First A Jellyfish, Now A Dragonfly... Giant Crop Circles Just Get Weirder

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posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by KaginD
 


Actually KaginD, If you count the body of the dragonfly as a circle and then go all the way down to the tip there is 11 circles. and on the Jellyfish there is also 11 circles 4 of which make up the lower body of the fish. very interesting indeed though!




posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by heineken
 


Thanks for the video!

 


I also just have to post this photo...I really think dragonflys are intensely cool!
The dragonfly with a smile on its face...
It may look like a computer-generated cartoon character, but this smiling dragonfly is the real deal.


www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by ImzadiDax
Wow.... just WOW!!

For the second line....
WOW


Do you think these are 'man-made'?

[edit on 4-6-2009 by ImzadiDax]



It would not surprise me to find that some of them may be tests of space weapons systems. LINK A Focused IR laser could easily drop the stalks of wheat or barley to the ground.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by seataka
 


Very interesting write up there...
Thanks for that link!

On that subject...and I posted some pages back...what better way to test lasers than in a field of crops with no one around?
Practice makes perfect.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by heineken
 


I wonder how many of those impressive human made crop designs (and yes, there are some very good ones) were made at night...and completed within one night to boot. There may be a couple of crop designs shown at this link below that could be done within one night, and at night, but I would bet that most of these couldn´t. As Mars1 from England said, nobody has ever been caught making these things as far as he knows. For that to be the case, as well as taking into consideration about just how long this phenomenon has been going on, it is beyond just being remarkable.

www.alienseekernews.com...

[edit on 4-6-2009 by fockewulf190]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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Just to throw out a wild notion:

Bird's eye view:

www.cropcircleconnector.com...

Side View:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Close-up of the detail in view one:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by Genus_Unknown
 


LOL.. just stared reading thru the thread and that is exactly what I was thinking... I believe you may be on to something.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by cheshire cat
 


Another reason why I'm not Impressed with the Dragon fly is it's set up right along the lines in the field:

img.photobucket.com...

Whereas the Jellyfish is:

img.photobucket.com...


Last reason is the sloppy made tail:

img.photobucket.com...


Sorry, but having issues with the images actually showing up with the img tags.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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wakinup13,

there always 2 sides of the coins...

maybe this imperfection makes it something ET did, maybe humans would have taken care of that alignment for the hoax to be perfect



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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I think they're most probably man-made. We have the ability to achieve some amazing things, so why can't we flatten down grain stalks?

....or Coldplay made them to warn us about World War III



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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Both are great works of art, despite the fact that it probably cost the landowners some coin.

The jellyfish is definitely nicer, but I think it is because of the shorter grass/stalk length than because the makers were better.

We ought to have international contests for this kind of art, then the "croppers" could get a better reward than seeing their work on websites!



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:34 PM
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I found this interesting..


Dragonflies in culture In Europe, dragonflies have often been seen as sinister. Some English vernacular names, such as "devil's darning needle" and "ear cutter", link them with evil or injury.

[3] A Romanian folk tale says that the dragonfly was once a horse possessed by the devil. This is also seen in the Maltese culture as the word for dragonfly which is "Debba ta' l-infern" literally means Hell's mare. Swedish folklore holds that the devil uses dragonflies to weigh people's souls.

[4] Another Swedish legend holds that trolls use the dragonflies as spindles when weaving their clothes (hence the Swedish word for dragonfly trollslända, lit. "troll's spindle") as well as sending them to poke out the eyes of their enemies.[citation needed] The Norwegian name for dragonflies is "Øyenstikker", which literally means Eye Poker and in Portugal they are sometimes called "Tira-olhos" (Eye snatcher). They are often associated with snakes, as in the Welsh name gwas-y-neidr, "adder's servant".

[3] The Southern United States term "snake doctor" refers to a folk belief that dragonflies follow snakes around and stitch them back together if they are injured.

[5] The Lithuanian word "Laum žirgis" is a composite word meaning "the Lauma's horse", while in Dutch, Aeshna mixta is called "Paardenbijter" or "horse biter". In some South American countries, dragonflies are also called matacaballo (horse killer), or caballito del diablo (devil's little horse), since they were perceived as harmful, some species being quite large for an insect. In East Asia and among Native Americans, dragonflies have a far better reputation, one that can also be said to have positively influenced modern day views about dragonflies in most countries, in the same vein as the insect's namesake, the dragon, which has a positive image in the east,[citation needed] but initially had an association with evil in the west. Dragonfly symbol on a Hopi bowl from Sikyatki archaeological site. For some Native American tribes they represent swiftness and activity, and for the Navajo they symbolize pure water. Dragonflies are a common motif in Zuni pottery; stylized as a double-barred cross, they appear in Hopi rock art and on Pueblo necklaces.

[6] It is said in some Native American beliefs that dragonflies are a symbol of renewal after a time of great hardship. They also have traditional uses as medicine in Japan and China. In some parts of the world they are a food source, eaten either as adults or larvae; in Indonesia, for example, they are caught on poles made sticky with birdlime, then fried in oil as a delicacy.

[3] Vietnamese people have a traditional way to forecast rain by seeing dragonflies: "Chuồn chuồn bay thấp thì mưa, bay cao thì nắng, bay vừa thì râm" (Dragonflies fly at low level, it is rainy; dragonflies fly at high level, it is sunny; dragonflies fly at medium level, it is shadowy). In some parts of the world it is considered lucky to have a dragonfly land on you, even to the point of yielding seven years of good luck. In the United States dragonflies and damselflies are sought out as a hobby similar to birding and butterflying, known as oding, from the dragonfly's Latin species name, odonata. Oding is especially popular in Texas, where 225 out of a total of 457 known species of odonates in the world have been observed. With care, dragonflies can be handled and released by Oders, unlike butterflies.

[7] The band, Coheed & Cambria, uses a dragonfly as one of their symbols. Images of dragonflies were common in Art Nouveau, especially in jewelry designs.

[8] They have also been used as a decorative motif on fabrics and home furnishings.

[9] [edit] Japan In Japan dragonflies symbolize "martial success," due to similarity in the sound of the word "dragonfly" and "victory" in Japanese. As a seasonal symbol, the dragonfly is associated with late summer and early autumn.

[10] More generally, in Japan dragonflies are symbols of courage, strength, and happiness, and they often appear in art and literature, especially haiku. In ancient mythology, Japan was known as Akitsushima, which means "Land of the Dragonflies". The love for dragonflies is reflected by the fact that there are traditional names for almost all of the 200 species of dragonflies found in and around Japan.

[11] Japanese children catch large dragonflies as a game, using a hair with a small pebble tied to each end, which they throw into the air. The dragonfly mistakes the pebbles for prey, gets tangled in the hair, and is dragged to the ground by the weight.

[12] Also, in Japan, amongst the Three Great Spears of Japan is one which is called the Tonbogiri, which when translated is called 'The Dragon Fly Cutter'. The spear is an important part of Japan's imperial regalia - the spear itself was once wielded by the legendary Samurai, Honda Tadakatsu. Its name is derived from the story that the blade is so sharp, a dragonfly once landed on it and was instantly cut in half.


Wiki Clicky!

My Favorite line [as pertains to this thread] is:


Native American beliefs that dragonflies are a symbol of renewal after a time of great hardship.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:34 PM
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*awesome*

Now all we need is an ELEPHANT crop circle!!



wZn



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:35 PM
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I would like to send a personal message to the crop circle makers, whoever or whatever they are to see if they have read this thread on ATS.

It is simply this:

On the next few crop circles created, display a flaw in the design. Something that is out of symmetry.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by add alone
 


The tail's circles hit along the edges of the lines that already go through the field, making it seem uneven as you can see in the pictures at this link:


www.cropcircleconnector.com...

That being said - I wonder if the image was created at this particular spot for a reason? The jellyfish circle has coordinates that line up exactly with the sunset on a particular date - I wonder if this one is too???



[edit on 4-6-2009 by CINY8]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by seataka
 


Very interesting write up there...
Thanks for that link!

On that subject...and I posted some pages back...what better way to test lasers than in a field of crops with no one around?
Practice makes perfect.


Actually it really doesn't make sense. By testing these supposed lasers in a field of a farmer, they guarantee that their tests will become public.

If someone is really testing a secret weapon, why would they want the whole world to know about it?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:43 PM
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Ok, this is getting a bit spooky now...

I've talked about jellyfish, insects that lay their eggs in water, Trilobites and fish and posted several pictures in order to get my ideas across...

I saw the jellyfish thread the other day and made a mention in that...
And again, I have to mention it here too..
www.abovetopsecret.com...

If we get a Trilobite, or something resembling the fish in my thread then something is going on..

I may be reading too much, too soon into this but this kind of 'coincidence' don't happen to me every day..

Bring on the next formation.. whoever you are....



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by total newbie
I would like to send a personal message to the crop circle makers, whoever or whatever they are to see if they have read this thread on ATS.

It is simply this:

On the next few crop circles created, display a flaw in the design. Something that is out of symmetry.


this one from a few days www.cropcircleconnector.com... is odd because I have NEVER seen a 7 sided shape like this before ever! It's wild!

wZn



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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Crop circles have always fascinated me, what I'd like to know is if they are man made:

1. Why has no one ever been caught making them?
2. Why, have we not seen any circles that have gone wrong? bearing in mind
some of these circles/designs are 600/700ft wide/long.....can we really
believe that if they are man made, that the guys making them have never
cocked one up completely!
3. How the hell are they done in such a short amount of time?.....at this time
of year in the UK it gets dark just after 10pm and is light again by 4.40am
so just over 6 hours to make such an intricate design without getting caught
and without making a mistake!


Thought provoking stuff!





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