rotating at the same rate as the surface of your planet.

The exposure times of the images taken by Cassini vary quite a bit but are generally not "snapshots". Actually, Cassini is capable of tracking objects, here's what happens to the stars when a close, fast moving object is being tracked.
Iapetus


[edit on 6/18/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


So do you agree that the exposures are at least moderate in length?



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