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Question~Why do Freemasons and Jewish People use G-D

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posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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I am familiar with the freemasonry and it's use of G-d to delagate a higher idealism, but I recently noticed that the Jewish faith also use the same thing.


I thought it stood for measurement and/or building authority and mapping of universal language with freemasonry but I have no clue why it is used by Rabbi's and those of the mystical Jewish genre'

If I am wrong in my understanding, please do correct me.

Is there more of a parallel between the two systems of knowledge than I previously realized?




posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


please explain what you mean by G-D?

We use the "G" in our symbolism to represent geometry and God. Where is the "D"?



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:33 PM
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Some traditions do not speak the name of God out of respect or reverence. This goes back to some scriptural references not to speak Gods name or not to speak it in full. Hence the G-D. Not all Jews do this though.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by Skyfloating]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:36 PM
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I know some people do it out of respect for God, like Skyfloating mentioned.
However, I've noticed it from Christians mostly, don't think I've seen a Mason here on the site type it out that way.

Unless you are referring to something else?



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


Skyfloating is on the ball and I am under it apparently. I get what you are saying. Where did you see a mason using G-D instead of God?
We pray to the Grand architect and in some prayers to the Most Glorious Lord God. I think it depends on the lodge but where I am at it is mostly if not all Christians. We really don't talk about it much.

edit cuz I can't spell

[edit on 5-6-2009 by network dude]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 



Hmmm...........

I thought g-d was used in freemasonry.

Am I mistaken?



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


actually, I have never seen it that way. I must be sheltered.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Some traditions do not speak the name of God out of respect or reverence. This goes back to some scriptural references not to speak Gods name or not to speak it in full. Hence the G-D. Not all Jews do this though.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by Skyfloating]


Well then, which Jewish folks do?

I found it written consistantly in a book called "The Chassidic Dimension...Festivals and commemorative days"

Based on the Talks of The Lubavitcher Rebbe Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson............

I remember how in stories about King Solomon the three guys who were melting the gold for the temple went "down" to the ancestor Tubal Cain to find the True Name of God.................I have never seen it written......

[edit on 5-6-2009 by interestedalways]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


G-d is not a Masonic usage, but may very well reflect the individual using that annotation personal beliefs. The word "God" figures prominently in Masonic ritual, and is used in it's entirety (in my Jurisdiction, one must bow your head when uttering the word "God," the Lodge Master will remove his hat). While the Great Architect of the Universe is a generic term to allow each Freemason to apply his own theological beliefs, the word "God" used in Lodge is always of the "big G" variety. I firmly believe this is one of the reasons that Freemasonry has survived the ages.

I would chalk this up to being another misconception, predicated on the fact that unlike the perception, Freemasonry is not homogeneous, nor does it have any central hierarchy.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


Some more non-traditional "reformed" Jews dont use the practice anymore, but most still do.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by Skyfloating]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:55 PM
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I did find a couple of links that used that G-d distinction, but they did seem to be tied to Israel.

I tried to grab a snippet, but my mouse wasn't offered a right click to copy and paste, if interested take a look here.

www.freemasons-freemasonry.com...


Look under the sub heading Evolution of Morality.

I know I have seen it Mucho in reference to Freemasonry...........Really........Otherwise I wouldn't have made the connection~


[edit on 5-6-2009 by interestedalways]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


Freemasonry has members from every religion...hence it also has some members who prefer not to speak Gods name in full. I dont think its a masonic thing though.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
reply to post by interestedalways
 


Some more non-traditional "reformed" Jews dont use the practice anymore, but most still do.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by Skyfloating]


Would the connotation "non-traditional reformed" mean those who have kept the secret?

Hahaha...........Just having a bit of fun.........

But seriously............SF, you know I have a genuine interest............



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:07 PM
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OMG...........

Not the Golden Dawn!!!

www.redmoonrising.com...



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:23 PM
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Hey now................

I am just kidding about the Golden Dawn part.

I don't want to kill my own thread, please help me understand, or Stand Under~



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:28 PM
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For what it's worth...



Question: Why do some Jews spell God, "G-d"?

Answer: God's name is treated with unusual care in Jewish tradition. The divine name, YHWH (spelled with the Hebrew letters yud, hey, vav, hey) is never pronounced. Traditionally, Jews read the word "Adonai" (often translated as "the Lord") whenever reading God's holiest name in Torah or in prayer. However, "Adonai" is not God's name.

Among some traditional Jews, speaking even the word "Adonai" is avoided outside of worship or study. This "stand-in" for God's name is itself replaced by "Ha-Shem" ("The Name"). The practice also has been extended to other Hebrew words associated with God. For example, the Hebrew word "Elohim," which means "God" (the title, not God's name), is pronounced "Elokim" outside of prayer and study.

judaism.about.com...


I hope this can be accepted as a definitive explanation regarding the Jewish faith's perspective. A member of the Jewish faith who is a Freemason would write G-d, a member of some other faith (say Protestant for example) who was also a Freemason would not.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:39 PM
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That's cool, MM.........

I do understand, like was offered earlier, old ways die hard, those old schoolers!

The dash in the middle of the word somehow intrigues me.

Even better than all the above, MM........When I read your last post,

I remembered the message Adonai in the form of a dream I guess a night or two ago, thanks for that "dejavu"



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 08:01 PM
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This is what a google search of Adonai brought to me~

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 9 2009 @ 01:22 PM
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"God" is not a name, "God" is a thing. Thor is a name of a god. Zeus is a name of a god. God is not the name of a god although monotheists use it as a name for convenience I guess.



posted on Jun, 9 2009 @ 02:04 PM
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First of all, "god" has no name you can speak.

Secondly, calling it any name at all is implying a personal relationship to it that may or may not be justified.

"G-D" may be more "respectful" but it still isn't the thing itself!! Which is the realization someone is getting at...



Originally posted by Skyfloating
Some traditions do not speak the name of God out of respect or reverence.



Originally posted by RWPBR
"God" is not a name, "God" is a thing. Thor is a name of a god. Zeus is a name of a god. God is not the name of a god although monotheists use it as a name for convenience I guess.



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