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Is this the future of food? Japanese plant factories churn out immaculate vegetables 24 hours a day

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posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by tristar
 


The lights, misters and pumps use a lot of electricity. Enough that when I started growing my various things indoors I got a visit from the RCMP.




posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by exile1981
reply to post by tristar
 


The lights, misters and pumps use a lot of electricity. Enough that when I started growing my various things indoors I got a visit from the RCMP.




Hehehe Yeaaap!

That's the other down side of growing hydroponically in your house. Really it's ok, if you don't mind LEOs knocking in your door when they suspect your power usage is the result of growing an illegal substance.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
reply to post by tristar
 


Well, bananas taste good, but you have to let them ripen.

What has lost a lot of taste to me are Radishes...

Radishes I grew up with were spicy... many people who didn't eat hot peppers wouldn't eat radishes either.... but today I can't even find spicy radishes anywhere.


Yeah, now that you mention it, i too have noticed it, well the more we look into the hydroponics of food growing there more were going to see how fruits or vegetables are becoming tasteless. Just to a sure winner in difference in taste is onions, i have had onions which had absolutely no taste at all let alone give the bad breath syndrome.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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Don't they need warrants in Canada?

Anyways, consider aeroponics. It's different from hydroponics... and like I said earlier, I'm pretty sure aeroponics are what these vegetable factories actually use. Hydroponics are good, but aeroponics would be a requirement for the precise environmental controls they're talking about in that article.

Check out this related article:

Solving the global food crisis: vertical aeroponic farm grows food out of thin air


The results? Up to 98% less water usage, 60% less fertiliser, big, healthy plant growth and no need for pesticides. Impressive.


By extension, this means you use 98% less energy moving water around and 60% less energy moving fertilizer around.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by mattifikation
 


I must admit aeroponics would need the whole environment to be extremely sterile. Just not aware if this has been used on a large scale before.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by tristar]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 01:41 AM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
reply to post by tristar
 


Well, bananas taste good, but you have to let them ripen.

What has lost a lot of taste to me are Radishes...

Radishes I grew up with were spicy... many people who didn't eat hot peppers wouldn't eat radishes either.... but today I can't even find spicy radishes anywhere.


That is really true. Radishes are very peppery depending on variety. Because they are frmed enmasse and teh soil has fewer of the micronutrients the radishes need they don't get that peppery taste to them. The radishes we grow are still lovely and peppery though and great in summer salads



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 02:06 AM
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Come to think of it, mandarines also lack taste as i remember them, well nothing should surprise me anymore since everything has chemicals sprayed on them just for them to even develop.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 02:49 AM
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reply to post by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
 


Those are what you buy in the store elsewhere in Europe. The stuff you buy locally is crap, garbage, poor quality. Even those few veggies grown in the soil on people's couple acres.


I wouldn’t pain Europe with so broad a brush.

Living in Southern Europe I can tell you the fruit and vegetable here rival the best in the world, it they are not in fact the best.
And I refer to the produce bought on every street corner from the men selling from the back of their Ape’s and - what I grow, myself.

It’s nothing but pure gold.

Your generalizations amount to what I put on my tomatoes to make it grow better.




This man made food? It's nothing bur freakish.

Remember, it's not nice to fool Mother Nature!




[edit on 5-6-2009 by silo13]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 03:44 AM
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I've never had a spicy radish. I didn't even know they were supposed to be spicy. I always just thought they were a bland tasting bit of extra color to put on rabbit food... er, uh, I mean salads. Now I want to try a spicy radish, too.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by tristar
Come to think of it, mandarines also lack taste as i remember them, well nothing should surprise me anymore since everything has chemicals sprayed on them just for them to even develop.


I have to say that all mass produced food that is sprayed with chemicals and fed very selective fertilizers tends to be less tasty. This isn't subjective i have tested it with friends. Blind taste tests with family and the like.

Certain foods don't seem to change. Beans for example it doesn't seem to matter. Root veg is does and fruit is the biggest winner. Jam made from wild blackberries is intensely flavoured compared to supermarket stuff and the ones we grow are more intense than the supermarket.

Wild blackberries tend to be smaller, the juice has less water, it's more concentrated. The cultivated ones we produce on our small plot are fed plenty of organic fertilizers and not just the stupid pellet organic fertilizers which are just as bad as the non organic ones at stripping the soil of micro nutrients. Good old horse manure mixed with hay is brilliant. The farming industry is set on producing quantity, not quality and there is good reason for that.

The land that is used it absolutely stripped of micronutrients. The plants can live without them but to thrive and work at their best they need them. The mass produced stuff won't do you harm i don't think, it does however lack flavour and nutrients in comparison.



Originally posted by mattifikation
I've never had a spicy radish. I didn't even know they were supposed to be spicy. I always just thought they were a bland tasting bit of extra color to put on rabbit food... er, uh, I mean salads. Now I want to try a spicy radish, too.


Radishes should taste very peppery depending on the variety. I rarely have the supermarket ones, only at restruants and friends parties. I've been brought up with the proper, home grown peppery kind. They are not spicy like curry, they're peppery like black pepper. Really lovely sliced into salads.

If you can try growing some in your garden. A pot is ok but it doesn't have the same balance as your soil. It takes minimal space for radishes honestly.

[edit on 5-6-2009 by ImaginaryReality1984]



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 06:50 AM
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Funny enough and for no obvious reason i have been discussing this with a chef who works for a hotel overseas and told me a simple test that i should ask people to try.

Find a tomato slice it in half, keep the tomato at distance of around 20 cm from your nose, if you can smell it then its a natural soil grown tomato with limited exposure to chemicals, he also added that its shape will be different to what you are used to.

If you are able to smell it, then with one hand close your nostrils and then place the sliced tomato in your mouth with the other hand, if the taste is equal to the scent of what you were smelling before as far as texture then you have a verified natural soil grown tomato.

At this point, i must say that i have not tried this, so i have no idea if it as he has said to me. If anyone does try this, just give a post to tell me/us what the result was.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by tristar
 


my mom grows tomatoes my whole life so chef was right.

first thing is shape. never saw 2 same tomatoes in our garden , in supermarket they are all same??

naturally grow tomato must have nice smell even more than 20 cm.
and yes taste from inside just from watery part must be the same.

oh yes, texture is important also. if it is "flour like" (can't explain better) stay away from that.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by Dinamo
reply to post by tristar
 


my mom grows tomatoes my whole life so chef was right.

first thing is shape. never saw 2 same tomatoes in our garden , in supermarket they are all same??

naturally grow tomato must have nice smell even more than 20 cm.
and yes taste from inside just from watery part must be the same.

oh yes, texture is important also. if it is "flour like" (can't explain better) stay away from that.


Oh great, thanks very much for the reply, i will be going out of my to test this out myself asap.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by tristar
 


I can tell you this much. Natural produce has nicks and marks, brown spots and black spots. Do you have any idea how much food is wasted by supermarkets looking for cosmetically perfect food? The general public see a brown spot on an apple and think it is deadly i swear.

They would never think that it is fine to eat, i grow apples in my back garden and they're absolutely lovely. Some of them have been eaten by catipillars but are just as nice. Oh and cider apples? We wait for windfall apples every single year.

These apples are on the ground, sometimes on the turn and make the best cider. Being slightly damaged actually increases their sugar content, increases their falvour and so makes them much tastier for cider.

But hey most people will stick to thinking that carrot are a perfect orange without a blemish, that all beans are the same length and come in plastic packets and that potatoes are all roughly the same size and don't contain holes in the middle where they are "blown".

I wonder what they would think if they came across a picasso potato that had a ping pong ball size hole in the middle where it had become to big? Would they throw it away? Or would they do what we do and simply cut around it and eat the rest? The rest is perfectly fine and tasty.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by ImaginaryReality1984
 


Good post, indeed, many if not the majority of people have been conditioned to see perfectly shaped vegetables or fruits from a young age. If we take a step back and speak to a child who was born and raised in a city alone he would not have the knowledge or maybe he would even swear with his own life that non identical shaped fruits or vegetable's are dangerous for consumption.

I guess were at advantage that we have been subjected to what natural soil grown products look and taste like.



posted on Jun, 5 2009 @ 07:59 PM
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I used to think bruised, browning bananas were gross. Now I can't stomach the taste of chlorophyll in "perfectly yellow" bananas. The bruises are the sweetest part...



posted on Jun, 7 2009 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by Dinamo
 


Well i just got back last night and performed that test, much to my surprise it its absolutely true. I must admit, my jaw did fall to the floor.




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