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Is this the future of food? Japanese plant factories churn out immaculate vegetables 24 hours a day

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posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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Why waste this on lettuce, I want to see them grow zuchinnies and squash and cucumbers and carrots.

But the real future of food is this method in Vertical Farms in the middle of cities.

en.wikipedia.org...

That will help create a secure infrastructure of food for city dwellers.

The more we manipulate nature the more advanced and better off we are.




posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
 


Sad to read, my recent house i have bought in the mountains of greece just outside sparta, its situated at around 1950m above sea level, it has around 15 permanent residents in winter and rockets to about 150 during summer due to the cool climate, anyway, most of the villages all have gardens in their yards and their vegetables are non hybrid. The compost they use is from sheep and who knows what else. Oh before i forget even the chicken taste different and the eggs are very tasty but because i am used to super market eggs i cant handle the strong taste of the eggs. lol.
Oh i want even get into the Chamomile i collect from outside my house when ever i visit there compared to that production stuff i get in plastic bags.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


Our village is very similar, doubles during the summer because alot of people have vacation homes. people do grow stuff in small gardens here and fertilize it with goat and donkey crap, but it still tastes quite nasty. Got much better vegtables in the supermarkets in England or the US.

The chicken here is better, it has way less fat than I've seen elsewhere. Eggs are about the same. I grow my own herbs. We have wild ones growing on the mountainside, but alot of them aren't as good or strong as the ones I grow myself in pots or my backyard.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by tristar
reply to post by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
 


Oh before i forget even the chicken taste different and the eggs are very tasty but because i am used to super market eggs i cant handle the strong taste of the eggs. lol.


Strong taste of eggs? what do real eggs taste like? I have bought organic cage free eggs before not much of a difference in taste. Please provide some more detail on the taste of these eggs. I love eggs thats why I ask. Thanks



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:32 PM
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You know, I was just noticing the other day that as much as I love the taste of eggs, it's actually barely detectable. Even the thick yolk that coats my tongue tastes good, but weak.

Is that what you're talking about? I want to eat one of those eggs now...



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by tristar
Well i must say, i have the advantage of knowing what a tomato taste's like when its grown in some remote village in europe and within that same country the tomato which i have purchased from a super market. The difference is like lead to gold, there is no mistaking it.


The problem with that though is you don't know either way if it has lead in it or gold...

I'm putting my money on the veggie factories....



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:43 PM
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Okay as far as the eggs, well in my view, the taste is about 10 fold stronger if there is such a method of measuring.

Also the chicken meat is very very different to what i buy from the markets, umm, i think im trying to explain that in whole, they taste is more richer than what i have been accustomed to while living in the city or other city's around the world.

A prime example of this is when ever i travel there during summer and relatives collect olives for olive oil and they keep the first batch of straining which is called Virgin Olive Oil, its totally different to what i buy even though its called Virgin Olive Oil. I guess the production line of supply and demand has to do with all the differences which i know exist and perhaps my other fellow poster in here from Spain understand what i am trying to explain.

[edit on 2-6-2009 by tristar]



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by tristar

Is this the future of food? Japanese plant factories churn out immaculate vegetables 24 hours a day


www.dailymail.co.uk

They look more like the brightly lit shelves of a chemists shop than the rows of a vegetable garden.

But according to their creators, these perfect looking vegetables could be the future of food.

In a perfectly controlled and totally sterile environment - uncontaminated by dirt, insects or fresh air - Japanese scientists are developing a new way of growing vegetables.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.biospheres.com


God I hope not. Uncontaminated? God created our food to grow in the dirt for a reason. And oh lets not contaminate our food with fresh air. That is going to be real healthy. What in the sh*t is wrong with people? Honestly, I have heard it all.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by mattifikation
You know, I was just noticing the other day that as much as I love the taste of eggs, it's actually barely detectable. Even the thick yolk that coats my tongue tastes good, but weak.

Is that what you're talking about? I want to eat one of those eggs now...


Funny the other day my dad and I were talking about how things taste different now than they used to. Cheese for example does not tast like it once did. I used to love cheese now not so much I mean it is ok but not like it used to be. And eggs, they have litttle taste anymore, milk tastes more like water and penut butter is so sweet you barely tast the nut n it. I think this validates my theory as to why our nation (USA) is so obese, we are starving for REAL food, with REAL nutrients so we eat more and more to fill the void but never get enough. Example a carrot 20 years ago may have had X number of vitamens but that same carrot grown today has considerably less vitamens due to the mass production and the over usage of land over and over thus we are getting less nutrients.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by Melissa101
 


Yes, many people have noticed the same problem all over the world. Its an indication that something is seriously wrong, but because were all too focussed on making money we fail to see the simple amber lights all around us.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by Melissa101

Originally posted by mattifikation
You know, I was just noticing the other day that as much as I love the taste of eggs, it's actually barely detectable. Even the thick yolk that coats my tongue tastes good, but weak.

Is that what you're talking about? I want to eat one of those eggs now...


Funny the other day my dad and I were talking about how things taste different now than they used to. Cheese for example does not tast like it once did. I used to love cheese now not so much I mean it is ok but not like it used to be. And eggs, they have litttle taste anymore, milk tastes more like water and penut butter is so sweet you barely tast the nut n it. I think this validates my theory as to why our nation (USA) is so obese, we are starving for REAL food, with REAL nutrients so we eat more and more to fill the void but never get enough. Example a carrot 20 years ago may have had X number of vitamens but that same carrot grown today has considerably less vitamens due to the mass production and the over usage of land over and over thus we are getting less nutrients.


I do agree that many foods do not taste as they used to. Especially te milk which is very watery tasting now. But I would gladly give up flavor for a 100% guaranteed supply of nutritious food. THe part about carrots not having the same vitamins I do not know if it is true or not. But I would think that the problem with the hydroponic system is that it does not provide the minerals we would get from it growing in the dirt.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:37 PM
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One thing that just crossed my mind as i was reading all the posts, does it not seem unusual that the fruits and vegetables have an identical look to them. I can remember as a child while visiting many villages in sourthern europe and even till today while im on leave i travel a lot through villages and one thing strikes me that the fruit and vegetables are not all identical in size. I do hope that makes sense.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


I did a taste test last weekend with my family, I gave them tomatoes from my hydroponic garden and ones from the store. Everyone commented on the smell and taste of the hydroponic ones and how they were way better than the other ones. I Grow tomatoes indoors in the winter for a little greenery and a bit of extra food.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:47 PM
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Originally posted by exile1981
reply to post by tristar
 


I did a taste test last weekend with my family, I gave them tomatoes from my hydroponic garden and ones from the store. Everyone commented on the smell and taste of the hydroponic ones and how they were way better than the other ones. I Grow tomatoes indoors in the winter for a little greenery and a bit of extra food.



So your saying the hydroponically grown ones where more flavorful? I thought the oppisate would be true since alot of the flavor comes from what the plant extracts from the dirt. Same with many minerals I would think. Do you put certain chemicals in the water to emulate whats found in dirt?



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by Desolate Cancer


I do agree that many foods do not taste as they used to. Especially te milk which is very watery tasting now. But I would gladly give up flavor for a 100% guaranteed supply of nutritious food. THe part about carrots not having the same vitamins I do not know if it is true or not. But I would think that the problem with the hydroponic system is that it does not provide the minerals we would get from it growing in the dirt.


The problem with Carrots in a hydroponic system is that thr root is very long and dosn't do well submerged. There are supposed to be ways to make it work. I find tomatoes and strawberries do well in hydroponic situations. Herbs and lettuce also do bumper crops. I've have a huge pumpkin plant in a hydroponic system right now but it grows but never flowers. I'm going to have to look at the light and nutrient levels again. I've had moderate success with snow peas also.

I've read that the most popular types of commercial crops in hydroponics are
1) Lettuce
2) Basil
3) Spinach
4) Strawberries
5) Flowers

The first three are fast growing and can be done with the raft type of hydroponic system which has the least capital outlay.
6) Tomatoes



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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Originally posted by Desolate Cancer
So your saying the hydroponically grown ones where more flavorful? I thought the oppisate would be true since alot of the flavor comes from what the plant extracts from the dirt. Same with many minerals I would think. Do you put certain chemicals in the water to emulate whats found in dirt?


I use a natural fertillizers made from seaweed that is non toxic and non chemical. The tomatoes have a smell that is really tomatoey, I'm sorry it's just I have no way to explain it other than they smell like I remember they did as a kid. The skins are thinner and they taste like my grandmothers did when I was little. I use heritage seeds so that likely has a bit to do with it also.

My kids used to not really like store bought tomatoes now I have to keep them away from the plants or they pick them when they are still green. My preschool daughter sat and ate 6 cherry tomatoes as a snack the other day.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 11:59 PM
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Well as far as i can remember, my parents used to maintain a small green house at which ever house were at, i do remember tomatoes, cucumbers and potatoes and a later time we had lemon trees, so it was very normal to me then to go to the back yard and pick from the small green house such items. However now that i live in the city, i find myself walking to the super market and buying items packaged in styrofoam and thinking that it must be fresh and good for us.

Oh how times have changed.



posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 12:21 AM
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Originally posted by tristar
One thing that just crossed my mind as i was reading all the posts, does it not seem unusual that the fruits and vegetables have an identical look to them. I can remember as a child while visiting many villages in sourthern europe and even till today while im on leave i travel a lot through villages and one thing strikes me that the fruit and vegetables are not all identical in size. I do hope that makes sense.


It's a Japanese thing, I think.

I've gotten used to it, but I guess it's odd now that I think about it: farmers strive for perfect produce. At the market - farmer's market or supermarket, doesn't matter - it's nearly impossible to find, say, a bag of onions where they aren't nearly identical in size. And as near to spherical as possible.

It's obsessive, but it does my heart good to see it in action. I visited a peach farm down south a few years ago: each peach - as in every single peach in the entire orchard - gets individually wrapped in a special white paper bag as soon as they start to form. The bags get changed regularly as the peach matures. It protects them from the elements and insects (giant hornets, etc). The old farmer I talked to spends his days up and down ladders tending to individual peaches. One by one. Labour of love, and no joke. Happens with everything.

The result: as near to perfection as I've ever encountered. About 3 or 4 bucks for two boxed softball-sized peaches. Expensive, but - let's just say putting them in a pie would be blasphemy.



posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 12:27 AM
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I love cherry tomatoes.

I was actually reading about these vegetable factories the other day. I'm not sure if Japan uses the same technique, but the ones I was reading about use something called aeroponic gardening. Basically, the plants' root systems hang in thin air and are regularly sprayed with a precise mixture of nutrients and water. Light levels, temperature, air quality, nutrient delivery, and moisture are all precisely controlled to allow optimal growth of the food.

Because of the precise controls in the vegetable factories, I would imagine they actually offer *more* nutritious food as a product. The very nature of the project would demand that requirement be met, I would think. As more competing factories start to "crop" up *snicker snicker,* I think the flavor problem will be answered by consumer demand. The factories that make sure their veggies taste good will get more customers, forcing all of the factories to adjust their precision growing techniques accordingly.



posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 12:43 AM
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But with all this pampering, isn't like something is not right, should there not be that differentiality between the sizes. Oh almost forgot a prime example is with the watermelons, i have been used to all sorts of sizes and shapes, but now that i think about it they too can be fashioned to what ever shape you want just like the peaches you mentioned.

A square watermelon, its just looks too weird and the comment of the site is even weirder


a round watermelon can take up a lot of room in a refrigerator and the usually round fruit often sits awkwardly on refrigerator shelves. smart japanese farmers have forced their watermelons to grow into a square shape by inserting the melons into square, tempered glass cases while the fruit is still growing on the vine.

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