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Locations of high-risk coal ash sites kept secret

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posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 12:40 PM
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Locations of high-risk coal ash sites kept secret


news.yahoo.com

The Obama administration wants to keep secret the locations of nearly four dozen coal ash storage sites that pose a threat to people living nearby.
(visit the link for the full news article)


This is a coal ash sludge spill






Related News Links:
www.wbir.com
www.post-gazette.com
www.knoxnews.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Coal Ash is MORE Radioactive Than Nuclear Waste
“Clean” coal ash flood may make new Superfund site
Bush EPA Hid Data on Coal-Ash Risks, Study Shows


[edit on 12-6-2009 by MysterE]




posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 12:40 PM
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The Environmental Protection Agency identified the 44 sites as potential hazards to communities while investigating storage of coal ash waste after a spill at a Tennessee power plant in December. The sites have existed for years with little or no federal regulation.


Insert your zipcode in this link and see how much coal ash is near you!

I didn't realize just how much ash we are storing around the US. I'm not too far from 1277.5 Tones of it! Do you think it is a good thing that these locations are kept secret? What if it puts people in danger? Is the danger of people knowing the locations more impirtant then the danger of living near this stuff and not knowing it?


news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 12-6-2009 by MysterE]



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by MysterE



The Environmental Protection Agency identified the 44 sites as potential hazards to communities while investigating storage of coal ash waste after a spill at a Tennessee power plant in December. The sites have existed for years with little or no federal regulation.


Insert your zipcode in this link and see how much coal ash is near you!

I didn't realize just how much ash we are storing around the US. I'm not too far from 1277.5 Tones of it! Do you think it is a good thing that these locations are kept secret? What if it puts people in danger? Is the danger of people knowing the locations more impirtant then the danger of living near this stuff and not knowing it?


news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 12-6-2009 by MysterE]


It says the page no longer exists for me MysterE.. Dunno if it's ol' black ops or failed connection.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by RenDMC
 


Oops! Should work now! Or just click here Thanks for the heads up!

-E-

[edit on 12-6-2009 by MysterE]



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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Well I tried the actual website for the link he posted....

Public Integrity

However I can't find anything along the lines of what you were describing...

Another link perhaps? More direction?

I don't know I'm kinda zooted.

Haha.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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This is being done under the guise of "terrorist" knowing there location to be able to blow up a levee and destroy a town, city with the coal ash.

In actuality, the coal conglomerates do not want the nasty truth known about "clean coal". This is simply another case of sweep the dirty little secret under the rug.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:15 PM
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Wow...123 THOUSAND TONS stored in MY neighborhood. Too bad we couldn't use it to heat our house or something.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by KSPigpen
Wow...123 THOUSAND TONS stored in MY neighborhood. Too bad we couldn't use it to heat our house or something.


Here are some uses for coal ash
Other beneficial uses of coal ash

-E-



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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I made a visit to the Kingston site a few weeks ago....

Let me tell you it will be years before that place is anywhere near habitable again.

But hey, there is plenty of land for us to use and abuse right?

[edit on 12-6-2009 by TwiTcHomatic]



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:35 PM
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why dont they sell it? could sell it to alter the PH of soil. just bag the stuff up, and export it.



posted on Jun, 29 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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Looks like they are coughing up the locations
EPA relents, discloses list of high-risk coal ash sites

-E-



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by MysterE
 


First let me start out by saying that I do not noramaly dig into things as much and as quick as I have for this subject but the area in concern has been quite an interest of mine for some time now.
After taking a look at your post and reading a little bit into the whole ordeal I decided to do a little investigating of my own. I would like to share my findings here if no one has a problem with that


The first place that I began to look at was the White Bluff Generating plant which I located through this link
projects.publicintegrity.org...
Through this I found out that White Bluff had 129.3 thousand tons stored in a landfill disposal.

White Bluff is located approximately 26 miles south of Little Rock Arkansas which has a population of 187,452 according to the US census in 2007
Little Rock

The greater Little Rock Metro area (Little Rock, North Little Rock and Pine Bluff) population is 850,561 according to the 2008 estimate
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Pine Bluff combined statistical area

The thing that makes this plant so interesting to me is that fact that it is sitting literally right on the banks of the Arkansas River which in a short distance connects with the Mississippi river.


But that is not all, upon doing a little more digging I found a couple more sites in the area that raise a couple of flags in my book. This brings me to my second discovery: NCTR


The National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) conducts FDA mission-critical, peer-reviewed, critical path (translational) research targeted to develop a scientifically sound basis for regulatory decisions and reduce risks associated with FDA-regulated products. This research is aimed at: * evaluating the biological effects of potentially toxic chemicals or microorganisms * defining the complex mechanisms that govern their toxicity * understanding critical biological events in the expression of toxicity * developing methods to improve assessment of human exposure, susceptibility, and risk. NCTR’s research efforts support the FDA’s Strategic Goals: * FDA Strategic Goal 1: Strengthen FDA for Today and Tomorrow * FDA Strategic Goal 2: Improve Patient and Consumer Safety * FDA Strategic Goal 3: Increase Access to New Medical and Food Products * FDA Strategic Goal 4: Improve the Quality and Safety of Manufactured Products and the Supply Chain

FDA

This is located just 7 miles south of White Bluff Generating plant, and also sits on the banks of the Arkansas River.

But thats not all folks

Located just 4 miles south of NCTR is the Pine Bluff Arsenal which also sits right along the banks of the Arkansas River...


Pine Bluff Arsenal located in Southeast Arkansas, is 35 miles Southeast of Little Rock and 8 miles Northwest of the City of Pine Bluff. PBA is bordered on the East by the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System and on the West by the Union Pacific Railroad and U.S. Highway 65, making it directly accessible by rail, road, or waterway. The City of Pine Bluff boasts on of the busiest ports on the Arkansas River and serves as a transportation hub for the regional railroads. PBA is located 35 miles south of the Little Rock National Airport, and 40 miles from Little Rock Air Force Base.



A biological weapons mission was added in 1953 and continued until 1969. Pine Bluff was the site of the Production Development Laboratories, responsible for manufacturing and loading biological munitions. President Nixon banned biological weapons in 1969 and manufacturing ceased. The bioweapons production facility at Pine Bluff was abandoned and partly dismantled in 1969. In 1972, this part of the complex was renamed the National Center for Toxicological Research, removed from the jurisdiction of the Arsenal and placed under the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Currently, it manufactures chemical, smoke, riot control, incendiary, and pyrotechnic mixes and munitions. Limited production facilities also are used to manufacture chemical defense items such as clothing and protective masks. Pine Bluff is the only active site at which white phosphorous-filled weapons are loaded.

www.globalsecurity.org...


(PBA) is one of six Army installations in the United States that currently store chemical weapons. The chemical weapons stored at the arsenal consist of various munitions and ton containers, containing GB or VX nerve agents or HD blister agent. The Army is working in partnership with Arkansas state and local government agencies, as well as federal agencies like the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to safeguard the local community and protect the environment as we store and dispose of these chemical weapons. The Army has safely stored approximately 12 percent of the nation’s original chemical weapons at the arsenal since 1942.

www.cma.army.mil...

Here is a map through Google with some spots and links in case anyone would really like to see how close in proximity these places are to each other.
Google Maps: Hazerdous Material Hotspots

All three of these sites bother me but for different reasons... The fact that they are all in such close proximity makes it just down right crazy.

All located in quiet little southern Arkansas

The Ironic thing is this... the area that these facilities are located is called Samples.

Again, I normally don't put too much effort into researching these things but like I said, the whole area has been on my mind for quite some time and if it weren't for you OP and your enlightening news article about coal ash deposits, I would have never looked into any of this.



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by hippy2012
 


Wow! Great research Hippy! There sure is alot of hazardous areas in the Little Rick Area. The ash site near the Arkansas River is particularly interesting. You would think they would want to distance themselves from that at all costs, but what do I know?

Great Contribution!
-E-



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