It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Storsjö Monster in Sweden

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:44 AM
link   
Sorry about not having posted the video on ATS Media, but everytime I have tried to upload the last few days I get an SQL error after upload has finished.

I have tried several different formats avi, mov, rm, wmv etc. and nothing have helped.

And then I uploaded to Youtube.

Monstervideo on Youtube

Also I had only had the camera a couple of days and didn't think about turning it to video mode.
Sorry about that.

EDIT:
Can anyone upload this video to ATS Media for me?
I have dedicated it to ATS and would like it to be here.



[edit on 1.6.2009 by HolgerTheDane]




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:01 AM
link   
Thank you for sharing!

Would it be possible to Upload the raw photographs to ATS media. Alternatively could you mail them to me (or another member of staff) and we'll upload it on your behalf (same goes for the video). You can U2U me for my e-mail address, or if you'd like some help with the ATS media uploads.

[edit on 1-6-2009 by Gemwolf]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:30 AM
link   
Interesting shots! Thanks for sharing!

I spend a lot of time on a boat in fairly calm waters (upper Chesapeake bay) and I see this same affect all the time. In my opinion, what we're seeing is waves. Often, if there's a current or a tide, you'll get this kind of stationary wave where two opposing currents meet or where there's a sudden change in depth. This wave will kind of roll in place, never reaching shore - and requires no wind or boats - just current -- and not even necessarily a strong current.

I admit, to the unaccustomed eye, it can be a pretty strange thing to see!



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:00 AM
link   
I was advised to upload the original pictures. Here they are.






posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by memoir
Interesting shots! Thanks for sharing!

I spend a lot of time on a boat in fairly calm waters (upper Chesapeake bay) and I see this same affect all the time. In my opinion, what we're seeing is waves. Often, if there's a current or a tide, you'll get this kind of stationary wave where two opposing currents meet or where there's a sudden change in depth. This wave will kind of roll in place, never reaching shore - and requires no wind or boats - just current -- and not even necessarily a strong current.

I admit, to the unaccustomed eye, it can be a pretty strange thing to see!


Interesting that a wave can sort of stay in one place.

What caught my eye was the fact that they moved sideways. Thank you for your input.
You're the first who have had a reasonable explanation for it.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:20 AM
link   
I think they're actually called 'standing waves'

Here's a wikipedia article on it:
en.wikipedia.org...

-- while the article gives a good scientific explanation of the phenomenon, examples complementary to this are apparently kind of hard to come by.

Notice, though, in your images - the phenomenon seems to stand right on the edge of a change in surface disruption. On the far side the water is much more agitated while in the closer side, the water is much smoother. You'll usually see that sort of break in surface consistency around the edges of currents - which would tend to back up my theory of a standing wave.

I hate being a debunker! I wish I could believe this was something more!!



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by memoir
I think they're actually called 'standing waves'

Here's a wikipedia article on it:
en.wikipedia.org...

-- while the article gives a good scientific explanation of the phenomenon, examples complementary to this are apparently kind of hard to come by.

Notice, though, in your images - the phenomenon seems to stand right on the edge of a change in surface disruption. On the far side the water is much more agitated while in the closer side, the water is much smoother. You'll usually see that sort of break in surface consistency around the edges of currents - which would tend to back up my theory of a standing wave.

I hate being a debunker! I wish I could believe this was something more!!


Debunking is good.

You'll notice that nowhere do I claim it to be the Storsjö Monster (other than the title of the thread - but that's marketing for you).

What was interesting - you could say thrilling - was the way the media jumped on my case.

If nothing else this can be used as an example of a natural phenomenon which can confuse you into thinking it is something it's not.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:34 AM
link   
to use an old quote"we need a bigger boat" looks like somthing big down there,



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:02 AM
link   
I’ve never heard of this lake monster before. Do you have any specifics about the ecological conditions of the lake? It would be interesting to calculate if a large predator could survive there.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:04 AM
link   



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:04 PM
link   
The lake has a long history of lake monsters. One of the better lake monsters videos that I have even seen came from that lake about a year ago.

Here it is from a Sweden news cast.

I don't think its a fish or a mammal, but possibly a giant annelid that lives in deep water lakes around the arctic circle.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by testrat
The lake has a long history of lake monsters. One of the better lake monsters videos that I have even seen came from that lake about a year ago.

Here it is from a Sweden news cast.

I don't think its a fish or a mammal, but possibly a giant annelid that lives in deep water lakes around the arctic circle.


The original videos were longer.
One of them showed a piece of debris (probably sea weed) and the other showed a very clear picture of a fish.
When I followed this particular story it all fizzled out in red ears and mumble mumble mumble.



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join