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The MOST important survival skill

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posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:01 PM
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It cannot be learned and it cannot be taught, it is related to the mind. What do you think I'm talking about... Awareness!

That's right, there's one thing that will keep you alive and keep you looking for food. Trust your own instincts people, all the equipment in the world will not keep you safe if you have no common sense.

Awareness is crossing the road to avoid the 5 idiots walking around with knifes/clubs/guns, awareness is reading a situation and predicting an outcome BEFORE it happens.

In a true SitX scenario our powers of observation need to be better than ever, we need to see things before they happen.

A little exercise for you; try reading people in an everyday context. See what they see and see what they think.

There are many, many aspects to survival but the biggest to me is Psychology. Think how they think, act before they do.




posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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Another good tip is to always be calm and keep in good spirits.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by DrumsRfun
Another good tip is to always be calm and keep in good spirits.


Actually, I always thought the Number 1 Survival Tool was keeping calm.
(We must have come from similar schools!)

But awareness is good too.

So, is a clear head.

And you are right, that keeping in good spirits is highly underestimated. Since 99.9% probably haven't actually been in SHTF scenarios irl, we can't comprehend how great of a foe Depression can be in an actual SHTF scenario. The Elements, drinkable water, food supply are all immediate threats, but in the long-term (anything lasting longer than 2 weeks), Depression becomes the deadliest (in a very subtle way) things to deal with.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by DrumsRfun
Another good tip is to always be calm and keep in good spirits.


That's a good tip but when your brother/daughter/son/wife is lagging behind and you've got a broken leg, its not that easy...

I'm trying to instill to people - think ahead, don't let the situation rule you. You rule the situation!



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Death_Kron
 


I agree with you in preparation does matter ALOT.
Always be prepared why they teach boyscouts that.
I am big on always carrying a water filter at the very least.

i]reply to post by fraterormus
 


I agree with you as well because most people underestimate a shtf scenario and how your mindset and depression could be the difference between having something you need or not having what you need and having to suffer for it.
We must come from the same school of thought.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:58 PM
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It's sad to say but i walk with keys protruding through my clenched fist if i walk at night; it gives me a sense of protection.

I've been mugged once, robbed twice and been in a hostile situation with machetes, where thankfully no-one was hurt except for bottles been thrown.

I'm afraid no preparation can put you in the right mental place for those situations and that's just on civy street.

I don't think it's the g'ment you need to worry about if TSHTF, it's the hoodie gangs who will loot and rob indiscriminately, you need to prepare for.

I DO NOT want to lower my morales and walk around with a knife in my pocket, but fear that may be a necessity if things go pear shaped and people's instinct for survival kicks in.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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I think one of most important is teamwork. Like they say united we stand divided we fall.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 06:13 PM
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With the Military they teach their main fundamental the first day your at Basic Training and thoughout your career you sharpen it. And that skill is "Attention To Detail" If you notice the little things and small points, you can do so many things. That and a big one is a Common Sense, a CRAP TON of people in the world def. dont have this and its said, but they are so useful to have, espeically in survival.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by Death_Kron
 





Awareness is crossing the road to avoid the 5 idiots walking around with knifes/clubs/guns, awareness is reading a situation and predicting an outcome BEFORE it happens.

In a true SitX scenario our powers of observation need to be better than ever, we need to see things before they happen.


Excellent example! Great advice, I will share one of my personal experiences, hope it isn't too long!

Awhile after Katrina, I had a business meeting in NO. I was out with some fellas, and I stayed out a little too long. I found myself walking back to the hotel alone at 2 a.m. As I was walking down the sidewalk, I realized all the litte cubby holes and alleyways that someone could snatch me (one of my party had been mugged earlier that night going into a strip club on the same street, because they bragged about a Rolex they won!).

So I walked into the median of the road where I had a better view of my surroundings, and if I was accosted, there were likely to be more witnesses. A few blocks from my hotel a car drove by, hit the brakes, pulled into the median and two guys got out in front of me.

I was very frightened, but there was no where to run, and I didn't have any weapons (stupid airline regulations). I made a quick look around, realized I had no escape, so I bowed up, made eye contact with the one who was driving, looked at his license plate quite obviously, and walked between the two guys with a firm "What's Up Fellas." and continued to walk, while keeping an eye on the shadows behind me in case they approached.

After maybe a minute or so, they got back in their car and drove away.

I don't know what their intentions where, but they had no reason to stop in the middle of the road, get out, and get back in later.

I thoroughly believe that my awareness and attitude (size helped some) kept me from getting hurt that night.



[edit on 5-6-2009 by getreadyalready]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by Death_Kron
 


Before I clicked on your thread I thought - Awareness and Intuition/Instinct. LOL

Psychology helps but people will always surprise you. I think the most important survival tool is exactly what you said. Awareness. Awareness of your surroundings and awareness of your own capabilities.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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All of these are important traits to have in any situation. The true key is knowledge. Situational awareness is part of this. Ask anyone with real dirt time. You must know what is going on all around you at all times. You must know how to react in any given situation. You must know how to prepare. You must know how to use what is at hand. The list goes on.

By knowledge, it is not simply enough to be aware of. It must be used, practiced, and lived. Your life depends on it. So many people are caught up in their own little world, they have no idea what is going on around them.

What was the man wearing that just passed you? What was he carrying? How was he walking? Is he left or right handed? Where is he going? Was the last place you passed a defensible position. Can you use what you have as a weapon? Can you out run your opponent? What bird is in the tree? What is the weather going to do?

All this and more must be computed and filed away for reference. You must know, when, how, what, where, why. You must learn the skills and put them into practice. Survival is all this and more. Can you build a fire, defend against multiple attackers, trust your friend, build a shelter, use various weapons, find water? Learn, learn, learn, It is the key to survival, urban or rural.

Our ancestors where better equipped than we to do all these things. We must revert back to our more primitive, base instincts, as well as use the must up to the minute skillsets, information, and tools that are available to us.

It becomes a lifetime commitment. Those that have it survive. Those that don't will not last.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


Great points!

When I walk into a room, I look at every person, door, and window. Then I pick a spot to sit or stand that gives me a vantage of who comes and goes. I don't know why, I think it started with Macguyver as a kid. I loved that show. I used to sit on the toilet and imagine if I were tied there, what could I use to escape, LOL!

Our natural instincts are still there, they are just not honed. It is important to ignore a lot of what goes on around you in a social or work setting. It could literally drive you crazy to let your fight or flight instinct evaluate every movement, sound, or smell when you are at the office, or the DMV.

See the ADHD thread for examples.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

We have to "train" our senses to evaluate and then ignore.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by getreadyalready]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 09:59 AM
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Yep someone who is agitated makes mistakes. If your calm like in the recent swine flu stuff, you can analyze without being led. Being a sheep can be dangerous.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Thanks for sharing! By no means it was too long!

An excellent example of being aware of what's going on around you and using the situation to your advantage. As you have said if you didn't act the way you did then the situation could of been alot nastier...

And why did you act the way you did... because you was aware


Nice one!



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Well you thought right my friend! Knowledge is power as they say, you also make a good point about being aware of your own strengths and weaknesses.

I didn't actually think of it in that perspective but your entirely correct, it takes a stronger man to realise what he cannot do.

It takes an even stronger man to realise what he cannot do but to find ways around it.

Think old versus young, strength speed and youth versus experience knowledge and intelligence.

For any boxing fans out there anyone who watched Bernard Hopkins Vs Kelly Pavlik will know exactly what I'm talking about!



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


That was another excellent post! You definately seem to have the right survival mindset, I'm liking the fact you use so much attention in viewing situations.

Maybe not now or in everyday life (or maybe so!) the skills you mentioned are going to be so important in SitX.

Slightly off topic, but also the skils you mentioned, i.e. reading people basically, are very useful from a psychological point of view.

I find it interesting to watch how people behave, if you watch long enough you will truely be intrigued!



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


Great points!

When I walk into a room, I look at every person, door, and window. Then I pick a spot to sit or stand that gives me a vantage of who comes and goes.


Now that you mentioned it Reluctantpawn, I always choose the seat with my back against the wall. I don't want any one to sneak up behind me, you know? And I can observe everything without being obvious. I'm glad you brought that point up, it is important.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:40 AM
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It is more than knowing what is going on. It is knowing what to do and how to do it in whatever sit you are in.

knowing that a robber just walked into the store behind you is not enough. Knowing what to do with him is now required. Do you run, attack, or do nothing? These are all viable options. And dependent on the variables the correct response.

Do you know the correct procedure to do all three? And even better are you proficient at them?

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


Agreed, but it is impossible to know what to do in 'every' situation. So the OP point of being "aware" and the subsequent posts including being "aware of your own capability" are the key here.

All the skills that can be learned and practiced are extremely important, but they are of no consequence if you are taken by surprise, or if you put too much confidence in your own ability!

I may have been able to outrun those guys in NO, and I am a pretty skilled fighter, but looking at all the options available, and each of their consequences, made me choose to de-escalate and put up a false-front. I don't know if that is something you can learn anywhere?



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


Agreed, but it is impossible to know what to do in 'every' situation. So the OP point of being "aware" and the subsequent posts including being "aware of your own capability" are the key here.

All the skills that can be learned and practiced are extremely important, but they are of no consequence if you are taken by surprise, or if you put too much confidence in your own ability!

I may have been able to outrun those guys in NO, and I am a pretty skilled fighter, but looking at all the options available, and each of their consequences, made me choose to de-escalate and put up a false-front. I don't know if that is something you can learn anywhere?


I think you can learn that to be honest, there's been a couple of times when I've played stupid/dumb/soft to keep myself safe in a situation.

In said situation I could of been my usual self and gone out all guns blazing, but in all truth to myself I would of been seriously injured.

Sometimes its smarter playing a bit stupid, this is survival after all.

Think about the con-wallet etc

It's all psychology people.



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