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High-altitude, sudden break-up suspected in Air France crash

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posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 01:10 AM
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there is an article on infowars about whether it was bought down by a bomb

some info on who was on board

"“They were dancers and doctors, engineers and executives, and even royalty. Many were parents, and eight were children,” on the flight that went down in the Atlantic, reports The New York Times. “Prince Pedro Luis de Orleans e Braganca, 26, a member of Brazil’s now-defunct royal family and a descendant of Dom Pedro II, the nation’s last emperor, was on the plane, the royal family said in a statement to the press.”"

www.infowars.com...




posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 01:15 AM
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The official list of victims will be released by Air France, accordingly to the Brazilian Agency of Civil Aviation (ANAC), but accordingly to information by relatives, friends and assistants, the names listed below were in the flight when it left from Rio to Paris last night.

-- Eirch Heine - President of Admistration Council of ThyssenKrupp-Companhia Siderurgica do Atlantico(CSA)

-- Luis Roberto Anastacio - President Michelin South America

-- Antonio Guerios - IT Director Michelin

-- Christin Pieraerts - Employee Michelin

-- Dr. Roberto Correa Chem - Plastic Surgeon - Director of Skin Bank and Chief of Plastic Surgery Service of Porto Alegre Hospital.(Porto Alegre is a City in the South of Brazil)

-- Vera Chem (Wife of Dr. Chem)

-- Leticia Chem (daughter of Dr. Chem - International Roaming manager of OI Phone Company

-- Deise Possamai

-- Marcelo Parente - Chief of Staff of Rio de Janeiro Mayor.

10.) Leonardo Veloso Dardengo - Oceanographer

-- Pedro Luiz de Orleans e Braganca - Prince - Descendant of Don Pedro II Brazilian Emperor 1822-1831

-- Rino Zandonai - Director of the Trentini Nel Mondo Onlus Association - Italy

-- Giambattista Lenzi - Regional Conselor of Trentino Alto Adige - Italy

-- Gianni Zortea - Mayor, Canal San Bovo - Italy

-- Silvio Barbato - Conductor Rio Municipal Theater.

-- Aisling Butler, 26; Irish, of Roscrea, Ireland; doctor

-- Brad Clemes, 49; Canadian from Guelph, Ontario; Coca-Cola executive

-- Arthur Coakley, 61; British; structural engineer for PDMS

-- Jane Deasy, 27; Irish; doctor

-- Michael Harris, 60; American, from Lafayette, Louisiana; geologist

-- Anne Harris; American, from Lafayette, Louisiana

-- Zoran Markovic, 45; Croatian, from Kostelji, Croatia; sailor

-- Eithne Walls, 29; Irish; doctor

www.nypost.com...



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 06:13 AM
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Initially I thought I'd rather not speak but from the moment I heard about this incident, I had a feeling something was not right about it.

"External intervention", anybody? (and I don't mean terrorism) I know it sounds very very odd, but that's honestly the feeling I had when I first heard about it.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 


To All:

I believe that it has been proven that electricity (lightening) travels along the SURFACE of a conductor, not through it or in it. Thus braided wiring is able to conduct electricity better than a regular one element wire.

Lightening hits one side of the plane, travels along the "skin" and finally leaves at the bottom (closest to a real ground).

-EyesII



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by EyesII
 


What ever it might be, either internal wiring fault or external, its slowly emerging that something was way out of the ordinary not because the incident but the nature of it all.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


First of all that is an awful lot of doctors to be on a flight with a bunch of very important people.

Secondly consider this...The gv of the USA and others closely tied with trade with us in ALL forms. (Not listing the big M connection here.) Use commercial flight’s on a regular basis to transport a whole range of “thing’s” scientific and otherwise; from place to place across the globe. There is a slue of carrier’s that have contract’s to move these “item’s” all over the world on “normal” commercial flight’s.
Now consider the amount of doctors on that flight......
Is the carrier one of them?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by xoxo stacie
reply to post by tristar
 


First of all that is an awful lot of doctors to be on a flight with a bunch of very important people.

Secondly consider this...The gv of the USA and others closely tied with trade with us in ALL forms. (Not listing the big M connection here.) Use commercial flight’s on a regular basis to transport a whole range of “thing’s” scientific and otherwise; from place to place across the globe. There is a slue of carrier’s that have contract’s to move these “item’s” all over the world on “normal” commercial flight’s.
Now consider the amount of doctors on that flight......
Is the carrier one of them?


Someone on another thread said there were several Bilderberg's on board. Looking at this list, I think they could be correct. They also made connection to the fact that webbot predicted some of the elites would begin to disappear without a trace this summer?!?!



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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I keep hearing and reading about a possible thunderstrike that could cause the plane to go down. But there's one problem - aren't airplanes flying at altitudes high enough to be above the clouds (thus above thunders)?

Also, I don't think a direct hit with a lightning would damage the airplane in any way. I mean, what's the safest place during a thunderstorm? Your car! An airplane is just a little bit bigger Faraday cage.

(edited typos)

[edit on 4/6/2009 by relu84]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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If there are any members from the Bilderberg groups it shouldn't be too hard to cross reference them



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Normal lightning wouldn't do much to the plane, but a POSITIVE lightning strike could destroy it. Positive lightning strikes are very rare, but they do happen. In the other thread, someone posted a report from some Spanish pilots stating they saw a very bright white flash where the plane was that lasted for 6 seconds or so. Which sounds like a positive lightning strike.

If this was the case, it would be an extremely rare event.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
 


Given the full tanks of jet fuel a 6 second blast inst that unusual considering the load. But what im concentrating in is what is being, there does not seem like a lightning strike.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


The ACARS (aircraft communication and reporting system) is an automatic datalink that would send a message to AF maintenance that there had been an electrical surge or failure.

A lightning strike "could" cause major avionics failures (often does) that would result in the failure of the weather radar system. With the size of the thunderstorms in the area (always the case this time of year), if the radar was non operational, it is quite possible that they would fly into or near the center of a thunderstorm.

With the thunderstorm tops at about 55,000 feet that night, 33,000 to 35,000 would be the WORST altitude to fly in or near the center of a major cell. "If" they did, it could easily cause total in flight breakup.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:08 PM
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In the other thread, there are reports that the pilot slowed the plane before entering the thunderstorm. This is standard operating procedure, but it may have lead to a high altitude stall, and that is very difficult to recover from, especially in turbulence. Airbus has issued a memo to all its pilots, changing the procedure for entering a thundercell.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


It is unusual, but not out of the realm of possibility. According to weather reports in the area, there was alot of storm activity in the vicinity. Positive lightning is only 1 out of every 20 lightning strikes, but it does occur and planes have no defense against it because it's way more powerful than normal lightning.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by habu71
 


Thank you for the heads up, just out of curiosity, wouldn't it require multiple hits to actually breach the skin of the craft.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:19 PM
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Well given the tight lip information been given out i just come across this which makes some sense out of it all

--



The newspaper Le Monde said on its website that plane maker Airbus was preparing to send a warning to the operators of the hundreds of A330 jets in the world with new advice on flying in storms.

Airbus refused to comment on the report. But a company official said operational warnings to airlines using the same type of aircraft involved in an accident was standard.

But a retired pilot, Jean Serrat, said that if France's BEA aviation safety agency in charge of the Air France crash investigation was authorising such a recommendation, "it's because they know very well what happened."


--


and then there is this statement , what do they mean "the unidentified captain" who is this captain and why is he not being identified ?
--


"Suddenly, we saw in the distance a strong and intense flash of white light, which followed a descending and vertical trajectory and which broke up in six seconds," the unidentified captain wrote.

news.ninemsn.com.au...


[edit on 4-6-2009 by tristar]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


Actually wouldn't require a skin breach, lightning at that voltage does weird things.....could have come through the radome (honeycombed carbon) and destroyed the antenna. A minor strike (I've been struck 4 or 5 times) (in an aircraft)
travels along the skin and exits anywhere, leaving pitted skin. But, with a major strike, it can also travel backwards into the electrical systems from practically anywhere, but particularly external antenna strikes.

Precisely why we don't fly in close proximity to thunderstorms.......Darkness, over the southern atlantic, this time of year, and electrical problems and maybe no radar, I pity those guys.....

That being said, the A330 is a h*** of an airplane!!!!



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by habu71
 


Yes i see what you mean, as i do fly transatlantic flights as a passenger several times a year. This is why this seemed weird to me when i heard the storm lighting issue. I remember last flight we were late about 20 mins due to storms as the pilot had mentioned over the internal loudspeaker. Obviously your reply just makes even more valid that , why would he fly directly into the storm, unless it was a massive storm which just crept on them.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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A good friend sent me this: (It's a detailed weather analysis of the AF447 track and weather in the area)

AF 447 Weather analysis



posted on Jun, 6 2009 @ 12:42 AM
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Probe shows 'inconsistency'


PARIS - A PROBE into the crash of an Air France jet in the Atlantic has shown that speeds measured by the plane's instruments were inconsistent, the French air safety investigation agency said on Friday.
Automatic messages sent by the plane before it disappeared on Monday with 228 people on board revealed an 'inconsistency in the different speeds measured,' the Office of Inquiries and Analysis (BEA) said in a statement.

The plane has several devices that measure speed but the data sent by them differed, a spokeswoman added.

Air France chief executive Pierre-Henry Gourgeon earlier this week said that just before the plane vanished it had sent out a succession of automatic messages showing 'multiple technical failures.'

The probe has also confirmed that the plane was flying near a fierce thunder storm when it crashed into the Atlantic Ocean en route from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, the BEA said Friday.

The mystery surrounding the crash has deepened after Brazilian officials said items pulled from the sea were not debris from the downed Airbus, which remains missing midway between Brazil and the African coastline.


I would rather keep this opened for breaking new's rather than ufo theories.



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