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Hubble shoots a Ring Galaxy

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posted on May, 1 2004 @ 10:01 PM
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Hubble is still kickin it with some photos of a new ring galaxy.





April 30, 2004 | To mark the 14th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, the Hubble Heritage Team has presented the world with a ring a ring galaxy. The unusual appearance of the star system designated AM 0644741 is the result of a galaxy collision. Millions of years ago another galaxy (outside the field of view above) plunged directly through the center of the disk of what was once a spiral galaxy. The intruder left behind an expanding blue ring of intense star formation in its gravitational wake.
skyandtelescope.com...


[Edited on 2-5-2004 by baked]




posted on May, 1 2004 @ 10:14 PM
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i was looking at at pic and was thinking that is so far away we could not see it without hubble and i soomnd in on the pic and you can see so much more,and thats just 1 direcshon. in all that the hubble can see thai has to bee a crap load of other life. it makes me belive the guy in the dicloshe project video ho said that usa has catloged ove 50 diffret alien speshese. sory for the bad spelling.



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by slayerfan
i was looking at at pic and was thinking that is so far away we could not see it without hubble and i soomnd in on the pic and you can see so much more,and thats just 1 direcshon. in all that the hubble can see thai has to bee a crap load of other life. it makes me belive the guy in the dicloshe project video ho said that usa has catloged ove 50 diffret alien speshese. sory for the bad spelling.


Thats pretty much the feeling I got from the picture. The neverending expance (sp?) of space and we are the most intelligent? I doubt it. I would say the odds of life being in one of those galaxies in the picture alone is pretty damn good.



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 10:53 PM
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Wonderful picture and another perfect example of why we need to keep the funding for the Hubble telescope.

GO HUBBLE!



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:10 PM
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Found this one on the Hubble site.
Another great Hubble shot


hubblesite.org...



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by Seth Bullock
Wonderful picture and another perfect example of why we need to keep the funding for the Hubble telescope.

GO HUBBLE!


as much as hubble rocks, the replacement will be better i think... i don't think we should just let hubble burn up though. definitely needs to be brought done and put into a museum.



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:15 PM
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a musem would be a good idea but that would be way to costly and the more eyes we have up thair the better.



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:17 PM
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I like this one more, think it's prettier and more confusing. NASA's statement:



Explanation: Is this one galaxy or two? This question came to light in 1950 when astronomer Art Hoag chanced upon this unusual extragalactic object. On the outside is a ring dominated by bright blue stars, while near the center lies a ball of much redder stars that are likely much older. Between the two is a gap that appears almost completely dark. How Hoag's Object formed remains unknown, although similar objects have now been identified and collectively labeled as a form of ring galaxy. Genesis hypotheses include a galaxy collision billions of years ago and perturbative gravitational interactions involving an unusually shaped core. The above photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in July 2001 reveals unprecedented details of Hoag's Object and may yield a better understanding. Hoag's Object spans about 100,000 light years and lies about 600 million light years away toward the constellation of Serpens. Coincidentally, visible in the gap (at about one o'clock) is yet another ring galaxy that likely lies far in the distance.


Yes, commander Keen Kid, hubble's replacement well be far better, but so far, from what I've found, it's not being replaced by another visible light telescope, but rather an infrared telescope. I could be wrong, however.

Here's another image to chew over:

[img]
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...[/img]
EDIT: Dang, the pic isn't showing up...Here's the link:

antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...



Explanation: Except for the rings of Saturn, the Ring Nebula (M57) is probably the most famous celestial band. This planetary nebula's simple, graceful appearance is thought to be due to perspective -- our view from planet Earth looking straight into what is actually a barrel-shaped cloud of gas shrugged off by a dying central star. Astronomers of the Hubble Heritage Project produced this strikingly sharp image from Hubble Space Telescope observations using natural appearing colors to indicate the temperature of the stellar gas shroud. Hot blue gas near the energizing central star gives way to progressively cooler green and yellow gas at greater distances with the coolest red gas along the outer boundary. Dark, elongated structures can also be seen near the nebula's edge. The Ring Nebula is about one light-year across and 2,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Lyra.


Enjoy!

[Edited on 5-1-2004 by junglejake]



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:42 PM
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Originally posted by junglejake
Yes, commander Keen Kid, hubble's replacement well be far better, but so far, from what I've found, it's not being replaced by another visible light telescope, but rather an infrared telescope. I could be wrong,


My point exactly! Don't stop funding the Hubble until something better is in place and working!



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 11:45 PM
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isant thair 100s of satalites or something like that up thair,wy not 50 hubbles



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 02:24 AM
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Space is beautiful ... and I agree, how we are the only intelligent life in the universe? How come humanity is so naive and arrogant? All that Sapce-Time between us and the places photographed and not one other species?



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 10:09 AM
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Looking into space and seeing these objects, they look like living animals. I guess in a sense they are, all the bodies of mass working to make a whole. Thank sfo sharing new pics.



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 10:16 AM
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50 hubbles would cost more then the national budget of every nation on earth. Just the one needs to be recalibrated constantly and upgraded. Satelites can get into low earth orbit via a plane. Hubble needs a shuttle.

There is something I read about a few months ago in Astronomy Today. England and the US are planning an incredible telescope. It is going to use hubble, but England is going to put another massive telescope in orbit around the moon. The distance between the two would be the focal point, and possibly be capable of viewing non-Sol planets
I haven't been able to find much info on it since reading about it, however, so the plan may have been scrapped



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 03:22 PM
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that is sooooo beautiful looking...amazing that hubble is gettin scraped and then it comes out with all these wonderful pictures....hope this makes them think twice as these are priceless..

Great find baked..well done



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 03:28 PM
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How much does the Hubble cost to operate? Could it not be sold to a private orginsation (sp?)to be privatly funded? Or would that be unrealistic with the cost? Possibly other countries might want to take it over.



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 03:36 PM
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I concur with you all. Space is absolutely beautiful. Hubble has done a wonderful job and one would hope that we will continue to get these amazing images. One thing though....These are the images that we are allowed to see.....Imagine the images from Hubble that we are not allowed to see. Makes you wonder.



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by I See You
I concur with you all. Space is absolutely beautiful. Hubble has done a wonderful job and one would hope that we will continue to get these amazing images. One thing though....These are the images that we are allowed to see.....Imagine the images from Hubble that we are not allowed to see. Makes you wonder.


This is what leads me to believe that it will not end up in the hands of another country or a privatly owned company.
If I had the $$$ I'd buy it. Unfortuantly, I'm not Bill Gates.
I wonder if he could afford to run the Hubble?



posted on May, 7 2004 @ 08:45 PM
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Another stunning shot by Hubble, the Bug Nebula.




It looks like the painting by Michelangelo



This image of the Bug Nebula, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows impressive walls of compressed gas, laced with trailing strands and bubbling outflows. A dark, dusty torus surrounds the inner nebula (seen at the upper right). At the heart of the turmoil is one of the hottest stars known. Despite a sizzling temperature of at least 250,000 C, the star itself has never been seen, as it is hidden by the blanket of dust and shines most brightly in the ultraviolet, making it hard to observe.
www.astronomynow.com...






posted on May, 8 2004 @ 03:26 PM
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space is an artistic genius.



posted on May, 8 2004 @ 03:52 PM
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If you look at the part circled you can make out what appears to be Jesus or some man, with hands out. just below him to the right in the circle also looks like a woman praying on her knees (Mary?).

Anyone else see it?



[Edited on 8-5-2004 by baked]





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