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Iran election race tightens

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posted on Jun, 11 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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Iran election race tightens


edition.cnn.com

TEHRAN, Iran (CNN) -- The day before polls open in Iran's presidential election, the streets are suddenly quiet again as official campaigning comes to an end, and voters prepare for what is expected to be a record turnout.
Posters for all four candidates are pasted on walls.

Whereas President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was a sure bet just 10 days ago, the race has closed this past week, in what is clearly turning into a referendum on his four years in office.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 11 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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It seems that Western media are not too interested in the elections taking place in Iran tomorrow. I guess some particular groups don't want Iran's villain image not to be broken.

There is a distinct possibility that the pro-Western Moussavi will win the elections. Moderate Iranians are fed up with Ahmadinejad. He promised economic reforms and more prosperity but achieved the opposite. Inflation is sky high and the unemployment rate doesn't seem to stop rising.

Yesterday, tens of thousands Iranians celebrated the possibility of a soon to come change. They don't want Ahmadinejad, they don't want to be vilified, they want to live like we do.

Iran had always been a very progressive country, until the revolution. If these lunatics wouldn't have seized control of the country, Iran would likely be a highly dominant and prosperous power in the region.

Although I don't see a need to further elaborate on ATS that Iranians are intelligent and liberal people, it's a pity that many people in the West seem to believe the stigmatizing propaganda stories told by our MSM.



edition.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 11 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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I hope that the pro-Western candidate wins. I think that that could really have some impact on the Middle East, and it would naturally turn Iran around as sanctions would be lifted because, quite frankly, people would feel more comfortable with a pro-West guy in there and he'd probably be more willing to talk as well.

Does anyone happen to know when the new, possibly, president would be inaugurated? I ask because, if it's like in America, with a few month wait, I would wonder if there would be a chance that Ahmadinejad could do something dumb in the Middle East. Kinda like a, "going out with a bang" type mentality.



posted on Jun, 11 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by octotom

Does anyone happen to know when the new, possibly, president would be inaugurated? I ask because, if it's like in America, with a few month wait, I would wonder if there would be a chance that Ahmadinejad could do something dumb in the Middle East. Kinda like a, "going out with a bang" type mentality.


First of all, Ahmadinejad is a mere puppet. He cannot act alone and do something stupid unless the Ayatollahs approve it. The Ayatollahs are extremists, but they are far from stupid and they would never launch a nuclear strike on Israel. That's complete baloney made up by Israel as poor excuse to prevent a Muslim power from becoming equally powerful, whereas the Ayatollahs want to become a regional power.

However, I don't know how the inauguration exactly works, but Iran is close to a revolution should he refuse to give up power. Thens of thousands, primarily young people, are on the streets. They want freedom. They feel their president made their country look like a fool.



posted on Jun, 11 2009 @ 06:07 PM
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I've been reading the polls posted on the Wikipedia article, and it is very clear, every polling agency has an agenda. None of these polls are accurate. But considering that there is so much enthusiasm among the youth and women for Mousavi, one could say the election is very close.

I am pulling for Mousavi only because he seems more approachable in terms of foreign policy and he seems promising in pushing for greater freedoms.

As for the inauguration, I think it is August 2 or 3. Four of the six Presidents were inaugurated on that day.

All of this reminds me of the election last year though. I was very enthusiastic to vote and wanted change and it is very clear many people in Iran want change.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 01:44 AM
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Mousavi isnt really as `pro west` as you make out - eceryone in Iran remeber the coup that the usa and uk did that reomved the democratically elected leader and shoved the despot shah back in power.


so , no he`s not `pro west` but he is far more moderate than the conservative incumbant

he would be a `liberal democrate` in uk parties - sadly theres no comparison with USA parties since the main both the same.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:01 AM
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reply to post by MasterRegal
 


Sadly though there just not going to get it, they really don't have control over much because one of the people they can elect, The President is under the control of the Supreme Leader which is not elected but appointed and then confirmed by the rubber stamped Guardian Council.

The President was put into place as a kind of democracy venting program so people would feel like they had some control and would therefore be less likely to start a revolution. It is kind of like the democracy wall in China.

All I am saying is don't expect much to change. Which is sad because so much needs to change all over the world.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by octotom
 


Are you sure that this will solve problems. On the contrary as we all have seen any pro government put into power within the middle east always end's up with a war on its neighbor.



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:55 AM
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can't remember the exact quote, but I think it was Stalin who once remarked the power lies not in the one who votes but the one who counts the vote.

There really can be no reformer in Iranian politics. He'd be disqualified as a candidate as they do with the best people to represent constituencies.

Khameini who really runs the country has decided Mr A will not win this time.
The youth voters hate A with a passion, and the semblance of change is looked for. Think Obama in the US.

In fact Obama might get all wam and gushy with the new leader.

Mr A's delusional histrionics have given the country's such a bad rep, he will sort of be the Bush of Iran.

Watch for change.


Mike



posted on Jun, 12 2009 @ 02:56 AM
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Moussavi is a revolutionary zealot and was guilty of henius crimes against his own people during his tenure as prime minster. This image of a moderate reformist is farcical. He is however less of an embrassment than Ahmadi and shows more restraint, wisdom and diplomatic prowess.

For those that are well-versed on iranian domestic affairs, these crowds on the street for Moussavi are merely a protest at the incumbent Ahmadinejad. This is their chance to protest under the guise of supporting another candidate. If there wasn't an election these crowds would have been removed with extreme force (if they dared protest at all).

The mullahs have already won this election, they have given off the impression of a democratic process, when in fact this is anything but.



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