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Iranians Revolt - Latest News

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posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 


No the current situation in Iran does not bode well for the old heads in the White House, i.e. the non-elected permanent officials that have held top positions for 30 or more years.

They want war with Iran all our troops are stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan and gives them a convenient front to mobilize a ground invasion into Iran. The revolution that is playing out over there kills all pre-written plans for the war profiteers.

Not only that, but there is a staggering amount of support for the protesters and now they don't have the political capital to conduct any operations in Iran. This will be a full changing of the regime and it looks like it has the momentum to succeed and I hope it does.

Not only that, but the "present" vote by Obama is making all sane people think about his true intentions. And this is giving the American people a gut check, the fear mongering of Marital Law is breaking down.

People are seeing that there is strength in numbers and when you reach critical mass there is no stopping it.

[edit on 15-6-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



No the current situation in Iran does not bode well for the old heads in the White House, i.e.


just wondering who you think the "old heads" are?

also, what would america gain from some ground invasion of iran? besides major casualties?



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 


I explained right after that, the people that are permanent fixtures in the white house. The long time advisers that don't ever get replaced. The weapons lobby that have direct connection to the Pentagon.

Look at history, we are in the beginning of a depression, WWI started during a depression, WWII started during a depression, etc.

They want war because it's supposed to be good for the "economy".



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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The Cyberattacks have begun.


n apparently ad-hoc cyber protest against the results of recent Iranian elections has knocked key Web sites off-line.

On Monday, sites belonging to Iranian news agencies, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, were knocked off-line after activists opposed to the Iranian government posted tools designed to barrage these Web sites with traffic.

Danchev counts 12 sites as being under attack, including other news agencies, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Justice, National Police, and the Ministry of the Interior.



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by Agit8dChop




clearly, you really dont care what i say or believe

youve labeled me
- unintellegent
- loner
- tin hat wearing



Yes, after you called another poster an idiot because he disagreed with you. You are free to speculate to your heart's content. I don't care for those attempt to pass off speculation as fact.

If you don't want to be called on it then don't attack other posters because they disagree with your unfounded speculation.



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:01 PM
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Originally posted by UnderTheirRadar

WHY DO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE NOT DO THIS?
WHY HAVEN'T WE ALREADY?
I've come to despise the fact that so many people are pissed off but NO ONE DOES ANYTHING!!! I'm sorry for the caps but my rage Is on full throttle!!!


Mark my words. Soon you will be seeing the same In the U.S.


For one thing the situation in Iran is not remotely similar to this country. It's silly to equate one to the other. Let's at least try to keep perspective here, shall we?



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



I explained right after that, the people that are permanent fixtures in the white house. The long time advisers that don't ever get replaced.


im not saying you are wrong, but can you give an example or two?

as for the economy in a depression thing..I believe it is all relative.

while some areas have been in "depression" in America for quite some time, other areas are even still in a "booming" phase. certainly it can be stated that much of the country is treading water...and of course when bubbles get created, they must be burst...I believe that bubble is still in burst mode...hopefully war is not the way out.

I personally dont think it will be, as war will not have the same effects on the economy it did in the 30's. just my take...if they wanted war, it would have been done by now (my assumption)



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 


maybe you are refferring to the cfr? or different groups that "advise" th united nations? certainly they will do their best to influence american and world policy...we know its been done successfully before.



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 



im not saying you are wrong, but can you give an example or two?


Do you really need me to answer this for you?



as for the economy in a depression thing..I believe it is all relative.

while some areas have been in "depression" in America for quite some time, other areas are even still in a "booming" phase. certainly it can be stated that much of the country is treading water...and of course when bubbles get created, they must be burst...I believe that bubble is still in burst mode...hopefully war is not the way out.


Have you been paying attention to the news?


I'm not trying to be rude, I'm just saying.

[edit on 15-6-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



Have you been paying attention to the news?


I intentionally do my best to steer far clear from the msm (main stream media).

You should take elmost everything you here on msnbc, cnn and especially fox news with a grain of salt my friend.

if i was you i would watch local news only. i gave you a realists view of the current economic conditions. i believe my comments portrayed the economy as a whole pretty accurately.

i assure you, there are still very many rich people, very many middle class people and of course more poor than both those other classes combined and growing by the day. but we are still far from a country wide depression status...



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



Do you really need me to answer this for you?


yes. I would like an example or two as to who you believe these "heads" to be.

edit to add;

i would like to know who you think they are because i dont believe war is in the works...and you seem to think it is. i dont see any clear advantage for america or its fascits corporations.

[edit on 15-6-2009 by open_eyeballs]



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 


I guess that is why unemployment in my state is 11+%? And the national average of real unemployment is somewhere around 16%+.

Alright we can't derail this thread.

_________________________

It seems as though news coming out of Iran is few and far between. They must really be getting in the thick of it now. Protest in all cities across the nation. The last Tweet I saw was 3 hours ago and the person couldn't explain just that situation was tense.



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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Here's some photos from yesteday/last nights protest.
One big thing to note. Mosavi, ignored the Ayatollah and attended.
He was advised if he attended he would be attacked and responsible for all that occurs.
















































these are from Tehran Uni, where Basij forces surrounded the uni and stormed it attacking students.





Take note of the Basij they captured and handed out some punishment




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Manouche
A CIA involvement is possible but it is still speculations so far.


I've sketched out the American links here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 11:48 PM
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George Friedman at Stratfor's weekly geopolitical report handily summarizes the events in Iran this week. They are considered the best analysis of worldwide political activities.

Friedman has a better informed view of Iran than most Western sources. He claims we tend to impose our expectations on people over there bases on a tiny fraction of English speaking Westernized liberals who explain the country from their perspective.

Shocking as it may be to most of us, the election was not necessarily fixed as we like to believe.

Mike



www.stratfor.com...

Americans and Europeans have been misreading Iran for 30 years. Even after the Shah fell, the myth has survived that a mass movement of people exists demanding liberalization — a movement that if encouraged by the West eventually would form a majority and rule the country. We call this outlook “iPod liberalism,” the idea that anyone who listens to rock ‘n’ roll on an iPod, writes blogs and knows what it means to Twitter must be an enthusiastic supporter of Western liberalism. Even more significantly, this outlook fails to recognize that iPod owners represent a small minority in Iran — a country that is poor, pious and content on the whole with the revolution forged 30 years ago.

There are undoubtedly people who want to liberalize the Iranian regime. They are to be found among the professional classes in Tehran, as well as among students. Many speak English, making them accessible to the touring journalists, diplomats and intelligence people who pass through. They are the ones who can speak to Westerners, and they are the ones willing to speak to Westerners. And these people give Westerners a wildly distorted view of Iran. They can create the impression that a fantastic liberalization is at hand — but not when you realize that iPod-owning Anglophones are not exactly the majority in Iran.

Last Friday, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was re-elected with about two-thirds of the vote. Supporters of his opponent, both inside and outside Iran, were stunned. A poll revealed that former Iranian Prime Minister Mir Hossein Mousavi was beating Ahmadinejad. It is, of course, interesting to meditate on how you could conduct a poll in a country where phones are not universal, and making a call once you have found a phone can be a trial. A poll therefore would probably reach people who had phones and lived in Tehran and other urban areas. Among those, Mousavi probably did win. But outside Tehran, and beyond persons easy to poll, the numbers turned out quite different.

Some still charge that Ahmadinejad cheated. That is certainly a possibility, but it is difficult to see how he could have stolen the election by such a large margin. Doing so would have required the involvement of an incredible number of people, and would have risked creating numbers that quite plainly did not jibe with sentiment in each precinct. Widespread fraud would mean that Ahmadinejad manufactured numbers in Tehran without any regard for the vote. But he has many powerful enemies who would quickly have spotted this and would have called him on it. Mousavi still insists he was robbed, and we must remain open to the possibility that he was, although it is hard to see the mechanics of this.

It also misses a crucial point: Ahmadinejad enjoys widespread popularity. He doesn’t speak to the issues that matter to the urban professionals, namely, the economy and liberalization. But Ahmadinejad speaks to three fundamental issues that accord with the rest of the country.

First, Ahmadinejad speaks of piety. Among vast swathes of Iranian society, the willingness to speak unaffectedly about religion is crucial. Though it may be difficult for Americans and Europeans to believe, there are people in the world to whom economic progress is not of the essence; people who want to maintain their communities as they are and live the way their grandparents lived. These are people who see modernization — whether from the shah or Mousavi — as unattractive. They forgive Ahmadinejad his economic failures.

Second, Ahmadinejad speaks of corruption. There is a sense in the countryside that the ayatollahs — who enjoy enormous wealth and power, and often have lifestyles that reflect this — have corrupted the Islamic Revolution. Ahmadinejad is disliked by many of the religious elite precisely because he has systematically raised the corruption issue, which resonates in the countryside.

Third, Ahmadinejad is a spokesman for Iranian national security, a tremendously popular stance. It must always be remembered that Iran fought a war with Iraq in the 1980s that lasted eight years, cost untold lives and suffering, and effectively ended in its defeat. Iranians, particularly the poor, experienced this war on an intimate level. They fought in the war, and lost husbands and sons in it. As in other countries, memories of a lost war don’t necessarily delegitimize the regime. Rather, they can generate hopes for a resurgent Iran, thus validating the sacrifices made in that war — something Ahmadinejad taps into. By arguing that Iran should not back down but become a major power, he speaks to the veterans and their families, who want something positive to emerge from all their sacrifices in the war.

Perhaps the greatest factor in Ahmadinejad’s favor is that Mousavi spoke for the better districts of Tehran — something akin to running a U.S. presidential election as a spokesman for Georgetown and the Lower East Side. Such a base will get you hammered, and Mousavi got hammered. Fraud or not, Ahmadinejad won and he won significantly. That he won is not the mystery; the mystery is why others thought he wouldn’t win.

For a time on Friday, it seemed that Mousavi might be able to call for an uprising in Tehran. But the moment passed when Ahmadinejad’s security forces on motorcycles intervened. And that leaves the West with its worst-case scenario: a democratically elected anti-liberal.

Western democracies assume that publics will elect liberals who will protect their rights. In reality, it’s a more complicated world.


[edit on 16-6-2009 by mmiichael]



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


wow..great pics...but one stands out from the rest (in my opinion)

look at the pic that shows the buses unloading all the people...i find this odd.
it could mean a multitude of things. for example.

1. the law enforcement (the ayotollas..sp?) has absolutely no control of the situation and can not even stop the local mass transit system from aiding the rioters

2. the riots are not that bad and these are pics of a coordinated (staged)rally of some sorts...

3.if true revolution is in effect and rioting is out of control then there would be no one working busses. there would be no gasoline to fill the tanks of the busses. in other words the economy collapses and the only coordination efforts are left to the police

just a few thuings that may be worth considering...

to put this thing in perspective..could you see the scat (southern california area transit) busses taking hundreds of rioters to downtown los angeles in the early 90s when the rodney king riots took place?


[edit on 15-6-2009 by open_eyeballs]



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 12:01 AM
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These buses arent taking 'people' to the rally.

The buses are full of plained clothed basij.

Basij are the ones surrounded Tehrran uni, storming it and beaeting people up.

Basij are the ones on motorcycles in plain clothes with pillion passengers holding batons.

They deploy busloads of basij amongst the rioters, the basij split up in groups and go around finding key people, sneaking up on the group etc etc.

The people walk everything, alot of central tehran is blocked off, roads closed etc etc.



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


are you saying they are part of crowd control?

it looks as if there are women in the bus crowd waiting to get out..

that doesnt seem like the role of a woman in Iran.

edit to add:

could you clarify who the 'basij' are?

[edit on 16-6-2009 by open_eyeballs]



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 12:10 AM
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Oh man Dejavu all over again.

I say good for the Iranians. I hope the people fair well.



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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Are we talking about the right bus ?



I dont see anyone crowding to get off,
I see a women being physically manhandled,

is this the picture your talking of ?

Basij are like.. blackwater for the US

They are volunteer militia who take orders from the revolutionary guard.
they are mean and violent.
Some people are hearing them talk Arab, because the persians apparently started protesting WITH the crowd. This hasnt been confirmed.


BASIJ:



[edit on 16-6-2009 by Agit8dChop]



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