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The search for ET just got easier

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posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:37 PM
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The search for ET just got easier

www.physorg.com...


Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma have confirmed an effective way to search the atmospheres of planets for signs of life, vastly improving our chances of finding alien life outside our solar system.


Scientists are using the transmission spectrum of our planet as a comparison to search for life on exoplanets. This method will be used to observe planets that are being located through various exoplanet surveys .

Primers on Spectroscopy:

www.enchantedlearning.com...

www.sciencelives.com...

astronomyonline.org...

Links:

IAC

www.iac.es...

WHT

www.ing.iac.es...


This is exciting news indeed! Between the Kepler Mission and expanded SETI capabilities
(bandwidth search being increased this month with new equipment installation at Arecibo) I'm very encouraged that our search may reveal news sooner than later.




[edit on 10-6-2009 by elfie]

[edit on 10-6-2009 by elfie]




posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by elfie
 


In other news

Scientists fail to detect NASA Space Critters



yet they are clearly seen in almost every NASA video

explain that one



 

Mod Note: Please stay on Topic – Review This Link.

[edit on Wed Jun 10 2009 by Jbird]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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seems like every month they come out with a revolutionary peice of technology in the search for alien planets. If your interested, like i am, i look at ScienceDaily.com... daily. its a really good website with tons of interesting articles... but more uninteresting ones. But, that sort of adds to the credibility to me, as they cover the entire world of science as opposed to just pseudoscience



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by warrenb
 


It certainly would be a step up to actually have an idea of where they are coming from.
Wish I could explain some of the anomalies. I find the transmission that was cut off mid sentence very interesting--forget which mission.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by warrenb
 



OBVIOUSLY the people at SETI were on a smokebreak. if they were at their workstations (or whtever seti has) we would have proof of all those aliens by now.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Kevin_X1
 


Thanks for the tip! I've seen both Physorg and Science Daily chided for their enthusiasm at times but I find it's a good way to generate interest in science.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:25 PM
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Originally posted by warrenb
reply to post by elfie
 

Scientists fail to detect NASA Space Critters



yet they are clearly seen in almost every NASA video

There's plenty of debris around the shuttle. Flash evaporators that manage excess heat can also create ice floating near the orbiter. Combine with RCS thruster firings to create some interesting videos.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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Well, more propaganda from NASA and "scentists" claiming to be searching for life on other planets. Obviously they already know this and this is just part of the civilian cover up program.

Man I hope the French actually come through with their disclosure project. I'm not holding my breath, but it would be nice.

~Keeper



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by warrenb
reply to post by elfie
 

Scientists fail to detect NASA Space Critters



yet they are clearly seen in almost every NASA video

There's plenty of debris around the shuttle. Flash evaporators that manage excess heat can also create ice floating near the orbiter. Combine with RCS thruster firings to create some interesting videos.


oh you mean like this one?? !!! cuz' i seriously fail to see how 'space debris' can navigate to certain points in space...STOP, and re-adjust and do delta V- directions.. !!!!! but hey.. i'm sure there isn't intelligence behind all the navigation.. oh.. and I don't believe the 'tether' just happend to 'snap' because of the weight.. but..i'll save that for another thread.




[edit on 10-6-2009 by Komodo]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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The tether snapped because it developed a short circuit. Your right about the 'debris' It's not debris. They are definately UFO's!!



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


some people are too indoctrinated for their brain to believe what their eyes are seeing and in turn accept any dim witted answer given by official sources without any further thought to the matter. Oh and they love defending their obviously flawed logic to the point that they become abusive and angry when unable to defend the ridiculous suppositions.





posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


I included links at the end of the post. It's a project funded through the UK in conjunction with the ESA. No need for 'scientists' to appear in quotes, they are scientists.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by Komodo
oh you mean like this one?? !!! cuz' i seriously fail to see how 'space debris' can navigate to certain points in space...STOP, and re-adjust and do delta V- directions.. !!!!!

It's easy if the debris is affected by a thruster firing or if spacecraft is doing a small translation maneuver; in the latter case it appears like the debris is moving while it's actually the spaceship that is moving, but because earth is so far away you can't tell any perceptible difference in the motion of the planet with respect to the spacecraft. As for the debris in the tether video, it's plainly obvious that it's much closer to the lens of the camera than the tether is, which is why they're all the same shape; they're badly out of focus because they're too close to the camera. The funny shape is the reflection of the camera's optics, I get the same effect in my telescope all the time whenever a tiny point of light is out of focus.

[edit on 10-6-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by warrenb
Oh and they love defending their obviously flawed logic to the point that they become abusive and angry when unable to defend the ridiculous suppositions.

I thought my post was incredibly calm. Komodo's, on the other hand, seems to be full of exclamation points, caps, and reads somewhat angry or at least annoyed. I'm surprised you didn't see the irony in your own statement.

[edit on 10-6-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Question. Did you mean "tiny point of light" as in a light source i.e. energy or perhaps reflections?




posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


It was a generalization but I can see how you could assume it was directed at you. In any event...

In regards to the 'debris' I wont bother debating because you're ensconced with your view and I am with mine. Fairs fair.

Getting back on 'topic'. Pretty neat that they've developed this new tech stuff isn't it?

We haven't explored every square inch of the earth yet and we are already finding new things way out in the depths of space.


*edit typo


[edit on 10-6-2009 by warrenb]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by elfie
 


Nopes..any "scientist" who works for the ESA is just a figure head. Now the people who work at groom lake are scientists.

And I put the quotes because they never come up with any real science, they say what they are told to say.

~Keeper



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


I'd be interested in knowing how you have come to the conclusion that the only scientists on Earth work at Groom Lake. Kind of a stretch, at best.

Aside from the Letter to appear in Nature tomorrow (mentioned in the original article) I didn't have any difficulty finding a paper by the scientist in question:

EARTHSHINE OBSERVATIONS OF AN INHABITED PLANET, Enric Palle

arxiv.org...



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 10:26 PM
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Back on course, please...



Scientists are using the transmission spectrum of our planet as a comparison to search for life on exoplanets. This method will be used to observe planets that are being located through various exoplanet surveys .


[edit on Wed Jun 10 2009 by Jbird]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 11:55 PM
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Good find, but to say this practice makes it easier is a bit of a stretch since we have never identified life on other planets. I think you first have to confirm that it exists somewhere else before figuring out which methods are easier than others. Until we can confirm life on other planets, it's all impossible.



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