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Evidence of a civilization found beneath Lake Huron

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posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 01:40 AM
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www.examiner.com...

Researchers from University of Michigan have discovered the remains of a civilization 100 feet beneath the waters of Lake Huron. It is believed to be of the Paleo-Indian era, a time period for which there is very little surviving evidence. Such a discovery would be of great importance as the end of the Paleo-Indian era saw great shifts in human culture.


I don't have a whole lot to say on the topic other then I find if cool that such a discovery has been found and I hope you do to.




posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:04 AM
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Is the examiner a reputable source?



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 02:19 AM
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I don't know, is it?

in the time it took to post that you could have googled the topic and then made a post about it relevance instead of asking the question.

Is sciencedaily.com a reputable source?
same story
www.sciencedaily.com...

I'm not up to date on this sort of thing.

and anyway the story's about hunter gathers from long ago, not clams of some civilization with spaceships and lead to gold formula's.

[edit on 10-6-2009 by thestink]



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 06:31 AM
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A civilization is a society or culture group normally defined as a complex society characterized by the practice of agriculture and settlement in towns and cities. Compared with other cultures, members of a civilization are commonly organized into a diverse division of labor and an intricate social hierarchy.


What the archaeologists have found could be just a settlement. Not a Culture, Not a Civilization.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 05:06 PM
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I saw this in my local newspaper, too. They didn't have much to say on it, except that it's probably quite well preserved because it's been undisturbed for so long.

I'd love to see what comes of this, but I'll bet results are slow going, due to the location. Being underwater won't make research easy :p



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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I wonder how this will impact the Clovis Limit if this "settlement" ends up being dated older then 13,000 years. There have been a substantial number of digs in the last 20 years to cast doubt on the validity of the Clovis paradigm.



posted on Jun, 10 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by RoboKy
 


Well, dating back to when the site was not under water takes us back about 10,000 years, approximately 8,000 BC. The Clovis culture seems to have started around 13,000 years ago, at 11,000 BC. They lasted 800 years max, nowhere near 8,000 BC. So I don't think this is a Clovis site at all.

And if the source article isn't reputable enough for you, the original article did mention that the study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.



posted on Jun, 14 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by RoboKy
 



I wonder how this will impact the Clovis Limit if this "settlement" ends up being dated older then 13,000 years. There have been a substantial number of digs in the last 20 years to cast doubt on the validity of the Clovis paradigm.


I don't think there is a 'Clovis paradigm' anymore. Waaaaaaaaay too much evidence to support a 13ka original human arrival in the Americas. Conceptions of European history don't seem to change much, but American archaeology and history is in a magical period right now. Graffitied bone fragments, 40kya (possibly) footprints, hand tools and suspected scraper marks on mammoths bones. It looks like archaeology in the Americas is going to take all the limelight in the coming years.




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