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Mysterious White ball appears after a hand gun is shot

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posted on Jun, 14 2009 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by alaskan
 


In any combustion, you end up with carbon dioxide and water as an end result. You are simply seeing high velocity carbon dioxide and water spewing out of the gun. This probably includes a few other gases common in the atmosphere, which also escape when the round is fired, since the barrel is open on one end atmosphere exists inside prior to being shot. It's all about compression and chemical reactions.




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 04:40 AM
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i basically think that it is either dust coming out of the barrel or the sonic boom.... in alot of slowed down fotege there is a white ball lol so no its not supernatual lol



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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reply to post by shadowwolf0
 


I'd like you to show us where we can see that other film footage that you are talking about. Care to enlighten us further?




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by joesomebody
 


Hi Joe Somebody,

Your explanation is at the very, very top of the list, and all alone; for what I believe to be correct even though we still haven't proven it. I still would place money on your answer being correct.

Thanks for helping out my friend.




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by RussianScientists
I'm a scientist, and I see a round off-white perfect sphere coming out of the gun at a much, much slower motion...anyone can look at it and see it is not on fire and it is not burning and yet it disappears... I'd like to hear from someone that is really, really looking closely at that ball coming out of the end of that gun.

"Anyone can look at it and see" is not a scientific approach. A more scientific approach is "Everyone is looking at it and nobody has a clue, so what can we discern from our observations?"

First of all, you should be aware that the weapon you see in this vid is a 19th Century revolver, looks like a Colt Navy 45, but don't hold me to that. Definitely 19th Century, though. In the late 19th Century, these handguns fired black-powder cartridges — and I suppose this video is demonstrating ammunition that is authentic to the weapon. Black powder produced a lot of sooty smoke, as you can see in the video. Very nasty stuff, with a lot of residual debris.

What we're looking at is a slo-mo of something that transpires in a fraction of a second — the pistol is still recoiling from the shot. It's likely that, after the initial discharge, air rushes through the barrel quite forcefully, enough so to dislodge and eject a bit of the residual debris, which exits the barrel and disintegrates...or seems to disappear.

There's a good chance that it's paper, given that paper cartridges were used in the early revolvers. Again, if this video is demonstrating a 19th Century firearm with authentic 19th Century ammunition, you could be looking at a fragile fragment of the paper cartridge.

— Doc Velocity






[edit on 6/15/2009 by Doc Velocity]



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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Here you go...

Modern Use of Paper Cartridges in Replica Pistols

Importantly, the author observes: "You don't want any old paper left in the chamber, and a quick visual inspection is important to verify this."

Which indicates to me that paper cartridges do leave paper debris behind after firing.

BTW, here's a shot of an 1861 Navy Colt, which is not the same as the weapon in the vid, but it looks similar, has that 19th Century styling:



— Doc Velocity





[edit on 6/15/2009 by Doc Velocity]



posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 


Hi Do Velocity,

I've never seen paper debris evaporate, so that rules that idea out of existence. I'm pretty sure air didn't rush right back into the end of the barrel of the gun either. Air definitely rushed into the barrel via the barrel/cylinder area, but not from the front of the gun. Vacuum alone after the blast was enough to pull all gases, liquids and solids forwards. I saw gases and solids leave, and then I saw an off-white ball almost float out of the end of the barrel of the gun and then evaporate.

Good try my friend, but paper debris doesn't evaporate.




posted on Jun, 15 2009 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by RussianScientists
I've never seen paper debris evaporate, so that rules that idea out of existence...Good try my friend, but paper debris doesn't evaporate

Hold on, comrade. You've never seen it, so it doesn't exist? What sort of Science is that?

And why do you insist that this object is evaporating? You have no evidence of evaporation.

I contend that it is a fragment of paper debris from a paper cartridge, and that the piece of debris turns on edge, lending to the illusion that it is disappearing. Watch the video again, you will see a slight discoloration to the object just before it "disappears"... It's the angle of light changing as the paper fragment turns on edge.

— Doc Velocity



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 01:55 AM
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Originally posted by RussianScientists
reply to post by joesomebody
 


Hi Joe Somebody,

Your explanation is at the very, very top of the list, and all alone; for what I believe to be correct even though we still haven't proven it. I still would place money on your answer being correct.

Thanks for helping out my friend.



Hehe...thanks...also, you should note that the wadding does come out. They are plastic in shotgun shells, and sometimes there is cloth or paper when antique firearms are used.

I attribute my knowledge to highschool chemistry, and being a hunter and gun enthusiast.



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 02:05 AM
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Its the primer, I can't really tell if this gun is cap and ball or cartridge but either way it is the primer...
It is meant to burn hotter and with more length, and heat to ignite the powder.......



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 02:07 AM
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some primers are almost like a very small phosphorous load..... and burn longer than the powder....

[edit on 16-6-2009 by Doc Holiday]

[edit on 16-6-2009 by Doc Holiday]



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 02:28 AM
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Come on guys, can't you just accept that bullets have spirits too?



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by alaskan
 


Mine have created many spirits



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 03:22 AM
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So I guess we can just call this thread dead. If this wasn't an exercise in anal-retentive nit-picking, I don't know what is. OMG! Let's put forty different hypotheses on this tiny bit of ejecta! Where's my Nobel Prize?




posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 05:27 AM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 


Sorry Doc Velocity, but there would be no Nobel Prize for your answer because it fits no scientific facts. Yours is a guess only, and not a very good guess either scientifically.

Joe Somebody's answer is still the best answer by far. If anyone would get the Nobel Prize for this answer, so far it would be Joe Somebody for an excellent answer.

Like I said, it still needs some computer genius to blow up the pictures so that we can see what that off-white colored ball is.



[edit on 16-6-2009 by RussianScientists]



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 05:35 AM
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reply to post by alaskan
 


Sorry Alaskan and Doc Holiday, but there are no spirits associated with this off-white sphere. It still could be some kind of triboluminescence, or new discovery associated on similar scientific phenomenon.

en.wikipedia.org...




posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 06:19 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by alaskan
 


Hi Alaskan,

Believe it or not there are people whom would take your original words seriously, its better to steer them clear right away other than to lead them on to be laughed at later by chiming in on your words.




posted on Jun, 16 2009 @ 11:08 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 22 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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When a bullet travels through a bore...rifled or not...it makes contact with the inside of the bore. The bullet skips, twists and rubs the metal on the inside.

What results is miniscule metal shavings that burn up after the bullet has rolled over them and exited the bore.

This is an example of one.



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