It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Real Intelligence of Animals

page: 4
77
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 10:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by nixie_nox
Elephants have found to mourn loved ones who have passed on.


So does the Canadian goose



The Canadian goose mates for life. These geese take care of their goslings together and watch over each other for the duration of their lives. If one becomes injured, the healthy one will stay with the injured one until it recovers or dies. If it dies, a goose may take another partner, but in some cases, they simply find a flock to fly with and do not find another mate. They are very devoted to each other and geese tend to mourn after their mates death, just as we do.

ezinearticles.com...




posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 10:42 AM
link   
Here is a great article and a big example of animal intelligence.

DOG DIALS 911

Would you ever call this German Shepard a dumb dog ever again?


HOENIX — "Man's best friend" may not cut it for a Scottsdale dog named Buddy — a trained German shepherd who saved his owner's life by dialing 911 when he began having a seizure, police said Sunday On the recorded 911 call Wednesday, Buddy is heard whimpering and barking after the somewhat confused dispatcher answers the phone and repeatedly asks if the caller needs help. "Hello, this is 911. Hello ... Can you hear me? Is there somebody there you can give the phone to," says the dispatcher, Chris Scott. Buddy barks loudly when police arrive about three minutes after the call is placed. An officer asks Buddy's owner, Joe Stalnaker, if he's OK. Stalnaker coughs, and the call ends. Scottsdale police Sgt. Mark Clark said Stalnaker spent two days in the hospital following the seizure and has recovered. "It's pretty incredible," Clark said. "Even the veteran dispatchers — they haven't heard of anything like this." Clark said police are dispatched whenever 911 is called, but that Stalnaker's address was flagged in Scottsdale's system with the fact that an assistance dog dials 911 when the owner cannot. He said Buddy made two other 911 calls when Stalnaker was having seizures, the first last August. He said Stalnaker's seizures are the result of a head injury he sustained about 10 years ago during a training exercise in the U.S. military. Stalnaker was not listed in the phone book, and a request with police to interview him was not immediately answered. Clark said Stalnaker adopted Buddy when he was 8 weeks old and trained him to get the phone if he began to have seizure symptoms. Buddy, now 18 months old, also is trained to press programmed buttons until a 911 operator is on the line, Clark said. He said Stalnaker got Buddy through Michigan-based Paws with a Cause, which trains assistance dogs nationwide for people with disabilities.


Source

Personally I think every dog should know how to dial 911

[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 10:45 AM
link   
reply to post by karl 12
 


Thanks. Never realized that about the goose. Usualy I am too busy trying not to get all the poop on my shoes. XD



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 11:04 AM
link   

Originally posted by tim1989
Wonderful thread. I've always treated animals with respect and will treat them with more. Here's another bird video.



That is really ingenious! Definitely goes to show how crafty animals can be!



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 12:02 PM
link   
Animals are very intelligent. The use tools, have language, think, feel, do all the things humans do. I used to train horses, & I know that they are clever. They learn, guess, anticipate, extrapolate, connect ideas together, build upon what they already know, etc. Some people may want to think animals are dumb so that they can continue to abuse them, but that is contrary to all the evidence.


Extraordinary Creative & Psychic Powers of Animals
By Michael Goodspeed
www.thunderbolts.info...

Many followers of the Thunderbolts project are familiar with the revolutionary research of biologist Dr. Rupert Sheldrake, author of more than 75 scientific papers and ten books, including the internationally acclaimed "Dogs that Know When Their Owners are Coming Home." In controlled double-blind experiments, Sheldrake has found compelling evidence of "interspecies telepathy," including the uncanny (yet familiar to many pet owners) ability of dogs to anticipate when their owners are returning home. ...


Sheldrake elaborates in his own synopsis of the controversy: "Randi also claimed to have debunked one of my experiments with the dog Jaytee, a part of which was shown on television. Jaytee went to the window to wait for his owner when she set off to come home, but did not do so before she set off. In Dog World, Randi stated: 'Viewing the entire tape, we see that the dog responded to every car that drove by, and to every person who walked by.' This is simply not true, and Randi now admits that he has never seen the tape." ...

I have a thread about cetaceans, possibly the most intelligent & spiritual beings, here:
www.davidicke.com...



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 12:46 PM
link   
I heard a story once while I worked for Assistance Dogs of America (Swanton. Ohio) at a convention in Portland, Or. It was at an awards cerimony, this very lanky trainer Pete comes on stage and shares a story of his dog. (forgot his name so we shall call him puppy)


Pete and puppy, his house dog not a 'working dog", were always in a tiff about the recliner. Both wanted it and only 1 would fit. So, the guy being the "smarter of the 2", so he said, decided he could trick the dog.

Knowing his dog loooooved visitors Pete began to use it to his advantage. He would see puppy all snuggled up in his chair, wanting to sit there himself Pete would go to the window and start in.....

"Oh lookie... whos here??? Is that someone to see you??? I bet they have a treat" and so on. Well of course the dog would jump outta the chair to come and see too. Meanwhile Pete neatly placed his hiney in said recliner.

Pete didn't use this ploy much because he didn't want puppy to figure it out. So one afternoon watching tv about to fall asleep, puppy started putting up a rukus at the door. He stood up and made his way over. Suddenly Pete heard the leather in his favorite recliner make a small whooshing sound. Puppy had taken his recliner the same way.

That'll teach you Pete.


Thought I would share
Hugs, Dax



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 12:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by batch
these videos are awsome

i dont fully get the one with the gorrila has it been asked a question to witch it responded to with sign language that it had been taught or what??

my dog is a clever animal it knows when it is sundays as it comes with me to my nans for sunday dinner and it wont stop moaning geting its lead until we finaly go to my nans then he calms down its amazing really


Koko was taught American sign language. Gorillas take to sign language because they communicate in the wild with signs of their own. I suspect teaching her human sign language was not really hard (comparatively)

[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 12:54 PM
link   
reply to post by ImzadiDax
 


LOL! That is priceless!



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:12 PM
link   
I was thinking about doing something like this because too many people are locked into the belief that only humans and human-like creatures can do what we can (greys, reptilians, etc, are always in ours shape and form). Thank you for this.


The one thing is the elephant drawing though. drawing is something that is basically a means to express thoughts to others who might not understand you. And for an elephant in captivity to draw itself simply holding a flower is really questionable. that seems more like something trained than something inherent. If the elephant had drawn something like itself in a field, or with other elephants, then maybe it would be from itself, but holding a flower? You spend your life in a cage and you will only draw liberating images, not recreational things like holding a flower. Now yes, it could be indicating freedom and the flower could represent nature, and itself finally getting nature, but this would be too complicated, as not even some humans understand imagery or abstract elements through concrete symbols. An elephant in captivity would probably draw other elephants, or a field, or something to remind it of home.



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by Gorman91
I was thinking about doing something like this because too many people are locked into the belief that only humans and human-like creatures can do what we can (greys, reptilians, etc, are always in ours shape and form). Thank you for this.


The one thing is the elephant drawing though. drawing is something that is basically a means to express thoughts to others who might not understand you. And for an elephant in captivity to draw itself simply holding a flower is really questionable. that seems more like something trained than something inherent. If the elephant had drawn something like itself in a field, or with other elephants, then maybe it would be from itself, but holding a flower? You spend your life in a cage and you will only draw liberating images, not recreational things like holding a flower. Now yes, it could be indicating freedom and the flower could represent nature, and itself finally getting nature, but this would be too complicated, as not even some humans understand imagery or abstract elements through concrete symbols. An elephant in captivity would probably draw other elephants, or a field, or something to remind it of home.


TRAINING!!!!

Well. I don't think people understand how animals carrying out things they are trained to do is another form of intelligence. My reasoning there is due to the animal having to do a few things in order to become trained. Here is this particular case:

1. The elephant must first understand the concept that when he puts the paint brush to the paper, the paint sticks.

2. The then elephant has to understand the concept that when you put those lines into a certain place it makes a picture.

3. You have to understand what a picture is before you can draw one.

Or the ravens dropping the balls in a cup to get the food.

1. The raven will have to understand it cannot reach the food.

2. Then through human teaching probably, has to understand the concept that if it drops a rock in the cup it will make the food rise.

3. It has to understand if it drops more in the cup it will get it's food.

I'm sure you noticed that raven frantically looking around for another stone to drop in at the end once it notices how close the food is for the top. Even an animal carrying out training requires intelligence, because they have to grasp concepts in order to carry out their training.

The dog that dials 911. Sure it was trained to do that but there's another problem. How does the dog know when to dial 911? If it was just carrying out it's training wouldn't it dial 911 every chance it got?

The dog has to understand the concept of, when it's owner is in trouble hit this button and help will come.

Animals understand concepts! All we do by training them is give them knowledge.

YOU CANNOT FORGET that humans are nothing but trained animals. Let me explain.

When you are a child you have no concept of words, mathematics, etc etc.

You have to be trained to do math.

You have to be trained to read.

You have to be trained to write.

You are trained that when you make a crayon touch paper it makes things happen.

You have to be trained that a square block fits in a square hole.

We just happen to have a ton of training in every area through knowledge that our species has gained over time. If another species had accumulated all their knowledge and trained each other (which I am sure they do on quite a few levels) then they would have the same kind of advantages and learning curve.

All training is, is giving an animal a concept to carry out. It has to first understand that concept before it can carry out the training. The understanding is the intelligence.

People do not understand that when they see an animal that is trained to do something, the very fact that it is doing that thing, and understanding that concept is a huge sign of intelligence!!



[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by DaMod


The dog that dials 911. Sure it was trained to do that but there's another problem. How does the dog know when to dial 911? If it was just carrying out it's training wouldn't it dial 911 every chance it got?

The dog has to understand the concept of, when it's owner is in trouble hit this button and help will come.


In the case of the dog.. he is trained to a smell. We all know dogs smell things we can not. So when a person is about to ceasure their chemistry change, so does their smell... and thats what the dog looks out for. When they get a whiff they do 2 things,

1. force the person into a seated position
2. dial 911

Thought I would share.
Dax



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by ImzadiDax

Originally posted by DaMod


The dog that dials 911. Sure it was trained to do that but there's another problem. How does the dog know when to dial 911? If it was just carrying out it's training wouldn't it dial 911 every chance it got?

The dog has to understand the concept of, when it's owner is in trouble hit this button and help will come.


In the case of the dog.. he is trained to a smell. We all know dogs smell things we can not. So when a person is about to ceasure their chemistry change, so does their smell... and thats what the dog looks out for. When they get a whiff they do 2 things,

1. force the person into a seated position
2. dial 911

Thought I would share.
Dax


Sure but then the dog would have to understand, when thier owner smells a certain way then they dial 911.

Still has to understand a concept.

Plus I'm pretty sure the dog knew it's owner was in trouble. It was whimpering over the phone after all. We all know what it means when a dog whimpers.



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by DaMod

Sure but then the dog would have to understand, when thier owner smells a certain way then they dial 911.

Still has to understand a concept.

Plus I'm pretty sure the dog knew it's owner was in trouble. It was whimpering over the phone after all. We all know what it means when a dog whimpers.


Oh yea, I wasn't arguing with ya, just clarifying what prompts the dog at the start.



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 02:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by ImzadiDax

Originally posted by DaMod

Sure but then the dog would have to understand, when thier owner smells a certain way then they dial 911.

Still has to understand a concept.

Plus I'm pretty sure the dog knew it's owner was in trouble. It was whimpering over the phone after all. We all know what it means when a dog whimpers.


Oh yea, I wasn't arguing with ya, just clarifying what prompts the dog at the start.


It's hard to tell here on ATS...

Great rescue dog story btw. Just caught it.

[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 05:04 PM
link   
I just found this video and needless to say I was dumbfounded.

It is absolutely amazing! Check it out



I mean wow.

Also a nice chimp intelligence video with some comedy built in



Notice how he learns to steer after crashing a few times.

And how about this one with a monkey on a motorcycle.. He is pretty good huh! He even has the sense to watch for traffic.



I bet if he didn't have that leash he would be gone like a monkey outta hell!

[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 05:40 PM
link   
Cant forget dolphins now can we!





Dolphins own surfers!



Of course, their extreme intelligence will not keep them from humping you...



[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]

[edit on 8-6-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 06:02 PM
link   
reply to post by DaMod
 


Loved those videos, I loved that cat and crow, WOW, and the chimp was so cute!!


The last one with the monkey seems a little cruel to me, seems to have a string around his neck making him go when he says. I think.


[edit on 8-6-2009 by _Phoenix_]



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 07:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Gorman91
 


You are correct; I watched the documentary, and the elephant's trainer tugs her ear, which he uses to guide her trunk as she makes the brush strokes.

Later in the documentary, they set up and had her paint without the trainer, and all of her canvases were abstract strokes.

It is crushing to know that this is the case, because there is no such thing as an elephant in captivity that has been trained absent cruel tactics to usher it into submission.



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 08:10 PM
link   
reply to post by ImzadiDax
 


That puts another level on Pete and Repete.

Pete gets out of the chair...



posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 08:25 PM
link   
reply to post by DaMod
 


Our cats notice their reflection, but they're not vain.




It's funny how an area mockingbird picked up on a toy sound from inside our house and passed it on to a couple of others. It flew up on the porch with me the first couple of times. It flew away when there wasn't an actual bird.



new topics

top topics



 
77
<< 1  2  3    5  6 >>

log in

join